Tilapia Farming

Anyone know what to look at and constantly monitor when it comes to quality of water for a tilapia fish farm? I know that I need to monitor PH, but I know that there’s something called “hardness” and other stuff that are basically key indicators. I just don’t know what they’re called, or what to use to constantly monitor them.

Anyone have any advice? It’s for a farm I recently opened…my tilapia keep dying.

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    are you a Hispanic or flip? nobody wants to eat your mudfish

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I’m born in america. British German Irish Italian. Selling this fish to beaners.

      How much time have you spent reading about fish farming?

      A lot. Do you have any recommendations for best testing equipment whether digital or disposable? I want something that is an all in one test preferably. Do you have any farm at all?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Selling this fish to beaners.
        then just sell them the diseased and dead fish. do the world a favor.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you can’t help why even bother? You have problems kid.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How much time have you spent reading about fish farming?

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just dump antibiotics in it and forget about it
    Thats what every other fish factory does.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      PH meters are cheap, buy one
      is the water properly oxygenated?
      is the fish waste being addressed?
      is the filtering system working?

      you need to randomly inspect fish and isolate sickly ones, antibotics need to be used when you densely pack animals

      post pictures of the setup if you are serious

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you are heating the water, right anon?

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >keep dying
    That's Nature's way of telling you there are too many fish in this small place and down-adjusting.
    Doing anything else requires utter defiance of Nature and the use of antibiotics and filters and oxygenators and and and.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >requires utter defiance of Nature
      To elaborate, it means recreating the resources of a space 10x larger into a little closet.
      You're in the life support business.
      When you've done it successfully, you could operate your farm in orbit except for the consumables.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >you could operate your farm in orbit
        except in space there is no "up" or "down" so the concept of "belly up" has no meaning so a critical marker used to determine the status of fish is unavailable. They might all be dead and appear A-OK or alive and simply oriented in a death like posture.
        On top of this the cost and difficulty of fitting each tilapia with a space suit with on-board medical telemetry prevents using a traditional solution to monitoring vital signs and general health in orbit.
        Until these issues are solved I'm afraid your space based tilapia farm won't get off the drawing board.
        Pic related is the way to go.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >"belly up" has no meaning
          Au contraire Mon Capitan! They go belly up because of gas accumulation. Buoyancy still works. It's just that the gas-extra ones will drift to the perimeter of the water sphere.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Buoyancy still works. It's just that the gas-extra ones will drift to the perimeter of the water sphere.

            Nope.

            "Consider what would happen on Earth: The air bubble, lighter than water, would race upward to burst through the surface of the droplet. In space, the air bubble doesn't rise because it is no lighter than the water around it—there's no buoyancy. The droplet doesn't fall from the leaf because there's no force to pull it off. It's stuck there by molecular adhesion."

            https://www.usgs.gov/special-topics/water-science-school/science/water-space-how-does-water-behave-outer-space#overview

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hardness is certain dissolved minerals and comes in two flavors, sometimes called carbonate hardness and general hardness or temporary and permanent hardness. You want to measure both. Typically little paper strip indicators are a good convenient option. They carry these in pet stores in kits with all the ph, hardness, nitrates, etc. tests included. Cheaper than electronic meters and don't need calibration or storage fluid. Run those and adjust your setup as needed.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not to be rude but these kinds of things seem like something you would research and learn about before starting a fish farm op.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I maintain around 50-75 tilapia in an aquaponics system and I don't constantly monitor anything. I check a few times a day to make sure my pump and air stone are working and that's it. Some other anons suggested water temperature but tilapia can survive in waters as warm as 95 degrees F and as cold as 50 degrees F so I doubt that has anything to do with it.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Another gotcha: avoid galvanized stuff in your setup. The zinc will dissolve and poison your fish. The most common cause of this is using galvanized screws and hose clamps.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >but I know that there’s something called “hardness” and other stuff that are basically key indicators
    Turbidity? Pretty sure there's a shitload of such sensors already made to work with an Arduino and similar microcontroller.

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