Unroastable Professional Survivalist Gear

Rate and hate.

I genuinely can't believe this all fits in here, complete with food (2-3 days worth plus compression dry bag, not pictured) and regular water bottle of choice (also not pictured) in the side caddy.

Some of this stuff is old, a lot (especially sleeping equipment) is new. Haven't really been backpacking in recent years, so I bought a lot of new stuff. I couldn't find my old milspec compass, for example, so I bought a new Suunto.

The pack itself I've taken through the Grand Canyon, down the AT for a long weekend, up the VA Creeper Trail to camp in Jefferson National Forest, etc.

Below the medkit:
>yellow backpack rain cover
>poncho/tarp in camo stuff sack
>inflatable pillow in grey satin back
>black mesh bag with gaiters
>Frogg Toggs waterproof pack jacket

The rest of this should be fairly self-explanatory (lightweight shirts, socks, and undies bottom-left, in case that's not clear), and yes, I fell for the Windburner meme. No ragrets.

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have to ask, what is "survivalist" about this? Looks like your average camping gear setup.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I have to ask, what is "survivalist" about this? Looks like your average camping gear setup.

      Reddit spacing aside, he's right about everything. You set yourself up for criticism when you called your gear "unroastable", however tongue-in-cheek that may have been.

      >Reddit spacing aside, he's right about everything. You set yourself up for criticism when you called your gear "unroastable", however tongue-in-cheek that may have been.
      Extreme literal-mindedness, such as insisting on interpreting statements literally even when you are aware they aren't intended to be taken literally, has been linked to schizophrenia.

      So even though you know (indirectly, from being told repeatedly by normal people) that concepts such as irony, humor, abstractions, etc. are real and that normal people understand them, from your point of view you've basically been told that Santa Claus exists. You just don't really believe it.

      Sad.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Reddit spacing aside, he's right about everything. You set yourself up for criticism when you called your gear "unroastable", however tongue-in-cheek that may have been.

        derailed.

        https://i.imgur.com/gaHqmWc.jpg

        Rate and hate.

        I genuinely can't believe this all fits in here, complete with food (2-3 days worth plus compression dry bag, not pictured) and regular water bottle of choice (also not pictured) in the side caddy.

        Some of this stuff is old, a lot (especially sleeping equipment) is new. Haven't really been backpacking in recent years, so I bought a lot of new stuff. I couldn't find my old milspec compass, for example, so I bought a new Suunto.

        The pack itself I've taken through the Grand Canyon, down the AT for a long weekend, up the VA Creeper Trail to camp in Jefferson National Forest, etc.

        Below the medkit:
        >yellow backpack rain cover
        >poncho/tarp in camo stuff sack
        >inflatable pillow in grey satin back
        >black mesh bag with gaiters
        >Frogg Toggs waterproof pack jacket

        The rest of this should be fairly self-explanatory (lightweight shirts, socks, and undies bottom-left, in case that's not clear), and yes, I fell for the Windburner meme. No ragrets.

        How comfy is that sleeping pad? My UL pad popped, I've been using a giant one from the 90s and it sucks. It requires its own pack it's so big, and its so narrow my elbows get literally bruised from hitting the ground all night. In my mind its better than a cheap closed foam one though. Do you wake up with your back weird after a night or two?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >How comfy is that sleeping pad? My UL pad popped, I've been using a giant one from the 90s and it sucks.
          Full disclosure, I haven't even used it yet. I bought it as a replacement for my old roll-up foam pad which is also from the 90s (and that I've been using since that time).

          From the reading I've done, I've gathered that they're as comfortable as a pad can ever be on its own, maybe a bit more/more R-value from the egg crate shape, but that the countours flatten out relatively quickly (after 20-30 nights or so, it'll be noticeable).

          Mainly I like that I don't have to roll it up and cinch it tight, nor inflate/deflate it. The thing I hate most about my old foam yoga mat-looking pad is rolling it and strapping it in the morning. This one you just fold in two seconds and strap onto the pack.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did you bring your tourniquet in that medkit?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Did you bring your tourniquet in that medkit?
      Yep.

      Why do you need a rain jacket and a poncho? Take one or the other, depending on conditions.

      Ditch most of the stuff sacks and just cram everything into the pack. Small items will filled the gaps.

      Ditch the rain cover and use a trash compactor bag. Compactor bags are as thick as contractor garbage bags but are a more manageable size and somewhat backpack-shaped.

      Don’t need a flashlight if you have a headlamp. Muh backup is a meme.

      Wear the gaiters or leave them at home. They’re not doing any good in a pack.

      I think I saw a Katadyn pump filter. That’s probably the biggest and heaviest option (a Sawyer Squeeze is like $25 and available at Walmart; don’t get the mini, they’re supposedly prone to clogging).

      >Why do you need a rain jacket and a poncho? Take one or the other, depending on conditions.
      Ponchos are hot and uncomfortable to wear, but can also be used as tarps, flys, ground sheets, etc. The jacket is what I'll actually wear if it rains, while the poncho is a backup that also has other uses.

      >Ditch most of the stuff sacks and just cram everything into the pack. Small items will filled the gaps.
      I remember you (it was most likely you) posting about this in another thread, and in my case, I don't see what it would gain me. The poncho, pack jacket, pack cover, paracord, and gaiters all cram into the heavy-duty bottom/outer compartment of my backpack, and they fit just fine now. How much weight and bulk savings would be gained?

      >Ditch the rain cover and use a trash compactor bag.
      The rain cover packs down far smaller than it appears. It only appears bigger because it isn't stuffed in its compartment. It came with the pack and has buckles especially for it, so I'll stick with it.

      >Don’t need a flashlight if you have a headlamp. Muh backup is a meme.
      A meme that I fell for gladly.

      >Wear the gaiters or leave them at home. They’re not doing any good in a pack.
      They're not doing me any good shitting up my legs and being annoying if I'm not yet in heavy underbrush, either.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Ponchos are hot
        Compared to a jacket? Lol.
        LMAO!

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Compared to a jacket? Lol.
          Yes. Despite not passing water, the jacket (which is very light) does pass air easily enough to be breathable, whereas a poncho does not, and will turn into a sauna.

          This thread has turned into a great honeytrap for people who've never actually left their houses, but then again that's every PrepHole thread.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Ponchos are the most ventilated rain gear you can find outside of an umbrella. It’s why people use them instead of jackets. PrepHole being wrong about such basic shit is what make it enjoyable.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Ponchos are the most ventilated rain gear you can find outside of an umbrella. It’s why people use them instead of jackets. PrepHole being wrong about such basic shit is what make it enjoyable.
              I've been wearing plastic ponchos since before you were born, and for that entire time I've found them to feel hot around the head (if the hood is up), shoulders, and any portion where they maintain continual contact with your clothing and don't flap open in the breeze.

              I know that you noticed they're an open design, there in your chair at home where you spend most of your time, but having a sheet of plastic on you gets hot.

              If they weren't an open design at all (like cheap plastic rain jackets), you'd be boiling instead of just hot (as you do in cheap plastic rain jackets).

              Go outside.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I’m 40

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Where did you go wrong in life?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Life is pretty great. Finished paying my house of this year. Currently having hardyplank siding installed. Finished the home gym last year. Going on plenty of hikes, with a big one planned for the Smokies later this month. It’s still too warm for a jacket, so like everyone else with a functioning brain I’ll be bringing a poncho (a Packa actually). And I can blow off steam by laughing at retards on PrepHole.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >40
                >on PrepHole
                I ask again. Where did you go wrong in life?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You're here forever.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                So the “I’ve been using a thing longer than you’ve been around” guy (you?) would be close to my age, wouldn’t he?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >So the “I’ve been using a thing longer than you’ve been around” guy (you?) would be close to my age, wouldn’t he?
                That would be me. I asked for hate, and I suppose what I expected was something like this:
                >pump filters are trash, get a gravity filter
                >lol 8 oz. fuel can with a Windmeme
                >doesn't even have a Thermarest
                >mfw Kelty
                >mfw LL Bean

                I certainly wasn't expecting 3/4 of the thread to be autistically hper-focused on having a poncho AND a pack jacket.

