QTDDTOT

starting this because i don't want to clutter the catalog with my dumb ass question. i am trying to plan an PrepHoleing, 4-day weekend type deal. i would ask my best friend who i usually camp with for advice but he's deployed. i'm planning on getting a tent, foam pad, sleeping bag, and solar phone charger. i already own clothes, lighter, water bottle, plenty of packed food, and a mora companion (it was on sale for like $14 and i like to get plant and mushroom cuttings) and flashlight. do i need anything else, or is it all just consumerist memes? forgive me if i forgot anything super crucial, i'm moronic (89 IQ). i don't plan on making fire. i just want to hike and sleep. it's a normie campground so i don't need water purifiers, i think. it'll be in southeast oklahoma, sunny and hitting 60F at night. good weather to not go missing? thanks in advance! 🙂

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >solar phone charger
    just get a decently sized portable battery. if you’re really out and there’s no reception, you won’t even need to charge it more than once or twice (provided your phone’s battery is decent). hell you can just go ahead and turn your phone off
    other than that you sound pretty set. should bring some sort of entertainment like a book or something so you’re not bored out of your mind if you’re not going to start a fire (though i highly recommend you do, getting a fire going and keeping it going is very fun and rewarding. plus food tastes better cooked over a fire)
    i also assume you have a decent pack to carry all this?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      thanks, that makes sense! i have a book i can bring. if i want to start a fire, would i need to get anything extra than i already listed?
      >i also assume you have a decent pack to carry all this?
      yeah, my best firend in the whole wolrd got me one for my birthday. i'm gonna use that one, he's really smart and he told me it's a good one.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if you want to start a fire you could look into buying some starter and a lighter or book of matches. you could also make your own starter but i wouldn’t recommend it unless you’re with someone experienced that can teach you how to use it properly. look into videos onto how to build a fire. start small and as the fire grows start using bigger and bigger sticks (as in, it’s kind of pointless to throw in more little sticks if your fire is big and can burn bigger sticks)
        i would also look into getting a mini stove like the AOTU on Amazon (it’s like $15 max) and some fuel for it. they’re fun to use and expands what you can make to eat by a ton (you can food in retort packages and make tea/coffee with the same boiled water). you can get a cheap aluminum pot to use with it, just don’t put it by the fire unless it’s titanium. i recommend making a “ramen bomb” for a cheap, fun, and tasty camping meal. plus it packs you with calories for those long hikes
        but as far as the essentials, i’d say you’re all set. i like your spirit anon, i hope you have an awesome time and can tell us about it afterwards

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          forgot image

          (you can reheat food in retort packages and make tea/coffee with the same boiled water)*
          oh and if you are going to make a ramen bag, use freezer bags. they can handle boiling water without being destroyed. bring a couple so you can use it as a carry-out bag too

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          okay that fire stuff sounds great i'll get matches. i have a lighter but maybe if i use it i might burn myself but i can drop a match (?) correct me if i'm wrong. i'll look at mini stoves too, because i LOVE COFFEE. this is really great advice thank you. i'll keep you guys updated and maybe take some pictures. i like your spirit too. these captchas are really hard

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >if i want to start a fire, would i need to get anything extra
        A way to create the fire obviously, a lighter, matches or ferro rod. Unless you want to try out the ferro rod, a cheap bic lighter would be my suggestion. Not necessary but great to have is wax/jute fire starter. It's cheap, light, waterproof and great at getting a fire started.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          If you're a woodworker or know a woodworker:
          1) Get a bunch of sawdust
          2) buy paraffin wax and those little paper dixie cups.
          3) Put the wax (obviously melt it) in the cup with the sawdust.
          I've started fires in torrential downpours using one of these. You don't really need them in summer but fall or spring they come in handy.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can these heat a hunting shed in the dead of winter?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah. Pretty easy in fact. Keeping it fed is the hard part because it can basically only take kindling and you gotta keep feeding it constantly vs a bigger one that can fit a proper lot. So someone's gotta be awake if it's truly gonna get cold at night.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    . This Kelty tent I can get at a discount, and while the colorway is obnoxious 1973, I like the sturdy materials and included foot print and star gaze fly. What do you anons think, any other suggestions? I would use it for backpacking but only a few days at most., so even though it is almost 6 lbs I don't really care as I am not a twink and I don't cover more than 12 miles a day on my weekend trips.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Excessive for solo backpacking. The number in a Kelty tent name is how many people it fits.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        what [...] said
        you might think "oh the extra space would be nice" but it adds a ton of weight to your pack, trust me. made that mistake after trying to haul around a 2-person tent i borrowed from my brother-in-law everywhere. do it enough times and it'll convince you that maybe those utlralight guys are onto something

