ITT: post your favorite military trivia/obscurities

I'm gonna sleep and come back, you better post some interesting ones

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    every nation's military has fricked ya muddah

    • 3 weeks ago
      synopticon

      >wipe yourself off, ya dead

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Knights of Saint John were made of men from all over Europe and ethnic rivalries between Spanish &I talian and French & German members was a constant problem.

    During the siege of Rhodes, Grand Master of the Knights Phillip de Villiers de L'isle Adam used this to his advantage by positioning the rival knights next to each other on the walls so that they could compete over who could kill more Turks

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >so that they could compete over who could kill more Turks
      That’s good wholesome bonding

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >germ topples a tower onto dozens of turks
        >frog: "that only counts as one!"

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >expecting everybody else to post when you couldn't even be assed to leave an example
    Die

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Even though the Americans had broken the Japanese naval code, the Japs still used a codeword for Midway. To confirm that Midway was the target, the Americans had the Marines on Midway send an uncoded message to Pearl Harbor stating that their desalinization equipment had broken and they needed a replacement.

    The US then intercepted a coded Japanese transmission requesting desalinization equipment for the invasion force, thus confirming Midway as the target

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The tale of SCC Stonewall.
    Built in France under the guise of being made for Egypt as the Sphinx
    Sold to Denmark because cannot sell to the confederates after the Alabama incident
    The Danes do not want it so they sell it to the confederacy
    War ends while it's in transit so when it arrives the US takes control of it
    Lazes around in storage for a few years because post war naval downsizing
    Eventually the Tokugawa Shogunate approaches with an offer to buy it because they're trying to modernize
    It begins sailing towards Japan
    By the time it arrives Imperial forces have taken control so they buy it instead
    As the flagship of the new Imperial Japanese Navy the newly dubbed Kotetsu (japanese for Ironclad) leads the attack on the Shogunate's last holding in the Republic of Ezo

    Later on she would be scrapped and her armor used as part of Tokyo's first electric generators

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >leads the attack on the Shogunate's last holding in the Republic of Ezo
      Said forces approached the ship under false US flag and boarded the ship in attempt to flip the naval balance between them and Imperial forces. Boarding force was repelled with gatling gun fire

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And I forgot to mention the attempt was spearheaded by remnants of Shinsengumi, a secret shogunate police, alongside French military advisors who ignored orders to return to France

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Later on she would be scrapped and her armor used as part of Tokyo's first electric generators
      one could say the ship is itself a metaphor for Japan's modernization

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The prime factor for the creation of the French Foreign Legion was to find a solution to the problem that France was being inundated by unemployed foreign refugees/displaced people/former soldiers.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Poles should do the same with their eastern immigrants.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The bikini swimsuit is named after the Bikini Atoll nuclear bomb tests.

    High heels originate from cavalry boots.

    Men's jackets open differently because a french guy figure out it was quicker to take off for duels.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So the most efficient war-wear is the Zardoz outfit?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Without question

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The US Air Force used the M15 revolver as their standard issue handgun until it was replaced for general issue by the M9 in the mid 80s. The M15 is still used to this day by K9 handlers loaded with blanks to train new dogs how to react to gunfire, as the revolver cycles easier than the M9 or M18. It can also be issued to honor guard color escorts when no rifles are available.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      M15 as in S&W Model 15?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yes, in theory, but the Air Force had a wide assortment of revolvers that were issued under the M15 designation, to include the older Combat Masterpieces, Victories, Model 12 Airweights, and even Colt Cobras and Detective Specials.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    On the last days of the Battle of Saipan, the Japanese had a bugle player play a cavalry charge. That said bugle player was shot by the Americans, and the Japanese unleash their biggest Banzai Charge during the whole war.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    British armoured division in 1944 used 3 different rifle cartridges and up to 3 pistol ones too

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why? What cartridges?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        NTA, but I assume .303, because it was the standard, 8mm Mauser, because the BESA, and 30-06 from American belt feds and shit.
        9mm, 45ACP, and .455 Webley for the pistols and various SMGs, I'm guessing as well.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    During the Siege of Alesia, the Gauls defending the city forced the women, children and elderly from the city in order to conserve food and had them approach the Roman lines. Caesar forbid his men from either taking them as slaves to also conserve food, or allowing them to leave in so that they couldn't pass any messages to other Gallic armies. Denied reentry to the city by their own army, the citizens of Alesia starved and died in the no-man's land between the two armies. The Gauls lost the battle, and the war there, making the sacrifice of the people of Alesia completely pointless.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I love cold war interdiction aircraft here are some neat facts.