                Look, I hate ponchos. It is there to fill every role except that of actually being worn by me, and that is why I also have the jacket. I will spread the poncho out on the ground as a picnic blanket when I stop to each lunch, I will spread it out under the tent when I make camp for the night, I'll spread wet items out on it to dry; in short, it's a tarp with a hood on it that, in theory, can serve as a backup if I in some way lose my jacket.

                So why do I own a poncho and not some sort of dedicated ground sheet/extra fly? Because I've had the poncho for years for day hikes and similar outings, in case of emergencies only. Only recently did I acquire the pack jacket.

                In other words, the poncho is grandfathered in and has been demoted from rain protection to dirt cover. I'm not going to buy something else when I already have it.

                I hope that answers all of your questions about the poncho. Love you all, smoochies.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >I hate ponchos.
                It’s weird that you’ve formed this opinion without ever having worn one.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                that's nu-PrepHole for ya

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                To each their own, I love my poncho. So versatile, covers the whole body and pack, so comfy.

                The only thing better than being under a tarp in the rain is a poncho.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >To each their own, I love my poncho. So versatile, covers the whole body and pack, so comfy.
                I have countless memories of being on the trail with a poncho covering me and my pack, and I hated every minute of it. Years back, a poncho or something very much like one was really the only warm-weather, lightweight, packable rain protection around, or at least the only one I knew of, so naturally I used one.

                Waxed canvas has existed for centuries, and Gore-Tex is many decades old, but waxed canvas is heavy and I KNOW that anyone who doesn't think Gore-Tex gets hot has no idea what they're talking about.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Years back, a poncho or something very much like one was really the only warm-weather, lightweight, packable rain protection around, or at least the only one I knew of, so naturally I used one.

                As opposed to all of the options we have now? Hahaha
                Goretex jackets are hot though. No doubt about that. Much hotter than a poncho, which is why people use ponchos and just deal with it turning into a floppidy piece of shit in a slight breeze or snagging anything poking in its direction.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >As opposed to all of the options we have now? Hahaha
                Lightweight, breathable, DWR jackets with features specifically chosen to suit packability and backpacking are a relatively (key word) new product category, but I suppose nothing was stopping anyone from applying a DWR wash to a light windbreaker in the 1980s.

                But yes, there are basically two options, neither of them perfect.

              • 4 weeks ago
                /out/ie

                Looks fine to me.
                I would maybe replace all batteries with lithium, particularly when your stuff isn't used that much. Alcalines eventually fail and leak and then your headlamp is fucked.
                I like the fishing rod, very compact.
                I would maybe add a pad for sitting and a smaller tarp, just in case you want to have a tea somewhere.

                I too use a poncho. It also doubles as a small tarp.

                >*holds up plastic spork*
                Get a titanium one you poorfag, and make sure it has a bottle opener for your tactical beers. Plastic cutlery is for toddlers and cheap takeout restaurants.

                Yes. I use picrel, it's a spoon on one side and a fork/knife on the other. The knife function is stupid and i wanted to file that smooth to get the perfect fork, but yeah. Soon. Anyway, can recommend.
                Or, if you don't mind the weight, regular fork and spoon out of the kitchen. Sporks (that is spoon and fork is one part) don't work perfect as either, i think.

                >To each their own, I love my poncho. So versatile, covers the whole body and pack, so comfy.
                I have countless memories of being on the trail with a poncho covering me and my pack, and I hated every minute of it. Years back, a poncho or something very much like one was really the only warm-weather, lightweight, packable rain protection around, or at least the only one I knew of, so naturally I used one.

                Waxed canvas has existed for centuries, and Gore-Tex is many decades old, but waxed canvas is heavy and I KNOW that anyone who doesn't think Gore-Tex gets hot has no idea what they're talking about.

                >Gore-Tex
                Doesn't make sense in warm weather, as it only works if there is a temperature difference between inside the jacket and outside. The warmer it gets, the less sense it makes. Above 15°C you might as well just wear a simple plastic shell.

                Plastic cutlery allows you to eat your food while it's hotter without burning your lips.