        i disagree with those guys, maybe a 3 is excessive but i enjoy the space of a two person, especially in bad weather, I can fit all my shit in and still stretch and sit comfortably

        I was thinking that the bigger size would be worth the weight. I am about 6'3, 240lbs, and I normally go out with my dog and sometimes women (female) when I find one. Kelty makes a two version tent of this, but I feel that two people (one being my large ass), a dog, and gear would be a tight fit.

        they make single person shelters with plenty of space at the head and foot. what else are you going to keep in there besides your pack and maybe one or two miscellaneous items?
        the wider space is indeed a luxury, but that's exactly what it is; a luxury. if you intend to spend most of your time outside of the tent, i'd rather have the two or three extra pounds given to something like a chair

        I live in the PNW, don't need a chair much as there are a bazillion logs and stumps to sit on but not a bad idea anon.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Olypen Chad checking in
          I bought a Z-Seat on sale for 20 bucks and it was the best investment I ever made. It's a doormat for my tent and a seat cover for wet or snow covered logs that I want to sit on and not get my ass muddy or wet.

          It weighs nothing.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what

      Excessive for solo backpacking. The number in a Kelty tent name is how many people it fits.

      said
      you might think "oh the extra space would be nice" but it adds a ton of weight to your pack, trust me. made that mistake after trying to haul around a 2-person tent i borrowed from my brother-in-law everywhere. do it enough times and it'll convince you that maybe those utlralight guys are onto something

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Then you might think
        >2-3 lbs isn't that much more weight
        then you realize it is.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i disagree with those guys, maybe a 3 is excessive but i enjoy the space of a two person, especially in bad weather, I can fit all my shit in and still stretch and sit comfortably

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        they make single person shelters with plenty of space at the head and foot. what else are you going to keep in there besides your pack and maybe one or two miscellaneous items?
        the wider space is indeed a luxury, but that's exactly what it is; a luxury. if you intend to spend most of your time outside of the tent, i'd rather have the two or three extra pounds given to something like a chair

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I have a Mesa 4 that I love. A bigger tent is so much nicer when you got your women or dog coming with you. My Mesa 4 fits me and my wife plus dog without issues. I don't have a problem carrying it but I'm at like a 50lb pack since I only ask my wife to carry her water and maybe some freeze dried meals.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There are a lot of videos on YouTube in which people show the gear they took on camping trips.
    "Homemade Wanderlust" is a girl that is not annoying and has a lot of YouTube videos. "Kyle Hates Hiking" is an informative channel. "Kelly Hays Hikes" is informative but she is very minimalist in the gear she takes on long hikes.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can anyone recommend me an ultra-light backpacking tent and mattress? will be taking on a plane so dimensions are critical

    >picrel

    if picrel didn't have to be held up with hiking poles and came with a sun cover I would buy instantly

    >cover is $200

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What size hammock is good for a 6ft man? And do people have recommendations for hammocks with the following?
    >Fits me
    >Light
    >Integrated bugnet
    I'm also curious about underquilts. What's good for night temps between 0 and 10c?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You'll be fine in any 11ft hammock. Underquilts by most cottage vendors will be reasonably accurate to rating. UQs vary in design more than bags so worth some research and maybe questions to the manufacturer. Dutchware, superior gear, etc all have integrated bug net options. You'll probably save the most weight by going for a normal width fabric and choosing light hanging hardware.

