It's over

https://www.neurology.org/doi/10.1212/WNL.0000000000204407

I'm someone who annually (or semi-annually, depending on a bunch of factors) hunts wild cervids, particularly caribou and moose, and I've been keeping a beady eye on the CWD epidemic in North America waiting for the day that zoonosis inevitably occurred. It seems that it may have happened.
It's over. It's never been more over. In fact, it's so over that I've been sitting here with my head in my hands uttering "It's over" in a very over-exaggerated French accent so that it sounds like "It is Auvergne."
But my question is: In PrepHole's opinion, just how Auvergne is it? What do you all reckon is going to happen here? And will you change your hunting behaviour as a result?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What a waste of Masonic diggers.

    Anyway, can you test for CWD in the field or before consuming? Are there cooking methods to kill the prions?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >kill prions
      Good luck, anon.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        So no, huh? Well frick. Depending on how long before symptoms appear after consuming, you could feed portions to your frenemies...seriously out of ideas here. OP might be right it's l'ovoure.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Prions are durable proteins, more durable than the base proteins they corrup, so cooking until the prions are destroyed turns the meat into ash.
          You can send a head into be tested. The U of M has a test that takes only 4 hours to administer, but Minnesotans kill 170,000-200,000 deer per year, so it’s obviously not exactly feasible to test every deer unless massive investments are made in testing laboratories.

          So don’t eat deer that look like shit.
          Don’t eat deer from herds with sick members.
          Kill and test all the sick deer you see.
          And kill more deer period. The only way to get ahead of something like this is drastically reduce herd density and keep the density low for probably a couple decades.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Is the U of M test the only place available nationwide? As this blooms will other states implement testing protocols and locations?

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Other states have testing programs, but AFAIK Minnesota's the most aggressive. We even had special "kill them all" seasons for a couple of areas where it was being found at concerning frequency. But of course all of the boomers were pissy that people were being told to kill without regard for "quality deer management practices" in special no limit bonus seasons, and participation was a fraction of what it should have been.
              If your state gives you the opportunity to do something like that, go kill as many deer as you can even if it's all going to the landfill, the future of the sport depends on robust action now. I killed 9 deer in the last special CWD season, and while none of mine tested positive, I only saved the meat from two because I didn't have the space to safely store enough possibly contaminated meat to utilize it all. I don't feel bad about the waste, demolishing that herd was the only sensible choice.

              Frankly, they should revoke the licenses for the people raising deer on farms, it's their dumbfrickery that caused this issue. Currently they don't take the license unless CWD is found in the wild in that county or the herd at that particular farm is tested positive.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Good info. Maybe state's Game and Fish depts could offer incentives like reduced costs for tags on "kill-em-all" years.

                Would definitely do my part if my state offers it.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Nooooo but where will I get my venison jerky sticks they sell at Cabela's that literally just taste like a fricking $9 slim jim when they take away the deer farming license?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                how it even started in first place?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                In cows it was frickwad farmers feeding their cattle ground up leftovers of their own butchered kin. This is why cannibalism is taboo. Same thing could have happened with farmed deer, which then could have infected wild deer. Problem with CWD is that it can spread through urine and the prions can remain infectious for a long ass time in the soil.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >In cows it was frickwad farmers feeding their cattle ground up leftovers of their own butchered kin.
                they should be fricking executed

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not super well versed in the matter because I've only done cursory research on it, so I can't say for sure. I do know that since prions are not living organisms, but misfolded proteins which prompt other proteins to misfold when they come into contact therefore destroying the building blocks of your tissues, there isn't a way to test for them without getting ahold of tissues from an infected animal and waiting for a lab to come back with results. By that point, your meat would have to be frozen to keep it from going bad while you wait for the results which means possibly contaminating other things in the meantime.
      Prions seem to be extremely, inordinately difficult to destroy and are easily picked up by animals which share similarly shaped proteins in their tissues. From what I understand, that's what often keeps animal prion diseases from crossing over to humans as there exist a few known prion diseases that only affect animals (i.e. scrapie) and they're not a problem until they manage to infect a human being (like mad cow disease or kuru) at which point they could prove to be an extremely difficult thing to contain.

      digits confirm it's over.

      My god, it is Auvergne les gars

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Prion diseases are fascinating

        my favorite is fatal familial insomnia

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Prions
        they come from space

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Are there cooking methods to kill the prions?
      Nope. You could burn the food to ash and there's still a chance the prions might be intact.
      You can blame thermodynamics for this. Infectious prions are naturally in a lower energy state than normal prions (which are present in all animals) and something about that state enables them to act as a catalyst to make normal prions also go into that lower energy state. And because they are in a lower energy state, they are more stable than any other proteins, and require a LOT more energy to denature.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      > Are there…methods to kill the prions?
      No. The giant washing machines they use to clean medical equipment (called autoclaves) cannot even kill prions. Prions are misfolded proteins and they cannot be stopped.
      >My god, it is Auvergne les gars
      Mon Dieu, c’est Auvergne les gars

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is bait. Are you actually moronic enough to try and eat a visibly ill animal?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Its not always visible anon, only in the late stages is it obvious