      >The F-111 was so well designed it didn't have a maximum "do not exceed" speed instead it had temperature sensor that showed when the canopy started melting. supposedly it could reach almost mach 3 in a dive
      >The Tornado IDS/Gr.1 had a navigation/bombing system based on standard cassette tapes. They were used to load mission data into the flight computer like a Commodore64 but it was also used to record and playback taped audio through the intercom meaning the navigator could play his "One Way Ticket to Leningrad" mixtape on bombing missions.
      >the Tornado also had a highly advanced autopilot system that could automatically follow waypoints and had special short range radar system similar to a RadAtl that would detect obstacles like powerlines or mountains and automatically evade. Pilots could fly an entire bombing mission and only touch the stick on takeoff and landing.
      >the Viggen was designed to be flown from tiny roadbases so a lot of swedish autism was expended on making it simple to fly and maintain. for example the plane can be started without external power by throwing 2 switches (and the rest of the startup checklist is super short)

      this advert for the Gripen shows the ground crew stuff.

      Something similar happened at a siege during the Hundred Years War causing a lot of condemnation from the monks (the SJWs of the 14th century)

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The US Navy Seabees (CB/Construction Battalions) once demolished a literal mountain to clear for an airstrip and to use it as building materiel
    >required the removal of approximately 85 feet, totaling 212,000 cubic yards of rock, from the top of the mountain which obstructed the glide path approach to the airstrip
    >Next, the battalion had to dry-fill a swamp and erect a temporary petroleum tank farm there
    >they filled in sections of the bay up to 98 feet deep and excavated 23 million cubic yards of earth to build the airstrip

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What are the seabees? I tried looking into them but the wikipedia page makes my head hurt for some reason.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Seabees (Construction Battalion, aka CB) were created during WW2 for Navy shore and port facility construction. Originally all Navy installations were built using civilian contractors, and during the Japanese conquest of the Pacific they couldnt fight back the Japanese without being considered partisans. So they Navy had Adm. Ben Morrell of the Bureau of Yards and Docks establish their own organic construction units that could build, and fight too.

        The Seabees were typically civilian constructions workers from the unions who were given handsome bonus' for signing on, and former foremen and master tradesmen were made Senior non-commissioned officers to lead teams of these new sailors. They were organized like Marine battalions and given a watered down version of marine infantry training. They were expected to lay down their tools and pick up a rifle when under attack.

        They differed from other engineer units like in the Army and Marines in that they were their to build actual infrastructure that could support fleet assets like hospitals, airstrips, fuel farms, docks, depots, barracks, etc. Seabees were exceptionally good at their jobs, and often had to make do with limited materiel. They would make their own lumber from the trees they cut down, rebuild captured equipment for their own use (they did this on guadacanal with a captured jap bulldozer), and build entire bases in the matter of weeks. They were also master airfield builders, famously clearing dense South Pacific jungle and building working airstrips in a week. They also were extremely good at repairing airfields, supposedly repairing 500lb jap bomb craters in typically 40 minutes.

        They still exist today, but nearly at a thousandth of the size during WW2. They still do facility construction, runway repair (ADR), and general construction work. And with the pacific getting toasty again, they are starting to go back to their WW2 roots

