Why don't "martial artists" train people to use weapons instead of fists?

Why don't "martial artists" train people to use weapons instead of fists? Having a baton or a flashlight is way more useful than just using your fists

Remember that majority of people outside US can't carry a gun

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I mean, there are weapons-based martial arts disciplines, but for most people martial arts training is more about developing your body and mind, learning discipline, and testing that development through sparring. You don't need martial arts techniques to learn to use pepper spray, or hit a guy with a baton, you just need a little practice.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You always have a body. A gun is an object that is expensive, legally fraught, will not always be on your person, and lacks any capability for selectively proportional response.

    Martial arts is about giving you a general purpose ability to kick an untrained person’s ass in a fair fight, not to kill adversaries.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also you can know martial arts and still use a gun. Some people seem to get hung up on dissing martial arts because street fights get dirty, but learning jiu-jitsu doesn't make it so you can't fight dirty or use a weapon, it's just one more tool you can use on top of everything else.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because
    1. Batons suck
    2. You train in a practical "martial art" to train your self in worst case scenario.
    There is very little knowledge needed to use a baton.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why don't "martial artists" train people to use weapons instead of fists?
    Because you stupidly and artificially exclude firearms disciplines from the broader category of "martial arts".

    Brotip: pistol shooting is a martial art. So is rifle.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >hy don't "martial artists" train people to use weapons instead of fists?
    Most martial arts do train with weapons. Classic kung fu has a whole pile of weapons. Kendo is literally the "way of the sword", Kyudo is "the way of the bow", etc. Even much later Western martial arts had a focus on weapons, "single stick" was a thing in Victorian England and that was focusing on fighting with a gentleman's cane. And while it doesn't have a funny eastern sounding name one could argue that any sort of fighting method taught by militaries around the world--with knives, bayonets, rifle butts, etc---are martial arts involving weapons. The same can be said for police and self-defense classes, which absolutely do focus on using batons, flashlights as clubs, improvised fistloads, etc.
    The only martial arts that don't involve weapons are either sports that don't use weapons to avoid hurting the participants or the whole point is to train for when you cannot have a weapon.
    Anybody serious about self defense should train for all forms of combat, unarmed as well as armed. They are not mutually exclusive.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >fighting with a gentleman's cane
      I should get a fighting cane. Just a sturdy chunk of steel pipe or something.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >single stick

      They do, there are several marital arts that focus on specific weapons even, like Kendo, Eskrima, Bartitsu, Irish stick fighting, and of course Fencing. Even styles that aren't based around a particular weapon will often use them to supplement their bare handed techniques. Have you never watched a kung foo movie dude?

      unfathomably based.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    We do. There are martial arts for sticks, staves, swords, clubs, axes, knives, and even guns. Technically, marksmanship is a martial art.

    But back to your question. The most well known martial art for baton fighting is Escrima. You can also use fencing techniques but it's not as effective.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can't carry a baton or a flashlight as a weapon either. Most countries all you have are your fists
    >t. leaf

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Also, you need to know how to use your body, how to at least grapple moderately to use effectively such a small weapon. If you plan to use an impact weapon, knowing how to strike isn't as critical, but you still need to learn how to move and grapple. So you might center around this instead on relying on you using a weapon.

    Many of the old martial arts do train unarmed and armed with some capacity. It's mostly modern sports that are only about unarmed because of the context. But using sticks, swords and knives or equivalent is very common in many martial arts, see even stuff like karate or eskrima and this is as the other said, not even talking about weapon centric martial arts like arnis, kendo to a degree (though it's not practical fighting), and all the older fencing styles from Europe, Japan and everywhere else.

    Besides, "martial arts" now are mostly about discipline and perfecting yourself, not even exactly about dealing with extremely violent situations that warrants the active use of a weapon. Small sticks are not really a typical weapon outside of law enforcement, knives and short blades were used traditionally and this is not something modern states are super happy to allow, so back to fists, kicks and grapples.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They do, there are several marital arts that focus on specific weapons even, like Kendo, Eskrima, Bartitsu, Irish stick fighting, and of course Fencing. Even styles that aren't based around a particular weapon will often use them to supplement their bare handed techniques. Have you never watched a kung foo movie dude?

  10. 3 weeks ago
    BigC

    But they do

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    IDPA is a martial art.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because "Martial arts"that are known in the west are primarily Japanese which where used as a nice distraction after WW2 for those with militarist tendencies to keep them grouped up and under control - to give them a structured mental and exercise regime, keeping their spare time occupied so they didn't have the time to dwell how much of an outside they where in civilian life after they demobbed from the war

    As such a distraction it would have been counter productive to keep them armed

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >implying Martial arts known in the west are primarily Japanese
      The actual martial arts that are known in the west are
      >quite literally every style used in MMA

      which include
      >Muay Thai (Thai boxing)
      >BJJ (brazilian ground fighting)
      >Kickboxing (American boxing offshoot)
      >Western Boxing (A European phenomena imported to America then formalized)
      >Wrestling (A Greco-Roman activity imported to America)
      >Sambo (Russian offshoot of wrestling)
      >the non-banned portions of Krav Maga (Israeli system of grappling and submission-focused takedowns)

      And yeah, some Japanese schools like Judo or Karate, but most people don't spec hard into these because compared to the above they don't get results

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Hell, Kung Fu is Chinese and tae qwon do is Korean.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're ARTS before anything else. It's amazing how easily people forget that.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A hard body with a weapon is infinitely more effective than a soft body with a weapon. Go be 14 somewhere else.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bump

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

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