                Good point. That is why i bring a plastic cup.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >I was hot in a thin sheet of nylons but but not in a jacket.
                >it’s waterproof-breathable

                Holy fucking shot, dude

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why do you need a rain jacket and a poncho? Take one or the other, depending on conditions.

    Ditch most of the stuff sacks and just cram everything into the pack. Small items will filled the gaps.

    Ditch the rain cover and use a trash compactor bag. Compactor bags are as thick as contractor garbage bags but are a more manageable size and somewhat backpack-shaped.

    Don’t need a flashlight if you have a headlamp. Muh backup is a meme.

    Wear the gaiters or leave them at home. They’re not doing any good in a pack.

    I think I saw a Katadyn pump filter. That’s probably the biggest and heaviest option (a Sawyer Squeeze is like $25 and available at Walmart; don’t get the mini, they’re supposedly prone to clogging).

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What the fuck are you talking about? Go outside larper.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why bully?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Reddit spacing aside, he's right about everything. You set yourself up for criticism when you called your gear "unroastable", however tongue-in-cheek that may have been.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Reddit spacing! Hahahaha! I’m on PrepHole repeating PrepHole memes! Go back to Plebbit! LMAO!
          You mean a list?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I have to ask, what is "survivalist" about this? Looks like your average camping gear setup.
            [...]
            >Reddit spacing aside, he's right about everything. You set yourself up for criticism when you called your gear "unroastable", however tongue-in-cheek that may have been.
            Extreme literal-mindedness, such as insisting on interpreting statements literally even when you are aware they aren't intended to be taken literally, has been linked to schizophrenia.

            So even though you know (indirectly, from being told repeatedly by normal people) that concepts such as irony, humor, abstractions, etc. are real and that normal people understand them, from your point of view you've basically been told that Santa Claus exists. You just don't really believe it.

            Sad.

            Seething. All I had to do was point out one guy's reddit spacing and that OP was inviting trouble when he made a joke in a place known to be frequented by spergs. You people are too easy.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >"careful OP, you're inviting trouble from spergs with that ironic thread title!"
              >is the only anon who's reacted to the title, repeatedly
              found the sperg

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >repeatedly
                Wait, do you think I'm

                Why do you need a rain jacket and a poncho? Take one or the other, depending on conditions.

                Ditch most of the stuff sacks and just cram everything into the pack. Small items will filled the gaps.

                Ditch the rain cover and use a trash compactor bag. Compactor bags are as thick as contractor garbage bags but are a more manageable size and somewhat backpack-shaped.

                Don’t need a flashlight if you have a headlamp. Muh backup is a meme.

                Wear the gaiters or leave them at home. They’re not doing any good in a pack.

                I think I saw a Katadyn pump filter. That’s probably the biggest and heaviest option (a Sawyer Squeeze is like $25 and available at Walmart; don’t get the mini, they’re supposedly prone to clogging).

                or something?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                He’s got schizophrenia; he thinks everyone is the same person.

                >Extreme literal-mindedness, such as insisting on interpreting statements literally even when you are aware they aren't intended to be taken literally, has been linked to schizophrenia.

                That’s autism, not schizophrenia. But the latter is another PrepHole meme that he’s clinging to. I’m not sure how he expected me to reply to a thread that literally says “Rate and hate” on the first line.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              It's mobile spacing and not making a wall of text you fucktard.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous
              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >boomer Facebook meme
                Really “triggering the snowflakes.”

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Great pic; saved. It really encapsulates the circle jerking that goes on here.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That's not plebbit spacing. He would've hit enter before starting his sentence. If you're gonna try to insult someone, at least know what the fuck you're talking about.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://lighterpack.com/r/nw6loc

    r8me

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not bad, anon. I see alot of similarities with my gear. 7.5/10 would go PrepHole with you

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Non rechargeable batteries my man

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Non rechargeable batteries my man
      I know this is a controversial issue here on PrepHole, but in my case I have a bunch of batteries past their expiration date that need to be used, so I'll latch onto any available excuse to do so.