      [...]
      [...]
      I was thinking that the bigger size would be worth the weight. I am about 6'3, 240lbs, and I normally go out with my dog and sometimes women (female) when I find one. Kelty makes a two version tent of this, but I feel that two people (one being my large ass), a dog, and gear would be a tight fit.
      [...]
      I live in the PNW, don't need a chair much as there are a bazillion logs and stumps to sit on but not a bad idea anon.

      That will be a question of how many times you're out with a dog or woman. I have a 2p for car camping and short hikes with the lady, but I have a 1p lightweight shelter for my solo trips which are generally much longer distances. How much backpacking are you interested in vs how much is she or the dog do? Not worth the 3p if they only go as far as a day hike at a state park campground, could get a cheap Coleman to fill that role

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Almost always out with the dog. I also just dislike 1p tents as my shoulders touch the sides and I get claustrophobic, so the smallest I would do is a 2p. I have an ancient 8 person coleman I use for car camping that works great; the weight difference between that kelty 2p and 3p is like a lb so I may just do the 3person at this rate. Distances for me max out at around 40 miles round trip as I don't really backpack as far as some people.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Super helpful, thanks anon

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    any PNW residents have a particular recommendation for waterproof pants? torn between carhartt double duck and 5.11 larp, but open to other suggestions. bonus if built-in adjustable waistband (i usually have to size up for ass purposes and belts weigh)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What are you using them for?
      I've lived in the PNW all my life and I have a pair of marmot gortex I bought for rain but end up only useing for cold weather and a poncho I use for heavy rain.

      I don't really know how to explain this to people not from here or newbies to the PNW but the only time you need rain pants is for fishing. Most of the year it's too warm to wear non breathable raingear on the hikes because all the good hikes are up the sides of mountains.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        really--i was under the impression that hiking in olympic (haven't been yet) and rainier (was there in dec) would benefit from waterproof pants but what you're saying makes sense. i wore jeans in rainier and the soaked ferns on denim is not fun. what pants do you use to hike? storm season is coming here in OK and i'm moving to WA next march, wanted to get the jump on hike-appropriate rain gear.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You'll laugh but I hike in leggings and when I gain elevation and if/when the temperature drops I have a pair of synthetic/windbreaker pants that go on over the leggings. It breaths very well and is incredibly warm. I have an pair of polypropylenes I'll use for spring and fall when it's 60 at the trailhead but 30 at the summit... they go on before the windbreaker pants.

          In a hellish downpour I pull out the poncho. You do need shoe gators though--the mud is a b***h.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            based lululemonmaxxing. thanks for the tip

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I get the leggings for like 6 bucks at a thrift store. I discovered woman wear something like once or never wear it if it doesn't fit right before they get rid of it. All my leggings are look new and they're all thrift store finds.

              No one gives a shit on the trail--on the rare occasion I actually see people on the trails I hike.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                women are so silly i love them.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You're going to get wet in the PNW no matter what you're wearing. During mushroom season I soak through "water proof" and "water resistant" pants in about three hours of pushing through ferns. If I wear proper gortex or membrane rain gear I still get wet because I start sweating heavily.
      My advice to you is to get in the mindset that you're just going to be wet. Plan on day outings ending when you're soaked through and the chill starts setting in once you stop moving around so much. On longer trips, bring dry bags and change at the end of the day and make a point to dry your wet gear out before you need another dry outfit.
      Super pro tip, bring a cot in the wet season, which is at least 6 months out of the year. There's no good way to keep the water out of a tent and as much as I hate cots it's better than waking up cold and wet at 3am.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have picrel. I've taken it camping many times. I use it to charge my phone, my micro air pump/lamp, head lamp and one of those horse shoe shaped fans that you wear around your neck. I keep the solar panel open and in the sun during the day and charge all of my devices at night. I've never had the battery go below 50% even on week long trips. I've heard the single panel ones can't get enough sun to stay charged, but couldn't say personally. But my multi panel one stays charged.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anybody aware of a "universal" axe head sheath that comes with a small pouch to store a sharpening puck and a small bottle of oil?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's called an axe handbang, sweetie.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        there are easier ways to say you have no idea

