US is getting israeli injectors against nerve gas

rip chemical weapons

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >The anticonvulsant midazolam has been shown to be effective against both convulsant (e.g., picrotoxin, hydrazine, strychnine, tetramethylenedisulfotetramine) and cholinergic (e.g., sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), tabun (GA), VX, and organophosphorus pesticides) agents by enhancing the inhibitory effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid at GABA(a) receptors and limiting excess central nervous system excitation and seizures.
    neat
    https://chemm.hhs.gov/countermeasure_midazolam.htm#area

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This doesn't really seem like it's done anything. The seizures aren't what kill you with these nerve agents.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Inb4 lost injectors epidemic

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Google says it's a sedative that doctors give you before surgery. I guess it's good that it prevents you from getting seizures and shit but won't it also put you out from fighting for awhile?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Breathe in the gas, start to twitch.
      Jam this fucking thing into a thigh, no more twitchy.
      Feeling loosey goosey, jam adrenaline epipen into other thigh, the world turns raw and red, everything hurts, you don't know who you are, you don't know where you are going, you don't know what you are wielding...
      ...but you know that you must kill.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >DOOM music kicks in

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >midazolam
      So, one of the most basic bitch benzos can stop tons of nerve agents? Pretty interesting

      It's like xanax and so on but used often to knock people out. It puts you in a "twilight state" for minor surgeries. You're conscious and capable of communicating, but you have no anxiety and can barely feel pain and usually lose all memory of the procedure.
      But not for everyone. I remember the doctor telling me that I have a less than 1/10 chance of remembering the surgery and I remembered almost everything. It wasn't painful or scary, but I just don't like having the memory that I was apparently supposed to forget.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's less stop and more best treat the convulsions that happen after you administer the antidotes if you got a big enough does. Still, it was found to be the best, see

        [...]
        [...]

        > Therapy for acute OP intoxication involves pre-treatment with pyridostigmine bromide (when possible), and post-exposure treatment with atropine, an oxime, and an anticonvulsant.

        Seems like you still need an antisiezure drug after atropine and oxime injection and midazolam was found to be the best one.

        [...]
        This anon posted it at the start of the thread and it explains everything lol
        https://chemm.hhs.gov/countermeasure_midazolam.htm#area

        > At 5 minutes or 40 minutes after seizure onset, animals received intramuscular injections of lorazepam or another benzodiazepine. All benzodiazepines tested (lorazepam, avizafone, clonazepam, diazepam, loprazolam and midazolam) offered equal protection against the lethal effects of the nerve agent (11% mortality at 24 hours), and in terms of ending seizures, midazolam was the most potent and the fastest-acting at both time points (5 min and 40 min). When this experimental design was expanded to a range of nerve agents (tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, VX, Russian VX), midazolam was again superior to other benzodiazepines (in potency and rapidity of action) against all tested nerve agents (Shih et al., 2003).

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Ah, makes sense. Yeah, I don't see anything wrong with this as part of standard protocol for nerve agent exposure.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Versed is a benzo and doesn't do anything for nerve gas. On top of that an auto injector sounds like a long nose business scheme, if you have versed to boot into somebody you can probably do the IM from a vial anyway, this saves a couple seconds at most

    t. professional med knower

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also if the real treatment is an atropine injector like mentioned I don't see how it's revolutionary either way, you can use EpiPen tech but filled with...atropine. makes one wonder how much cash the DoD sunk into this bullshit

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Versed is a benzo and doesn't do anything for nerve gas. On top of that an auto injector sounds like a long nose business scheme, if you have versed to boot into somebody you can probably do the IM from a vial anyway, this saves a couple seconds at most

        t. professional med knower

        https://i.imgur.com/PyaitGK.jpg

        Nerve agent antidote autoinjectors have been a thing for a while, since they're given to everyone and you don't want to be fucking with a raw needle when you just got slimed and aren't trained.

        https://chemm.hhs.gov/antidote_nerveagents.htm

        > Therapy for acute OP intoxication involves pre-treatment with pyridostigmine bromide (when possible), and post-exposure treatment with atropine, an oxime, and an anticonvulsant.

        Seems like you still need an antisiezure drug after atropine and oxime injection and midazolam was found to be the best one.

        >The anticonvulsant midazolam has been shown to be effective against both convulsant (e.g., picrotoxin, hydrazine, strychnine, tetramethylenedisulfotetramine) and cholinergic (e.g., sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), tabun (GA), VX, and organophosphorus pesticides) agents by enhancing the inhibitory effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid at GABA(a) receptors and limiting excess central nervous system excitation and seizures.
        neat
        https://chemm.hhs.gov/countermeasure_midazolam.htm#area

        This anon posted it at the start of the thread and it explains everything lol
        https://chemm.hhs.gov/countermeasure_midazolam.htm#area

        > At 5 minutes or 40 minutes after seizure onset, animals received intramuscular injections of lorazepam or another benzodiazepine. All benzodiazepines tested (lorazepam, avizafone, clonazepam, diazepam, loprazolam and midazolam) offered equal protection against the lethal effects of the nerve agent (11% mortality at 24 hours), and in terms of ending seizures, midazolam was the most potent and the fastest-acting at both time points (5 min and 40 min). When this experimental design was expanded to a range of nerve agents (tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, VX, Russian VX), midazolam was again superior to other benzodiazepines (in potency and rapidity of action) against all tested nerve agents (Shih et al., 2003).

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Jfc
      >labored breathing due to chemical agent
      >slam mega dose of Benzo
      >Benzo wears off
      >????

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nerve agent antidote autoinjectors have been a thing for a while, since they're given to everyone and you don't want to be fucking with a raw needle when you just got slimed and aren't trained.

      https://chemm.hhs.gov/antidote_nerveagents.htm

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Military auto-injectors are made to penetrate MOPP gear, so the injection can be made without removing the protection that was supposed to prevent it from happening in the first place.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >more gnomish injections

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    but nobody even uses nerve gas aside from russians

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Remember that when it comes to nerve agents, the cure is almost as bad as the poison.

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