Replaced garden hose faucet (old leaked).

Replaced garden hose faucet (old leaked). Problem: I wrenched the new faucet in properly so it wouldn't let water through, its outlet is pointing to the side, not directly down If I unwrench it a bit so the outlet points directly down, it leakes from between the pipe and the faucet.

Do I need a rubber ring or something?

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  1. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    You over-aped it. Get a good quality pipe dope, go slow, then stop when it faces down. Then let the dope set for a while.

  2. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Did you use teflon tape on the threads?
    I see this so fricking often I'm tempted to leave the tape in my bag. The grocery stores running garden centers are the worst. I just want to unscrew their hoses leaking all over the sidewalk and fix it.

  3. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Unthread faucet and put pipe drop and/or teflon on threads and re attach faucet moron.

  4. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I use solder connections.

  5. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can't ever backup, you can only go forward. If the threads are bottomed out then you need more tape so it stops a turn earlier and you can snug it up and stop while it's facing down

  6. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    The threads on national pipe threading, or npt threads which is basically everything you're going to run into residentially, are tapered so that when the thing you're screwing in isn't pointing in the right direction you can rent the f*** out of it and get it to point the way you need it to.
    If you have two pipe wrenches I can all but guarantee you you can keep turning that thing until it points downward. There's no way you bottomed out the threads it's just going to eventually get so hard to turn that you can't turn it anymore.
    Just keep turning it op. And definitely put thread tape on it, though backing it off and putting tape on it will work it's not going to work as long as it should the threads are designed to create a seal in and of themselves the tape is just to help out, npt threads don't seal because of pipe dope or tape they seal because the metal threads are tapered and seat against themselves the seal ideally is created by metal fitting perfectly against metal.
    You should not rely on pipe dope or thread tape for npt connections though you should still tape it or dope it to help it out.
    I like the tape because the fittings can be taken back apart and usually reused.
    Gluing that s*** together makes it a huge pain in the ass to maintenance it.
    If you look at the end of a nipple on the section that is threaded you'll see the taper that I'm talking about the diameter of the of the pipe shrinks as you move from the unthreaded portion to the end of the pipe so as you fit npt pipes together eventually it seizes, intentionally and creates a seal 99% of the time you can always get another rotation out of it if you bear down on your pipe wrench, which is by design.

  7. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    is there a way to prevent faucets from getting stolen in an outdoor setting

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >is there a way to prevent faucets from getting stolen in an outdoor setting

      laminate a job application so it's weatherproof and hide the faucet behind that.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah just copy what commercial buildings do.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        so if i just stick a ball valve with the lever removed that will cause it to not be stolen?

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Who on earth is stealing faucets?

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            third world rural youth they only like the metal ones

  8. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have a house that was built in 1990. I don't know what kind of outdoor faucets it has. I would assume that being built in 1990 it is modern enough to have the frostproof style of sillwiener that runs a foot or so behind the wall.

    All the instruction videos say you just loosen them with a wrench, and most of them have a complete basement with exposed piping in case anything breaks. I don't like how the pipe twists while attempting to loosen, especially given that there is no access to speak of, except possibly the crawlspace (literally crawling). Should I just keep attempting to loosen? Is there a chance that this was a soldered connection or something non-threaded in a non-custom home in 1990 major metropolitan USA?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      the freeze proof faucets should auto drain the foot or so length of pipe as long as the hose is disconnected is my understanding.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        It leaks though. I noticed at the end of winter, a large block of ice had formed on the outside down to the ground. I just want to replace them.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          it may be soldered on.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Your only option is to go into the crawlspace and wrench it at the connection. You don't know how long of a section of pipe it's connecting to so it could be twisting a lot, even to the point of damaging the pipe.

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