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Bakki kun amma mana fincaanii kooti.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    how do you set up a tent in downpour? what is a footprint/tarp for? is it really necessary?
    i tried setting up a tent in some medium rain and the tarp got soaked, tent got soaked, gear got soaked, i know i'm moronic, but what do non-morons do?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The footprint goes between the ground and the floor of the tent to protect it from abrasion and punctures. If it's raining when you set up the tent it will get wet. You can practice setting up faster or wait in a dryish place for the rain to calm down, but sometimes you just end up sleeping in wet gear no matter what.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        thank you i love you anon

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >End up sleeping in wet gear nonmatter what
        I live where it rains allot--this isn't true at all.

        how do you set up a tent in downpour? what is a footprint/tarp for? is it really necessary?
        i tried setting up a tent in some medium rain and the tarp got soaked, tent got soaked, gear got soaked, i know i'm moronic, but what do non-morons do?

        Get a freestanding tent that has mostly external clips. I can have my tent up with the tarp on in less than 4 minutes and my pack has a pack cover. I've never gone to bed wet.

        You also want to "read the storm." If you can (which is more common than not) you can wait for the lull in the rain and set up then.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Another option is a 'fly-first' tent. They tend to be not free-standing trekking pole tent. There's also always tarping as an option.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Walkgay reporting in. I just got my first bike and have started to learn how to ride it, but I need a lock. I live in a comfortable white suburb but I'm still not comfortable leaving it around when I go out. What's the best lock/ brand that you bikegays would recommend? I don't want to get some shitty cheap stuff that can be broken with a pair of pliers.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      try to find a lock that has a mesh cut-proof fabric on the outside. don't have a link, but my buddy showed me his and all his family's bikes have been stolen except his. his lock has a bunch of marks on it from where people would try to cut the mesh and it just wouldn't give. im no expert though, wait for someone who knows what they're talking about to reply b4 u buy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I've had the same kryptonite evolution U bike lock the past 15 years, 10 of which I was bike commuting and locking my bike up in public, downtown almost every day. I live in a city and never had my bike stolen. Make sure to lock through the front wheel.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I wouldn't overthink it, any U lock is going to be pretty hard to cut without huge, heavy duty bolt cutters, if you need more flexibility and range for whatever you're chaining up to then get a metal chain made out of marine grade stainless steel and a big, tough padlock.
      Like this guy says

      I've had the same kryptonite evolution U bike lock the past 15 years, 10 of which I was bike commuting and locking my bike up in public, downtown almost every day. I live in a city and never had my bike stolen. Make sure to lock through the front wheel.

      kryptonite is a good brand but if you can find a cheaper U lock at a hardware store or online then get that.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How do you get the courage to camp alone?
    I'm too worried at night about dangerous animals or other people to enjoy it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >dangerous animals
      check if there are any first, then worry later
      >other people
      they arent going to rob you dude
      just go out slowly, do a 1 nighter a few times then a 2 nighter etc

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    does this design work? the built in pot stand would be great

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i tried it with the regular can opening, it couldn't get enough oxygen and put itself out. i tried cuttinga larger hole, with and without a cermic wool wick, and after 10 mins it still hadn't primed.
      never made my own before, been using a trangia for years. saw this design on twitter and thought i'd give it a go

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Oh. Cola can stoves need vents. You gotta buckle the top half so it's not making an airtight seal with the bottom, or you can cut holes, that's usually the most popular way but I never have. I always do mine like this. But the holes style are better for a smaller pot.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          ah i see, yeah that makes sense. i'll give it another go. i know there's lots of designs out there, would be fun to try them all out. thanks

