Remote control voltage output

What kind of control can I get to remotely modify the amount of voltage given to a certain appliance? For example say it's off, click once and it goes to 6 volts, again and it's 12 volts, and again and it's off. Just as an example.
Would really appreciate any ideas.

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I mean you have one input with 6v and one input with 12v, you aren't actually using the switch to drop the voltage.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I mean

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        it's like looking in a mirror

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >i mean it's like looking in a mirror
          ftfy

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >noones using sqqdot anymore

    OP u can control any voltage anywhere you like it just depends on how deep your pockets go. But your question is lacking so much detail its the equivalent of
    >i wanna go fast
    While posting a screw.
    Please op dont be a gay. Use sqqdot.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I want to control a fan with a remote, sometimes for it to go fast, sometimes slow, sometimes off. I’m not sure how to do this. I don’t know what sqqdot is and google doesn’t return anything

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        post fan

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s likely a 2-wire PC fan.
          It’s common to control them with varying amounts of voltage, although 8V is closer to “half” the CFM for some reason in my experience.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s this
          http://www.seaflo.com/en-us/product/detail/663.html

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Jeeze… it’s 6 Amps!
            How much did it cost if you don’t mind me asking.
            It looks skookum as frig.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            hey op
            To do what u want you can accomplish it with a few resistors and a relay, but its not very practical as the divider will soak your battery. You could even use a voltage regulator (and switch the programming resistor) but ull want to watch for any extra heating. It honestly depends on how that motor is wound, which isn't specified on the page. Do you already have this motor? Does it behave correctly when given half its operating voltage?
            Ignoring these dumbass boomers. and zoomers may I ask why you want to do this?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              >It honestly depends on how that motor is wound, which isn't specified on the page
              It's obviously a plain brushed DC motor, you can see it in the schematic.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Is there a reason you need the fan to be 12 volts? Like is it in an RV, or a boat, or something like that? Because if it's in your house it would be simpler and easier to just get a 120v AC inline duct fan and control the speed of it with a smartswitch dimmer.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          not on a blue board anon

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Fans are controlled by a potentiometer. That's literally what the knob on a fan that makes it go low-med-high is. Right off the bat I can imagine hooking up a microcontroller which controls a little servo that turns a potentiometer. That part would be easy, it's controlling it remotely that I don't know about, but surely connecting to a microcontroller remotely is a very well documented and easy process.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Fans are controlled by a potentiometer. That's literally what the knob on a fan that makes it go low-med-high is.
          That's literally wrong.
          Additionally, the fan OP wants to use is single speed.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >That's literally wrong.
            it's not though

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Different poster but it is wrong. AC fan motors have different windings. The knob manually switches between them

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Fans are controlled by a potentiometer.
          depends on the fan.
          computer DC fan is controlled by PCM.
          a pedestal fan is controlled by different windings in the motor. usually 3. one for each speed, or it can be controlled by a triac, but pretty much no fan is directly controlled by a POT.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >but pretty much no fan is directly controlled by a POT.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              2 speeds
              Brushless DC motor
              (brushless motors require a motor controller and can't be controlled directly with just a potentiometer)

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              literally proves me right.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get one 6v and one 12v power supply, two relays (like in pic) and a microcontroller. You can then host a simple web app on the microcontroller to switch between the relays thus switching the power supplies.
    Or you could control the microcontroller with radio signals or a infrared module and remote.
    If I was doing it id just connect the microcontroller to my smart home system controlled by home assistant. Check it out if that interests you.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Either a big variable power supply controlled by a microcontroller, or a good MOSFET on a 12V power supply (these will give you smooth control on the whole range) or is probably easier. MOSFET is the right way of doing it.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    multi-channel relay
    10A buck converter
    no spoonfeeding

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >multi-channel relay
      this will be the easiest. hook each relay to a different voltage

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Also, switch the relay in before you rectify the AC into DC.
        Ideally, you use a battery charger with a 6V/12V switch that actually changes the voltage on the primary mains windings.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >no spoonfeeding
      I changed my mind.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What is the input voltage? 12v dc? 120 ac?

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/204527113206

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I can tell you how to do it with a 2 channel relay and one power supply…but why waste my time

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *