Large caliber revolver or autoloader for bear protection?

Large caliber revolver or autoloader for bear protection?

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Super massive power is not required if you look at the statistics. I'm a huge revolvergay but it's pretty damn hard to argue with a glock 20 when it comes to bear defense handguns. It carries easier, it has a lot more capacity if you miss a lot under stress, it's easier to shoot well than a super hot magnum, and it is proven effective even for polar bears as it is what the Danish Sirius Patrol carries instead of 9mms.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Vortex Nation Podcast
    Ep. 330 | 9mm vs. 10mm - Bear Defense Breakdown

    Very interesting& informative pod, with some ballistic tests I haven't seen elsewhwre regarding defense. Obviously they test autoloaders, but they do talk about revolvers. My 2 cents? I'd go with an autoloader, probably 10mm or 45acp. The frick-huge revolver calibers are gonna cause you to flinch& maybe miss in a tense high-adrenaline bear attack

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I really like my big bore revolvers, and I enjoy shooting them, but weather or not to use it for bear defense is less about the revolver and more about the relative comfort level of whoever’s shooting it. Right now I’d take my Alaskan, but I’ve run close to 500 rounds of 454 through it (didn’t bother counting the 45lc, but usually got a box of 50 for every box of 20 454).. I’m very familiar with it and very confident. I’ve practiced shooting it fast as a double action…. My only experience getting to shoot 10mm was 10 rounds through a g20, followed by 10 through a g40. With no practice I was able to put them all on paper at about 30 feet.. to be fair I felt like the recoil was negligible but I have a lot of practice dealing with recoil so your mileage may vary.. basically if you have a huge revolver and are familiar with shooting it then yeah it’s great for bear defense. If your looking to get something for bear defense and have no experience with bigger stuff then maybe try shooting it at a rental range before you commit.. if you try a 44 and it feels like a lot of recoil, then I can assure you a 454 or 500 magnum is not gonna be controllable without some expensive practice.. don’t trust your life to something your not confident with… theirs a reason most shooters who try a big bore shoot a couple rounds and call it good…

      The flinching is tough to beat. I’ve let a lot of people shoot my guns and universally the first shot goes better than the second.

      Big frickoff revolvers are made for bear hunting, not bear defense

      Technically The snubnoses are specifically for bear defense..

      >If you're really worried about bears, better to use a big-bore AR, battle rifle, or shotgun with slugs first.
      True but ehen I'm hiking I don't want to lug around a long gun, I want a handy side piece

      The snubnose big bores are only handy compared to full length revolvers.. they’re hard to carry in a normal belt holster and they weigh a lot…

      whatever you shoot best and feel the most comfortable with. the hardcast flat-nosed bullets that work best on bears don't really care about muzzle energy, as long as they've got enough momentum to penetrate to the vitals. the only real question is whether you can land the right hit in time to save your life. I'd want a high capacity autoloader with a red dot in the minimum caliber I trusted, maybe even a 9mm loaded with buffalo bore, for the maximum number of chances to ding that off button between the eyes

      I do think the big bore stuff gets a better chance of blowing out joints and chewing up flesh, But again, if your not used it good fricking luck.

      TLDR use what your comfortably able to handle and practice regularly

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Big frickoff revolvers are made for bear hunting, not bear defense

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Whatever you shoot best with as long as you get a heavy bullet. If you're really worried about bears, better to use a big-bore AR, battle rifle, or shotgun with slugs first.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >If you're really worried about bears, better to use a big-bore AR, battle rifle, or shotgun with slugs first.
      True but ehen I'm hiking I don't want to lug around a long gun, I want a handy side piece

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >If you're really worried about bears, better to use a big-bore AR, battle rifle, or shotgun with slugs first.
      I was thinking the same thing. If you're going into bear country, it's socially acceptable to carry a rifle. I would go with something in .375 h&h minimum.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    whatever you shoot best and feel the most comfortable with. the hardcast flat-nosed bullets that work best on bears don't really care about muzzle energy, as long as they've got enough momentum to penetrate to the vitals. the only real question is whether you can land the right hit in time to save your life. I'd want a high capacity autoloader with a red dot in the minimum caliber I trusted, maybe even a 9mm loaded with buffalo bore, for the maximum number of chances to ding that off button between the eyes

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Auto loader
    >can mount a weapon light
    >can mount red dot
    >handles like your 9mm
    >more than 6 shots

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        SOVL

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    AK or battle rifle

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I carry a dinky .38 for black bears and mountain lions. Besides, I've never seen one.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Whatever. Animals aren't bulletproof.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just get a 10mm glock but having a frick huge 500 magnum sounds awesome

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I vote for a 44 magnum revolver

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Medium caliber in a large frame revolver. Ruger Redhawk in .357mag is built like a tank so you can shoot spicy rounds of frick off. And have 8 rounds to make sure it stays fricked off. All while having the weight of the gun help tame muzzle rise.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My old man who still lives in Alaska and goes sheep hunting etc carries a snubby Ruger Alaskan 454 casull in a chest rig in case of grizz

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *