Pond Drain

Hello all,

My home has a large pond on it and the overflow/spillway pipe seemed to have lost its top or broken off or some many years ago. It needs to be about 18 inches higher to get back to the height it originally was. I have zero idea how it completely disappeared but it is GONE. There is also a crack in the very top which I assume was where it broke off. I pulled some twigs away and it started draining a little.

So I need some type of drop in pipe extension I can set on top that or affix somehow so that the water level can come back up 18 inches. Any ideas? All my local pond stores and builders only do little koi ponds and decorative ponds. This is a few acre fish pond. TIA!

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We can't help you because we're all larpers

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is an outdoor recreation forum right? This is directly related to fishing and homesteading. I assume some of you older gentlemen like myself have some acreage and might have some knowledge on this subject.

      I mean, I guess I could call up the local university agriculture/fisheries extension. Before I acquired the land, the state government paid half to have it installed. It's along a waterfowl migration route.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This board is trash, DIY might be better for this. I'd help but I have no experience with ponds, my first thought was to temporarily block the water around it somehow or to wait for the level to lower during summer and oxy weld a length of pipe.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I was hoping I didn't have to weld. Thanks.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe inserting a long, slightly smaller pipe into it and sealing the gap with clay would work too.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              If they fitted well enough clay would not be needed, in hindsight.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              That was more along what I was thinking. A slightly larger diameter pipe with a crimped end I could set in there. Might need to secure with bolts but it would have to be long lasting and not leak too much.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You'd be better off with stick or flux core on something as rusty as that pipe, which fortunately for OP are the easiest methods of welding.
          All he'll need to do is get a new section of pipe the length he wants, drain the pond, and weld the new pipe on. Doesn't matter how it looks, it'll be underwater, just hit it with some boat paint and forget about it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It's hard heavy pipe. Built in 1978.

            Two pieces of pipe, one the same diameter as the original, and one that's a tight slip fit either inside or outside. Cut the first piece to the length you need and use the second one to connect the two together.

            Might try something like that and see if someone can fabricate that. I want it to be heavy as hell too to it doesn't shift in ice. Or whatever the hell banged into the first one.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >It's hard heavy pipe. Built in 1978.
              So? Heavier means it's easier to weld.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wait I mean same diameter but one end is crimped a few inches so it sets inside.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you not have a single blue collar friend?
    Are you too good for people with no degree?
    Call a plumber you elietist shetbeg, this is easy shit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >plumber

      Uh... I think you may be a bit off the mark there friendo.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Not at all
        This is an easy task for a plumber
        Do you think we just unclog toilets?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I never thought of you on the scale of this. If it is true, my apologies.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Two pieces of pipe, one the same diameter as the original, and one that's a tight slip fit either inside or outside. Cut the first piece to the length you need and use the second one to connect the two together.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Try DIY anon. They can be helpful on occasion.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The only permanent and maintenance free solution to something like this is welding. There's too much pitting for a coupling so it would always drain back to the coupled section every few months when the Black person rigging fails.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you could slip a 12" pipe over it and set the top at the correct elevation

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      picrel
      godspeed pondanon

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >no, goy metal is evil and toxic, you want to use my *wrings hands* safe... plastic.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Will consider. Thanks. Metal is heavier even in water I have zero knowledge of welding but that may work for quite awhile

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >I have zero knowledge of welding
          And you refuse to learn for what reason?
          This is literally the perfect project.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Silicone sealant I reckon

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Storm water pipes from a drainlaying/plumbing supply store.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Interesting. And the pvc won't crack and break when the pond freezes over?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It will, and it will also get damaged by UV which will make it crumble in a few years.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I've never seen a downpipe on a house crack in just a few years. You use proper drain laying shit not just shitty PVC It's designed to cope with storm water pressure and not break. It should handle freezing temps as well.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    JB weld and a steel plate on top

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