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm going caming in Sweden with a friend soon and am looking for a good stove. We'll be mostly travelling by car but will also go on a few overnight hikes in the national parks. The models I'm looking at are the Coleman 424 and the Primus Omnifuel. The Coleman I like because it's comfier and has two flames, the Primus because it also runs on Diesel (as does my car) and is very light. Can you help me out here?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if you are in a car, the one on right is easier.
      the primus one is easy to knock over and annoying to cook on.
      however, carrying the coleman in a backpack sucks.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks for the insight. I have now gone ahead and bought the Coleman. Guess it'll be deenz for the hiking portions then.

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How long can I use picrel for without actually taking a shower/jumping in lake/pool/hottub?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      we've been using that stuff on my bed-ridden dad once a week for 2 or 3 years now. i'm not sure how clean he is though. the nurses who visit regularly don't complain about his cleanliness.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Cool, I used it every other day for about 3 weeks. It works pretty good, gets rid of smells, works better than just wet wipes, I have no idea where all of the sweat and oils and BO stank and frumunda cheese went but it seemed to have been cleaned away

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I realized while looking into diy hammocks, the usual size of fabric you'd use for a basic gathered end hammock (about 11' x 5') happens to be just about the right size for some of the simpler ancient cloaks. Specifically, the Greek Himation, and Roman Pallium are both simple rectangles of almost exactly that size. How moronic of an idea would it be to use a piece of wool heavyweight wool as both my hammock and my top layer while hiking and camping? In this scenario I'd still be using a normal hammock setup of tarp, bugnet, and top/underquilt.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      2 things against this. First: your top layer cant be set up in camp if you want your cloak. That means that neither can the quilts or net. If you know anything about hammocks, you'll be fiddling with set-up for 20min before bed, probably in the dark.
      Second I don't know if a wool fabric would be a good choice for a hammock body. I feel like you'll just pull the fibers apart a ruin a perfectly good cloak.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is there an archive for PrepHole? Warosu, tbharchive and 4plebs don't archive it and I don't know about any other sites.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Looking to put pic related on my car for mounting kayaks + cargo bins, and there are no rails on the car for mounting a standard rack.
    Good idea, or is it going to fall apart once I get to freeway speeds?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      will be fine if properly installed

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    imagine getting mad at a month old post. I’ve brought my two-person tent on multiday trips in many places across the US with lots of elevation gain. I also sometimes don’t bring a tent at all, and sometimes I bring just a tarp. are you also going to say its impossible to bring the extra weight of a fishing pole 3k ft up to a high alpine lake? I do that regularly too

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >two person tent
    >heavy
    Gets me every time, kek

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Undeveloped land is very cheap, and the tax is cheap.
    Is there any reason why I shouldn't buy cheap land for conservation as an absentee owner, to protect it from development? I'm in USA, for reference.
    I could camp on it. I could later decide to sell it or use it agriculturally, or it could serve as a backup site for mobile home if I get priced out of urban housing.
    There's no law saying I have to develop land that I buy, is there?
    The worst I can anticipate is squatters or trespassing vandals damaging wildlife while I live in the city, but it's improbably and recoverable.
    Has anybody done this?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      absentee owning land and preventing development isn’t conservation. conservation requires active work like research, invasive removals, plantings of natives, and usage of fire or responding to wildfire. a better way to conserve land is to buy it and then donate it or work out some shared ownership deal with an org like the nature conservancy

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Recently transitioned over to a propane firepit because I'm tired of buying overpriced wood and hauling it. It's a small setup with a 5 lb propane tank. I live in an apartment and don't have outside storage for the tank, so my plan was to use it all or bleed it empty before returning home and storing it in doors. Everything I see about propane storage says not to store it indoors, even when empty. I should be alright to keep it inside, right? Even if there are residuals, the amount would be so small to not be an issue.

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