Resharpenable Hand saw

Im looking for a good hand saw, and I'd hate to throw it out one day, so I've been hunting for a resharpenable one. I wanna get this one right here, but I've seen both it's not and it is resharpenable. Any suggestions on reliable hand saws? Preferably not Chinesium

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Buy a disston on eBay, get the right size triangle file and sharpen it.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    spear & jackson is the only thing in the price range.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I seen them, but the smallest they had was like 22", I'm thinking about it

      Buy a disston on eBay, get the right size triangle file and sharpen it.

      I don't wanna buy something I can't physically hold before I buy, you know?

      Head out to any flea market, estate sale, restore, or garage sale and try to find a couple old hand saw. Ideally one that has all the screw connecting the handle, (as well as an intact handle) also avoid heavy rust on the saw plate (metal blade). You probably want a crosscut saw unless your doing stock prep by hand, their going to be about 6- 8 ppi (points per inch). Also avoid block/ square handles, they're a sign of a poor quality saw. Restoration isn't hard. Rex Kruger has a video detailing how to fully restore one. I usually just separate the screws, plate and handle. Sit the plate in white vinegar (9%) overnight and use the hose/rag to clean of rust. Then give the handle and plate a light sanding, and clean the brass, reassemble and give everything a coat of paste wax. (I use beeswax and turpentine, but mix wax works great)

      Tired that, I found some, for 75 bucks a piece. Found one for 15 but it was missing teeth. Ideally I'd like something new, who knows what those saws have been through. If I find an older saw in good condition yeah I'm buying it, no luck so far.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        $75 a piece? Where the fuck are you looking? The only type of hand saw I've seen near that price are the two man logger saws. If your not in the u.s or UK it might be harder to find a good saw.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        options are:
        lol tier: harbor freight saw - so cheap they didn't induction harden it. unknown steel likely can't hold an edge.
        low end: spear & jackson
        med range: veritas, lynx, crown, pax
        high end: lie nelsen, rob cosman, bad axe, bontz, and other boutique manufactures
        that stanley is not resharpenable.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >harbor freight saw - so cheap they didn't induction harden it.
          On the plus side, good to practice sharpening on. Cheap enough that you can repeatedly fuck up on it, and not care. I got one of their flush cut pull saws for trimming a slightly warped door before selling a house. I expected it to last the one usage. That was five years ago now, and it's still going fine. It's just dumb luck though. I'd bet if you bought ten, only one would last this long.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Head out to any flea market, estate sale, restore, or garage sale and try to find a couple old hand saw. Ideally one that has all the screw connecting the handle, (as well as an intact handle) also avoid heavy rust on the saw plate (metal blade). You probably want a crosscut saw unless your doing stock prep by hand, their going to be about 6- 8 ppi (points per inch). Also avoid block/ square handles, they're a sign of a poor quality saw. Restoration isn't hard. Rex Kruger has a video detailing how to fully restore one. I usually just separate the screws, plate and handle. Sit the plate in white vinegar (9%) overnight and use the hose/rag to clean of rust. Then give the handle and plate a light sanding, and clean the brass, reassemble and give everything a coat of paste wax. (I use beeswax and turpentine, but mix wax works great)

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Look at the spear and Jackson ones, cheap and resharpenable. But you will have to reset the teeth too, since they have a mix between rip and crosscut, meaning its bad for both.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      From what I've heard spear and Jackson's will get the job done as is, if you just doing rough cutting to length, and light rip cuts, but if your cutting a lot of hardwoods it might not be the best option. Also I absolutely wouldn't recommend refiling an entire full length hand saw, especially if you haven't filed a saw before.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You can resharpen any saw with a cheap diamond nail file.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Construction side saws have shit tooth geometry.
      By the time you changed the rake the hardness is hone

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Normally you don't grind both sides of the edges on saw teeth so there should still be some hardened steel left on the remaining edge after a few sharpenings at least.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've found that the cheap induction hardened saws last a shockingly long time if all you cut is softwood lumber. Long enough that it's not really worth the money and effort to buy a resharpenable one. On the other hand, plywood, particleboard, etc. will eat saws, better off to use a carbide blade circular saw for that stuff if you can. Hardwoods tend to be somewhere in the middle and really depend on species. Teak for example is notorious for dulling blades due to its sand content.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unless as seems likely you're doing it for the ritual all tools are somewhat expendable. The way to measure everything is cost-effectiveness.

    Did it make or save you more than it cost?
    Did it enable you do do what you could otherwise not and was that sufficiently useful?

    If you inherently hate discarding what needs it kill that mental illness NOW. Go smash something that costs a bit to get it out of your system. Tools serve you not the opposite so copy industry and professionals compared to which hobbyfags (all of us) are inferior creatures.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No, you should take care of your tools. Maintenance them regularly, tools will last a life time if you do. So that they can be handed down to the next generation of craftsmen, for them to use. Hopefully they'll take good care of them too. This is why I hate disposable tools. It takes some pride and history out of it. I'm no hoarder, but it hurts me to toss a good tool I've used so much and can't do anything about it. That's why I'm looking for a resharpenable saw.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This is why I laugh at the anons on diy. You want a saw but you haven't even told us what it will be used for. Is it for cross cuts or rip cuts? Is it for dimensioning or joinery? How many tpi do you need?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Mainly cross cuts, dimensioning

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            https://www.ebay.com/itm/185510464434?hash=item2b31490bb2:g:c9AAAOSwpr9i2wl3

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        My tools exist to serve me and not the opposite. They last decades or longer anyway. The next generation can make or otherwise acquire their own. My tools exist to reduce my workload not increase it by tool worship. I collect some choice tools but cutting tools are best treated as expendable for economic reasons.

        > I'm no hoarder

        Sure you aren't. The people who use tools for production don't worship them. How precisely will my productivity be improved by adopting your autism? What will get built, repaired or modified better or quicker or both?

        Generations of craftsmen can make or mod their own gear. They are not my concern. If they want to they can become toolmakers and get precisely what they want (the reason I've a machine shop).

        It's fine to hoard but not fine to lie about why. The lies are the crazy part.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I agree with what your saying about not worshiping your tools; I do alot of rough work by hand so I'm pretty hard on mine. But I don't understand why sharpening a saw is where you draw the line of "tool worshiping". I understand that tools are supposed to serve you not the other way around, but by doing a little bit of maintenance i.e sharpening, the tools will better serve me. I don't clean and sharpen a saw for the Saws sake, I do it to make it work better.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you haven't worn out a saw you've got no business being worried about sharpening it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is a really good point. No sense adding extra work before you know it's actually necessary. Programmers call it "premature optimization".

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've returned from the antique store, second I've been to, price of a used dission, one of the lowest priced ones

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A used spear and jackson dovetail saw

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You are the biggest dumbest gorilla moron on this board

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      a good tip for ya, do not go to antique stores for tools the vendors there actually know what the stuff is worth, try flea markets and garage sales, i was lucky enough for my gramps to give me his old saws that he was about to sell for 3$ each, trust me be patient and keep looking also don't be afraid to haggle

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've had that exact hand saw in my toolbox for 25 years. I've never needed to sharpen it. I suspect it will outlast me.
    For $25, unless you plan to use it a lot, there's no point in trying to run down one that you can resharpen.
    That's a basic toolbox saw... I can safely assume you're not doing fine woodwork or you'd be buying something different.

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