      I'm not sure where I ultimately stand overall on the power banks vs. batteries debate. My e-reader will last well over a week (even with the backlight on) from full charge reading a few hours per day, and my smartphone is next to useless in the backcountry, so I think I might lean more toward batteries because they provide instant power.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >*holds up plastic spork*
    Get a titanium one you poorfag, and make sure it has a bottle opener for your tactical beers. Plastic cutlery is for toddlers and cheap takeout restaurants.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Plastic cutlery allows you to eat your food while it's hotter without burning your lips.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use stuff sacks and dry bags too but taking these showoff pictures of gear with everything in the stuff sacks is kind of pointless. I can't recognize what products™ you have bought by just looking at the stuff sack. Like, where is the food in this? What food is it?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      People usually don’t put food in these pics. OP forgot to put his food dry bag (or I missed it).

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You’re right. What’s the deal OP? How are you storing your food?

    • 4 weeks ago
      /out/ie

      Make a picture with all your stuff unpacked. I double dare you!

      • 4 weeks ago
        /out/ie

        The blue one is the food bag.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What's the food with the sausages on a green bed?

          • 4 weeks ago
            /out/ie

            Kale and spuds with smoked sausage. These are the same as in the German EPA (MRE). Costs about 1.30€ or so, very cheap, salty and rich in fiber. Easy to prep, they come in thick alu foil, that's it, just put them on your stove or fire.

            Show contents of TT pouch

            Maybe later. From the top of my head: headlamp, keys, money, buff, gloves, powerbank and cable, tiny usb fan, glasses, sun cream, paper, pen.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Holy fuck that's cheap. Inflation hit my country hard and similar meals are very expensive (3-5€).

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Do they have a long shelf life?

              • 3 weeks ago
                /out/ie

                Two years best before, but like the EPA stuff they are edible a long time after that.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Show contents of TT pouch

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/KOaAWyW.jpg

        The blue one is the food bag.

        Thanks for delivering anon
        I'm trying to understand how to pack for multi-day hikes, hence the curiosity. I've always stuffed something in a lunchbox.
        Since I'm at it, I wanted to get a Katadyn bottle but I don't understand if you can improvise if the bottle itself breaks. it's the only reason why I haven't pulled the trigger, I don't want to be enslaved to proprietary bottles and Sawyer filters are way too expensive for the time being.

        • 4 weeks ago
          /out/ie

          The filter fits on Hydrapak bottles too, there is 3l i have eyed.
          But to be honest, the material is really good, i don't think it will break. If it does in the field, you have to improvise, that is why you have to have duct tape on your walking sticks.
          The water drips through the filter if you have the time, so you don't have to have a high pressure seal.
          I also have a Sawyer Mini, but i'm tired of it's lack of speed. The dirty end is proprietary as well there.

    • 4 weeks ago
      OP

      >I use stuff sacks and dry bags too but taking these showoff pictures of gear with everything in the stuff sacks is kind of pointless. I can't recognize what products™ you have bought by just looking at the stuff sack.
      I used words to explain what was in the mystery bags right there in the OP.

      People usually don’t put food in these pics. OP forgot to put his food dry bag (or I missed it).

      >People usually don’t put food in these pics. OP forgot to put his food dry bag (or I missed it).

      You’re right. What’s the deal OP? How are you storing your food?

      >You’re right. What’s the deal OP? How are you storing your food?
      I was pretty upfront in the OP that I haven't been properly backbacking for some years, although I've done up to week-long hikes without resupply in the past, and I live in a very rural town and go PrepHole all the time, sometimes overnight (which isn't proper backpacking, even if camping primitive in a National Forest; you can just throw stuff in any old bag and/or a vehicle).

      But here you go, this came in the mail today, along with hiking shoes and en emergency thermal blanket. There are no decent outfitters nearby me, so I'm ordering my replacement/new stuff from Moosejaw, Backcountry, and Amazon, mostly.

      I will keep my non-prepackaged food double-Ziploced and hoist it at night with the paracord you see in the OP.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >while the poncho is a backup
    SUNK COST FALLACY COPER

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >tenkara rod
    >catching micro fish for survival
    How about getting a real fishing rod? Like a 5 weight fly rod and/or a medium powered, 5 piece spinning rod?