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. the bayonet is probably the biggest waste of steel in military history, it is rarely used since its inception. in the Napoleonic and American civil wars, bayonet wounds typically accounted for less than 1% of total treated wounded cases
    2. the average Mamluke horseman in the late 1700's/early 1800's had at least six firearms and a javelin, unloading all of them and throwing the javelin before closing quarters with the sabre
    3. general Rosecrans of the army of the Cumberland ordered a statistic compiled after the battle of murfreesboro to see how much ammunition was expended for each rebel casualty, the rudimentary result was 145 musket projectiles for each enemy hit and 27 cannon shells for each rebel casualty
    4. early ironclads had terrible seaworthiness and often foundered in bad weather in open waters
    5. there was one confederate ship that was not aware of the war's end for several months, and raided some commercial shipping during the period
    6. Arthur Fremantle, a British observer in the civil war, saw a discharged female confederate soldier riding a train. he was told that her gender was known to the regiment not long after she known, but she was allowed to stay. she was eventually sent home due to 'moral issues' or something to that effect
    7. Justius Scheibert, an Austrian observer of the same war, captured 5 yankees single handedly in the battle of Chancellorsville by threatening them that they were surrounded
    8. The Japanese had some insanely long ranged aircraft in WW2 (long ranged everything, really). They launched a reconnaissance & bombing run on Hawaii all the way from the Marshall Islands, over 4,000 kilometers away. Two H8K flying boats flew 3,000 kilometers to frigate shoals where they refueled then continued their journey to Hawaii, this was one of the longest bombing runs in history.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >the bayonet is probably the biggest waste of steel in military history, it is rarely used since its inception. in the Napoleonic and American civil wars, bayonet wounds typically accounted for less than 1% of total treated wounded cases

      Survivorship bias and historically ignorant.

      The bayonet was a replacement for the pike, allowing every soldier to carry a gun instead of having a mixed formation, but still be able to repel cavalry. The British loose Waterloo without the bayonet.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Survivorship bias and historically ignorant
        virtually every eyewitness account of these charges states that their use was very rare. In Waterloo, British squares with bayonets 'repelled' cavalry by being a standoff weapon, not being actually used to stab the enemy. Horses won't gallop into huge blocks of men carrying sticks pointed their way.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          after the Civil War at least, the US Army studied the effect of bayonet charges and found that less than 20% of soldiers who sustained bayonet wounds died.
          It turns out that the metrics they looked at were from hospital records, so the only troops that were counted were the ones that survived the bayonet charge, hand to hand combat, got wounded, then was able to be evacuated to the rear

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          So then it's not a waste of steel

          Survivorship bias in that you're not counting all the people who took a bayonet and died as shown in

          after the Civil War at least, the US Army studied the effect of bayonet charges and found that less than 20% of soldiers who sustained bayonet wounds died.
          It turns out that the metrics they looked at were from hospital records, so the only troops that were counted were the ones that survived the bayonet charge, hand to hand combat, got wounded, then was able to be evacuated to the rear

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        loose? did they forget to tighten it?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >the bayonet is probably the biggest waste of steel in military history
      I'd have to disagree, in that at the end of it all its still a knife and knives are useful. Having one be able to mount on your gun is a trivial matter

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fun fact:

        My unit had a squad get surrounded by hostile locals on patrol some years ago. Don’t remember what they were pissed about that day. Crowd was getting bigger and louder by the minute and they were a hair away from being mentioned in law of land warfare classes for decades to come . No fricks were given about the 10-12 marines holding automatic rifles and HEDP, but when the squad leader had them fix bayonets they fricked right off. There’s definitely a psychological advantage to be had.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I have to imagine the spear and club is ingrained deep into human psychology considering thats how half our ancestors (that survived into adulthood) fricking died

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I think I heard this exact story told on this board like 8 years ago. Human mind dont like pointy bit

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There was some black documents spilled all over /k/ around 2012ish.

    It had to do with an experiment inside tube/enclosed living. They administered a gas compound of some kind and when a tell of sorts wasn't complied to they opened the structure. They found all but one guy dead, he had eaten the other occupants even though food was plentiful. He begged them to give him more of the gas.
    >still cant find the documents

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      isn't this the Russian sleep experiment copypasta

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The israelis hired an a SS Nazi Otto Skorzeny to do foreign agent work. He agreed because he was bored.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Wait, wat? I know he helped the Egyptians and Argentinians, never heard of him working for the Israelis. What was he doing?

      He certainly had a wild life, we NEED a biopic of some sort.

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