The residents of Kharkiv have been collecting remains of r*ssian ammunitions dropped on them.

The residents of Kharkiv have been collecting remains of r*ssian ammunitions dropped on them.
Never thought about how much of the ammo remains fall back. Do all munitions leave behind so much junk? Did anything similar happen during other wars? Or are the Ukrainian's just doing a better job at cleaning up after the orks?
Source: https://youtu.be/w2v_N_dF3-w

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    WW1 was particularly infamous for the ammount of munitions left lying over the place. Every year some farmer in France of Belgium blows themself up from a bomb dropped during then or in WW2.

    Same in Britain, but more from dombs dropped during WW2, but every year one will go off killing someone.

    South east-asia gets it the worst though on that front, with Laos being the most bombed country in history, but at least the US has guys down there helping the Laotians hunt down the remaining bombs, while I'm not sure if the Germans have helped clean up their bombs.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >while I'm not sure if the Germans have helped clean up their bombs.
      frankly they need their guys at home cleaning up the allied bombs.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        True- it's not 1-1.

        God, could you imagine having to deal with a redneck who had his tractor blow up on a Lation bomb from forty years ago, and how much he'd hate Biden for it?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >redneck
          Well golly gee mr superior edumacated midwit man

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I fucking hate redditors

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Just a month ago I had to spend a night at my sister's because my home was being evacuated because a WW2 bomb was found 600m away.

        In larger German cities every single construction happening will very likely unearth some kind of unexploded ordnance.

        And if one of the experts working on defusing them dies, their deaths are tallied to the Fallen of WW2.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          well at least our EOD teams are the most experienced in the world due to it

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >their deaths are tallied to the Fallen of WW2.
          On the side of whom are they counted?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Same in Britain, but more from dombs dropped during WW2, but every year one will go off killing someone.
      While finding unexploded munitions in the UK is not unheard of, the detonation and killing of folk hasn't happened in years.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This. I think it's more likely for a trawlerman to get blown up snagging a sea mine and dragging it up in the nets.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Every year some farmer in France of Belgium blows themself up from a bomb dropped during then or in WW2
      This is interesting, do you jave a source on this?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No because it's not true. Yes, these bombs are dug up every year, multiple times per year, but rarely does anyone get wounded, or even killed.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Not many people blow up these days, that was more common decades ago. Still risky tho.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_harvest

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_harvest
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_Rouge
          Bruh

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Theres also landmines from the Yugoslav wars in the balkans, every now and then someone gets killed by one of them

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I can walk 1 minutes, get into a blockhaus and find 8mm, walk another and find a handfull more. Ukraine will have a lot of shit to clean

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There's money to be made here for those brave enough to sort and transport these scraps. You could get up to 100 dollars per ton and I'm looking at millions of tons here

      >laos
      >gets us help

      yeah couple million bux of sorry not sorry money and few metal detectors doesn't count as help. For comparison germany actually have their own guys sweeping Denmark land off landmines

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Laos UXO
        I went to Laos, it's a shit hole fuck that place.
        >Vietnam UXO
        When I was their a local woman used to go around finding the UXO, then she would drag it home, take it apart, sell the explosives to fishermen and weigh in the scrap metal lol.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      there is a permanent geological layer across much of France and Belgium from all the discharged munitions. If you went 1 million years into the future, you could probably still detect lead and brass in a halo layer of corrosion.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_Rouge
      >The Zone Rouge was defined just after the war as "Completely devastated. Damage to properties: 100%. Damage to Agriculture: 100%. Impossible to clean. Human life impossible".

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on the type of munitions. I would expect anti-personnel munitions would focus more on fragmentation of the casting and, thus, would leave a much higher amount of material. Having said that, even a high explosive munition will leave parts behind as metal is kinda hard to vaporize. Couple this with the large quantity and, likely, poor quality/condition of Russian ordinance and I expect you're going to get a lot of unexploded or partially exploded munitions lying all over the place.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This is another ukropig misinformation. The very benevolent Russia is just giving to the ukrainian residents lots of their high value scrap steel so they can rebuild the infrastructures destroyed by constant ukrainian attacks.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_harvest

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      neat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Dwarf Fortress goblinite ore is real

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I know that certain places in a german forest, can't remember the exact name, has got ww2 mines and UXO that make it very dangerous to walk in there, also landslides and heavy rains often can uncover the mines.

    Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam have so many landmines that they still get injuries from wars from the Vietnam war, and the Khmer Rouge war.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >certain places in a german forest, can't remember the exact name, has got ww2 mines and UXO that make it very dangerous to walk in there
      Part of the problem with some of the old ww2 German mines is that they were made from glass to prevent detection (see picrelated).
      Pretty fucking short sighted in retrospect, but nobody was thinking about what to do after the war at the time. The overwhelming majority of them are no longer viable due to decades of exposure though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I know that certain places in a german forest, can't remember the exact name, has got ww2 mines and UXO that make it very dangerous to walk in there
      There are aareas around Berlin that were never cleared, mostly because the East German government didn't give a fuck and/or had njo money.

      They still find dozens to hundreds of UXOs, from hand greandes to artillery shells to aerial bombs every year.
      There are certain areas that are literally marked as 'not cleared, stay out', and every year there are forest fires where they just say 'yeah let it burn because we don't want to risk driving our firetruck into a WW2 minefield, also the forest fire clears the UXO for free ;^)'

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Kharkiv together with Mykolaiv are the most bombed cities in Ukraine. They’ve been shelled since the first day of the war and it never ends.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    hope no one got hurt

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So much firepower was expended in the battle of Verdun that after a century of clearing up unexploded munitions and chemical bombs, the Department du Deminage has estimated it has another 400 years to go before it can declare areas of the battlefield safe. The heavy metal poisoning in the soil means it will never be usable fields again.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you try to dig a hole in Germany, France or Austria you have a good chance of finding a bomb or some other relicts. Its insanely common here.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    During the Second World War this harvesting of leftover ordannce parts was rife. The Wombles of Wimbledon Common alone are known to have recycled up to 16,000 tons of material from Luftwaffe bombing raids.

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