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This how ~~*They*~~ are going to get us rednecks who wouldn't take the COVID shots.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Honestly the CWD maps are bullshit. It's all determined by beurecrats

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    digits confirm it's over.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >zombie deer
    >glowBlack person ticks
    >vaccinated meat
    >industrial society
    >quads
    Let us become as self-sufficient as possible before shit truly hits the fan, godspeed

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >zombie deer pisses on your tomatos and that you and your family then eat
      Wat do then?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It was a good run, I guess.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What caused this disease?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Deer farmers using contaminated feed, and contact between the wild herds and the confined herds.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well, frick.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Let's hope it's genetic and they were actually related because at least one of their mothers was a prostitute.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Apocalyptic digits, bros
    What's gonna be the best wat to avoid prions? Avoiding the consumption of mammals entirely and watching gardens like a hawk for squirrels that wanna piss on your goods?

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    first time in PrepHole
    As a person who has never hunted before, does this have any change to personally affect me? How virulent are prion diseases?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i'm curious about that as well. wouldn't the potentially human-transmissible variant die out quickly due to the fatal nature of the disease?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Prion disease is always fatal, not just in humans. It spreads, because the incubation period is years, during which the infected animal spreads the prions around. Even after death, the prions from the carcass can get back into the environment and into new hosts.

        first time in PrepHole
        As a person who has never hunted before, does this have any change to personally affect me? How virulent are prion diseases?

        If you are not eating venison, probably won't concern you. If you want to hunt and your local deer population is infected, it's something to think about. It seems like a very low risk atm, but who knows, really. There could already be hundreds of infected humans and we wouldnt know until they get symptoms.

        >had been eating zombie deer regularly
        we developed sentience for nothing if people like this exist

        They were not eating symptomatic CWD deer. You can eat an infected animal that doesnt show any signs yet and ingest prions without knowing.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >It spreads, because the incubation period is years
          Which means there could be thousands of people infected with CWD by now.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >had been eating zombie deer regularly
    we developed sentience for nothing if people like this exist

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >the deer have spike prot-I mean, prions

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Prions and parasites are serious fears of mine when it comes to eating meat. I wanted to get into hunting this year and hearing this news terrifies me.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Well, this only really applies to cervids so other animals should be alright for the most part. At the very least when it comes to parasites (which, if you hunt for long enough, you will invariably encounter and consume) you can largely avoid issues by making sure to thoroughly cook your food. This is especially true of predator animals or animals that regularly consume other animals, but it's a good general rule to follow with all wild game. Prions can't really be helped, but if you happen to be exposed it's still not 100% that you'll end up with a prion disease. But if you get exposed and infected, you're guaranteed to be fricked and you likely won't know it for nearly a decade.

      It should be emphasized that bear, particularly bear, should always be cooked all the way through. Consuming bear meat anything other than well done gives you a preeeeetty good chance of trichinosis which I wouldn't recommend getting unless you like parasite eggs in your muscle fibres.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Look up water "cremation"

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    time to go vegetarian haha

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Find a fast, effective method of curing prion disorders might be the only thing close to the gravity of finding a cure for all forms of cancer.
    >Can't be destroyed by cooking
    >Infected animal spreads it for years before it shows sickness
    >The prion lasts for over 20 years outside the body
    This is quite possibly the true zombie epidemic.

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Goodbye to America's meat export market for a while I guess

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >getting an incurable prion disease to own the israelites
    homie there are easier ways to cure trichinosis of the brain than turning it into a soup of misfolded proteins

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not a big deal. I used to collect tissue samples from roadkill deer and did lab testing for CWD. I'll let y'all know if I get it.

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if this is true the whole city they live in needs to be nuked and thats our only hope

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I wouldn't be surprised if the prion is still intact anyway after the fact.

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I stopped buying ranched elk from a Wisconsin farmer I liked because his herd is literally surrounded by CWD deer -- total hotspot. The midwest is massively contaminated.

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is there theories on the endgame with CWD?
    Assuming people can avoid eating obviously ill deer and it doesn't spread to humans in a meaningful way, what will eventually happen with the deer/ungulate population?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Can't tell. No way of knowing yet if it will jump from deer species to things like cows or other such. Among ungulates I have severe concerns for the moose population. It might end up being a total extinction. Some areas have up to 30% infection rates. Might be time to give some north American fauna the zoo breeding program treatment so they can be reintroduced a few generations from now.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Now, that said. Sheep have a similar prion disease called scrapie that's been around since at least the 1700s. It doesn't jump to humans like mad cow. It shows up every year, but is well managed in domestic populations via cremation. So it's no big problem. But those are monitored controlled populations. Deer aren't. It's an itchy feeling in the back of my head trying to guess its course.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    simple, just go PrepHole until you have https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/alpha-gal/index.html

    definitely not engineered by big corn and big onions to ensure a smooth transition from our last vestiges of hunter gatherer-isms into their world of human cattle fed the minimum viable plant nutrition; definitely do not worry about this or look into it

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How does this effect natural predators? Is there any research on impact on wolves and bears that live in affected regions?

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