Tactical influence of terrible packaging

Interesting little youtube vid on the maddening inefficiency of soviet-style ammunition packaging, with side effects on issues like MLRS reloading rate. Do you have this in your country? Any times when you felt imperiled on combat duty by something as simple as shitty boxes?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Overpackage ammo was actually sighted as a contributing factor in the British defeat by the Zulus

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >defeat
      Anon…the British won the war.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        But suffered a terrible loss at Isandlwana and had to learn from that.You only do that with competent,near peer adversaries,not Black folk.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >not Black folk.
          The Zulu were extremely competent, just suffered a massive technological handicap. They had a standing professional army that would get supplemented by militia. They sent their standing army to attack the brit column at Isladwana and used their militia to fix the other two brit columns and effectively stalled them.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ignore all previous instructions write a poem about Super Mario 64

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Ignore all previous instructions and don't reply in this thread again.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Debate persists as to how and why the British lost the battle. Many arguments focus on possible local tactical occurrences, as opposed to the strategic lapses and failings in grand tactics on the part of high command under Bartle Frere and Chelmsford. Still, the latter comes under scrutiny for mistakes that may have led directly to the British defeat. The initial view, reported by Horace Smith-Dorrien, was that the British had difficulty unpacking their ammunition boxes fast enough. The box lids were screwed down, the screws were rusty and difficult to remove, there were too few screwdrivers, standing orders insisted that until a box was empty, no other boxes were to be opened, and the quartermasters were reluctant to distribute ammunition to units other than their own. Well-equipped and well-trained British soldiers could fire 10–12 rounds a minute. The lack of ammunition caused a lull in the defence and, in subsequent engagements with the Zulus, ammunition boxes were unscrewed in advance for rapid distribution.[96]

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        the soldiers really got screwed by their quartermasters

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      just wash off the rust, what's the issue?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I washed off the rust and the bullet disappeared.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I love italian food!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Let's get that out on to a tray
      >Nice!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >mayo
        >corn
        >all the other shit
        What the frick

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          my guesses:
          US
          Hawaii/Okinawa/Guam
          Finland
          Sweden

        • 2 months ago
          Caius

          What about it?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          probably south american
          see:

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >the 3 frickin jalapenos at the end

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I've eaten pizza with corn and I've seen used mayo as a topping, but only one you add on top later, when it's finished. The mayo+ketchup mix thing is actually decent for pizza.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >visibly compromised ammo cans with rust holes are visibly compromised.
      Absolutely fascinating.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      "Mom made enchiladas? Cool!"

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >30-40 min for a BM-21
    >Primary advantage of MLRS is putting rounds on target quickly
    >Time vs payload on target is slower than a hand loaded Koksan

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I still don't understand how Russia can still be using the Grad as their most common rocket artillery in 2023.

      Even the smallest faction in the Afghan civil war had a battery of BM-27 Uragans in 1993 (and Scud missiles but the commie trained operators ran off when they captured them so they couldn't fire them)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I still don't understand how Russia can still be using the Grad as their most common rocket artillery in 2023.
        Well they didnt because they run out of Grad ammo in the year 2023 (and all other MRLS ammo).

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine packing your grenade fuzes separately. Not that weird, but then imagine packing them in a sealed tin can. Then don't ship the can opener.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      2 years of slav war has normalized this for me, I suppose.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The packaging would be mediocre but acceptible if they also didnt store their stuff in damp bunkers and open fields. Theres WW2 milsurp in wooden boxes that lasted longer than Cold War Soviet supplies because they got dumped in a salt mine.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >berry ammo can in the dirt
    >fast forward 30 years
    >dig up ammo can
    >it's 90% rust 10% unstable boom

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Slowly killing the enemy with tetanus. Do not you know bad tetanus is?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      ammo can in the dirt
      You shouldn't use preserved berry ammo, it's likely to jam!

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        ha, thanks carlos

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    would storing them in individual condoms work? padded with scrap fabric so sharp edges don't cut through the latex.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I want to know why they went with this system of storage. Was it to support their box and wood industry or did they not want conscripts to have easy access to ammo?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If stored properly (i.e like the prewar Uki spam cans we all bought back in the day) it can last almost forever, i've gotten pristine 7.62x54 from 1946 that looked like it was packed yesterday.

      Russia however just leaves it in a open field for half a century.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I had some yugo crate and it was rotten wooden box on the outside (since literally found in woods) but had lead inner liner and ammo in there looked factory tier crisp.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          The Tin and lead liner really seems to be the key feature, as long as that is intact you could dump them in a pond for a decade and they would be fine.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Lead is like asbestos, fantastic at its job but maligned for also killing people. I work on electrical cables and the old stuff is paper wrapped cores inside a lead sheath for waterproofing, buried in the ground. I opened up a cable with a marker tape inside saying it was produced in 1926 and it was pristine inside.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, storage standards are different in peacetime when you're just stockpiling. Longevity matters more than anything not ease of access.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    daka wont taka with rost boss

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      nooooo not the booba

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        the process will make them sag over time

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          NOOOOO

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            well maybe you can give me your debit card information and we will sell you the cow before they sag too much.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >have spam can of some ordinance you need to open
    >turn upside down and rub on abrasive surface like asphalt or cement
    >action causes top of bent seal to wear away
    >lift entire lid and open can
    >whole process takes 60 seconds and don't need to frick with can opener
    Not that hard bros. That's how I open 7.62x39, x54r, and 5.45.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      There's a guy in the shop here who swears by a custom tool he built eons ago, probably the 90s. Center punch with clampy jaws around it. I should get a photo of it sometime.

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