Why didn't you assholes spill the beans about oscillating tools sooner? I fricking love this thing.

Why didn't you buttholes spill the beans about oscillating tools sooner? I fricking love this thing.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    WE ARE SORRY ANON

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I bought my first one in 2010 anon. Didnt you ever see the FEIN infomercials?

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >ryobi

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Her favorite maker on youtube uses Ryobi, so she had to buy it too!

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're neat but the blades are too expensive so I just use my angle grinder.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What the frick are you trying to cut with it, that an angle grinder will suffice?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Use cheap ebay $1 blades for all situations but rare times you need a decent cut. They work about half as good.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I have successfully "sharpened" a few blades with a triangle file. Also I tried tempering cheap blades and it seems like they last longer. I just hold them with vise grips, torch the end for a few seconds and barely dip the sharpy bit in cutting oil.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Sieg

        That’s hardening not tempering

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Be careful anon. There's an autist running around who doesn't take kindly to your type.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I bought one once to cut a outdoor receptacle outlet hole through some siding and osb. Killed the blade and battery permanently, finished it with a drywall saw.
    I’ve collected like 3 of these things now, never used any of them except that one time.
    Add them to the list of useless fad shit you don’t need.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i cut holes in floors enough to buy one just to finish up after a circular saw, mostly corners but also much easier to feel if the doc was just too shallow on the edges.
      i absolutely would not get it out for use on anything i could get at with a suitable saw.
      its loud af, overheats, eats battery by nature of jobs you use it on. its a necessary evil.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I'm too stupid to use it correctly, so it's useless and no one should like them!!
      frick off boomer

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I’ve collected like 3 of these things now
      Sounds like you keep buying cheap chink shit.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, they came with sets, or given to me by people that don’t want them (whom also got them as package deals). Seems that nobody uses them.

        I agree with the angle grinder guy. That’s one toolyou should probably have.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i cut holes in floors enough to buy one just to finish up after a circular saw, mostly corners but also much easier to feel if the doc was just too shallow on the edges.
      i absolutely would not get it out for use on anything i could get at with a suitable saw.
      its loud af, overheats, eats battery by nature of jobs you use it on. its a necessary evil.

      >kills batteries
      Seems like operator error. I've had a corded one that I've seldom used for many years, until I started using it once in a while for work, that I've never burned out, then I splurged for a 20V MAX DeWalt. I intuitively thought it should need the larger 4Ah batteries, but after using it with a 2Ah and cutting a large opening in a ceiling, along with strips of wood with embedded nails, the battery was still showing full (3 bars). Yours might have a short between the handle and the ground.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        How is a cordless tool grounded?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          They have a ground capacitor that discharges when the battery is on the charger.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It was a ridgid 12 volt jobbie. They stopped making it, and the battery system so no replacements.

        No matter, I just went back to drilling 2 holes and using my old corded jigsaw for new outlets. Waaaay faster, and the jigsaw is still running after 40 years. The jigsaw blade lasts a lot longer than those idiotic comb blades. I see the trim carpenters using them and making more smoke than sawdust! Must be getting pretty hot.

        Note I drill the holes, I don’t have any more of those faddish impact wrenches that still work either.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Bepis

          I wanted that little Ridgid jobmax before they stopped making it. I think the 12V base was underpowered though, I was really hoping they would do a brushless Gen2 12V power base as they released the Octane 18V version.

          Maybe you ran the blade dull and overheated the b***h. Shoulda registered for your LSA and make them replace it. Also no excuse for not getting more batteries if the old ones are dead, Home Depot still sells them (except I have seen the 12V 2.0Ah batteries on clearance lately so maybe it’s online now) and there are knockoffs on Amazon.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, it was a jobmax.
            I have a few of them, and the corded body.
            The one attachment I don’t have is the fricking drill, of all things. It was $65 and I’m like frick that.
            Luckily the battery packs are simple to fix with some bare 18650s, usually one cell goes.
            Also easy to make 12 V adapter, but I have the corded for backup, so no need. I ran down to get the corded body one night in a rage because I was in a hurry and it was quicker than charging the batteries. I live 5 minutes away from HD so they have a lot of my money.
            AEG was another brand of these things.
            Other than the batteries, they’re holding up just fine.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Bepis

              They had a pneumatic power base for the thing as well. And Ryobi sold the same shit under a different name, so you could get the Ryobi branded version of some tool heads for less I think and they were the same fit.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Killed the blade and battery permanently
      For tools that I use infrequently, I avoid batteries.
      Always dead (won't take a charge) after it's been sitting in a drawer for a year. Buy corded unless you are doing a lot of work and can keep multiple packs charged on the job.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Like any tool great if used as intended
    Under cutting door casings to install flooring
    Quick, clean holes in drywall for various reasons
    Cutting caulking from tubs, around windows etc…
    Cutting dried expanding foam from gaps with ease
    Cutting lathe plaster nice and straight without it breaking into chunks.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Cutting MY LIFE INTO PIECES

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use mine as a detail sander, and for plunge cuts and small finicky cuts in wood.
    It slices right through wood with ease. It comes in extremely handy

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Would any of you buy a refurbished Ryobi/Rigid tool?
    Also how the frick do I make my corded oscillating tool less fricking LOUD

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >how the frick do I make my corded oscillating tool less fricking LOUD
      By buying an expensive one that has vibration dampening for the body.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Would any of you buy a refurbished Ryobi/Rigid tool?
      Why would I buy a previously broken tool made by budget standards?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      HF sells about three brands that range $5-$15. Just get a new one.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was trying to get a rusted frozen nut off my snowblower for months until I finally came across metal cutting blades for these and got it off in like 2 seconds. Wish I'd thought of it sooner.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    milwaukee chads sound off

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Red leader - standing by

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's really hard to explain WHY this tool is so useful, you just have to be mid job and realize that you need a very small and precisely flush cut and have it suddenly click.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're great for getting into tight spaces where using a normal sawzall would be awkward and cumbersome. And the best part is, there's various inserts depending on what job you're doing/what you're cutting.
    >pic is my Hilti

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