    • 4 weeks ago
      /out/ie

      >can't catch large fish with a small rod
      NGMI

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        not him, but if you think a tenkara has the same chances of catching a bigger fish, you're big dumb

        • 3 weeks ago
          /out/ie

          Admittedly, I don't know a lot about fishing, so i trust you.
          Why do you need a large rod to catch large fish? Is it just breaking stuff?

          • 3 weeks ago
            OP

            >Why do you need a large rod to catch large fish? Is it just breaking stuff?
            This is actually a gradient. You can bring in a 20ish lb. fish on a medium (6-12 lb.) or even a light (4-8 lb.) rod, line, and leader, but it requires more finesse and care (and skill in adjusting drag, etc.), typically takes longer to play the fish until it's tired out, and it's trickier to bring the fish to your net/into the boat.

            Basically, the lighter a rod is than the "ideally matched" weight/line test for a given size of fish, the more skill and time required to bring it into your net/boat.

            On the opposite side of the coin, if you hook a smaller fish with a heavier rod, you can bring it in fairly easily and even lift it directly into the air by the rod, just like in video games (still never a good idea).

            If you set up and use a rod properly, 99% of the time either a knot will give out or your line/leader will break before your rod does.

            Anyway, you trusted the wrong guy, because he's an idiot. You can hook and bring in a 10+ lb. fish with my tenkara rod in the OP.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              I use keiryu rods myself.

              • 3 weeks ago
                OP

                >I use keiryu rods myself.
                I'm thinking of getting into those, myself. If I remember the terminology correctly (not gonna cheat and Google it), those are similar to tenkara rods, but with more backbone and typically longer overall, and used by the Japanese to fish live bait, typically in rivers rather than mountain streams.

                The thing is, there's a lot of foliage cover where I live in most situations. On the other hand, there are several rivers with plenty of clear bank locations, and of course you can also float a boat down them.

            • 3 weeks ago
              OP

              I should note, however, that there is a limit. You're going to bring in an 80lb. catfish with an ultralight rod. The only two scenarios there are getting every inch of line yanked off your spool, or your line snapping.

              As a rule of thumb, anything >2.5x heavier than your max test will be impossible or close to impossible to bring to your net/hand/boat.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              I literally tenkara fished when backpacking for a year straight and found it pointless as bigger fish were typically farther away and my little weeb rod couldn't reach them. I didn't listen to the fishing general when they laughed at me and told me to upgrade to a multi-piece spinning rod, BFS, or a fly rod.

              You're the idiot. A big fish is rarely up shallow unless you're extremely lucky. Stop being a weeb.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                What specific backpacking rod were those spinning reel chads telling you to get?

              • 3 weeks ago
                OP

                >You're the idiot.
                Firstly, I hike and backpack near mountain streams and fish for trout, which I will catch with that rod, and have already countless times before. I'm not going to be fishing for bass.

                Secondly, I didn't stay that all rods were well suited to all locations and conditions, or at all times. I merely stated that tenkara rods are capable of catching big fish, because they are. You said they weren't, and that's because you failed to catch any fish while using one (probably badly), got mad, and decided that the rod was to blame, just like an idiot.

                Thirdly, pic related, it's a giant fish that was caught on tenkara rod. It's not even the biggest fish that's been caught with one.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                that man looks like a pack of cigarettes come to life

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Anon, not to be an ass, but you asked PrepHole to rate your "professional survival gear", got called out for limiting yourself to tenkara and was correctly given the advice to switch to a fly rod, which is more capable in the many situations you'll find when backpacking, shoot that advice down and proceed to call them idiots and to cope by admitting that a tenkara isn't the best in all situations.

                I just don't get it, lmao. I'm going to side with the fly guys here.

              • 3 weeks ago
                OP

                >Anon, not to be an ass, but you asked PrepHole to rate your "professional survival gear"
                Literally ONLY autism sufferers would spend days obsessing over a joke title and shaking it like a dog with a bone. "We're holding you to this, OP! You can't get out of this one!"

                But yeah I'm sure that in a survival situation, there's way less to go wrong with a 5-piece fly rod that doesn't telescope directly into its strongest segment and relies on a metal reel and dozens of yards of line. I bet the Army Rangers take Sage 3 wt setups into the field.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                > to cope by admitting that a tenkara isn't the best in all situations.
                The VERY first thing that guy said, by the way, is that tenkara rods can't catch big fish. He's wrong, end of story.

                That wasn't an admission, it was a statement of fact that applies to all rods. The fact that some dumbass tried to fish for trophy bass halfway down the water column across a river with a tenkara rod is totally irrelevant to this situation.

                A tenkara rod is specialized, yes, and is the ideal thing to have to fish mountain streams (you know, where I'll be) because that's it's specialty, and there's much less to go wrong with it than with a Western fly rod setup. The fact that no one knew that's that's where I'd be is totally irrelevant; you were all still wrong.

                I think you have really bad reading comprehension, OP. Can you reread all the posts those anons told you? Because nobody talked about bass, you did. Nobody said you cannot catch a big fish on a tenkara, you merely assumed that from their posts.

                not him, but if you think a tenkara has the same chances of catching a bigger fish, you're big dumb

                This anon just says you have a better chance with a fly rod. And he's right. You then proceeded to act like your 'survival gear' stuff was just a meme.

              • 3 weeks ago
                OP

                > to cope by admitting that a tenkara isn't the best in all situations.
                The VERY first thing that guy said, by the way, is that tenkara rods can't catch big fish. He's wrong, end of story.

                That wasn't an admission, it was a statement of fact that applies to all rods. The fact that some dumbass tried to fish for trophy bass halfway down the water column across a river with a tenkara rod is totally irrelevant to this situation.

                A tenkara rod is specialized, yes, and is the ideal thing to have to fish mountain streams (you know, where I'll be) because that's it's specialty, and there's much less to go wrong with it than with a Western fly rod setup. The fact that no one knew that's that's where I'd be is totally irrelevant; you were all still wrong.

    • 4 weeks ago
      OP

      >How about getting a real fishing rod? Like a 5 weight fly rod and/or a medium powered, 5 piece spinning rod?
      I have both of those things, and many more. I may not be a career thru-hiker and UL/alpine gear expert, but I am an excellent and lifelong fisherman.

      My backpacking gear is mostly budget-tier, I know, with just a few exceptions. My fly-fishing and fly-tying setups, on the other hand....

      Everything else I do outdoors is in service to my love of fishing.

      Point is: The pole is for fun, not survival. This evening after work my buddy and I went in his truck to pick some treated lumber up from a piece of land he owns down an extremely rough backcountry road, and I brought my tenkara with me.

      Found a beautiful tiny creek (hardly more than a moving puddle), held the tenkara line directly in my hand (too much brush and trees to cast with literally any kind of rod), dapped it directly into the water, and caught a 4-inch brookie, This was in passing, in the space of 5 minutes, on our way to do something.

      But tenkara poles can catch fish weighing in the double digits, if they're strong enough (the Hellbender you see in the OP is). You are truly ignorant if you think that someone can't put a bass fly on a fishing pole just because of the pole's configuration, or because it was originally intended to catch amago and char..

      Also, big fish can and will hit relatively small lures and flies, and also live bait, but small fish typically won't hit a $300 12-inch luxury swimbait because they think it's a predator.

      Even I, however, will admit that huge lures do have a greater chance of catching bigger fish. It's more food, more easily seen, more tempting, a greater prize for them.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Idk what you mean by professional. Like tasmanian tiger, snugpak and shit like that?

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hey PrepHoleists I need a knife for travel and backpacking. It's going to be an utility tool so it shouldn't be too expensive, neither too large for easy EDC and not to alert any inquisitive border cops. Location is EU.

    • 3 weeks ago
      /out/ie

      The apple cutter.
      But seriously, Victorinox Workchamp if you want a multitool, Opinel No.7 or No.8 if you just want a blade.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Victorinox Workchamp
        If Mountaineer with a wood saw exists, that one is the best

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That's it, found it: the Ranger. That's probably the most useful without going into Swisschamp territory.

          • 3 weeks ago
            /out/ie

            No pliers.
            But anyway, made a mistake, meant the Hercules. It has pliers, scissors and saw and phillips.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >No pliers.
              Oh yeah, pliers are useful. I carry the small Knipex so I didn't think about it.

Your email address will not be published.