Is there a point in prepping if you live in the suburbs?

Is there a point in prepping living in the burbs? I have a few guns, an ar, maybe a couple 100 rounds of ammo for each gun. I was thinking about getting a go bag and all this other shit but really I live in a city of 200k and unless you drive 90 minutes you are going to be in high density places.

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

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250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Z

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why would you leave in the event of an emergency? Just have a few months of provisions in case society goes off the rails. Your "go bag" should be in your car and should be configured to get you home.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Everything about prepping/survival is situational except for the absolute basics like having a couple weeks of food/water at home and first aid supplies. You have to figure the rest out based on where you live, your situation, and what sort of threats you expect to face. When you have answered those questions you can work out scenarios which make sense for you and you can prepare accordingly.

    Location matters: who is around you, what resources are around you, what means of travel are required?
    Your situation matters: Do you have kids & family along or is it just you? If you have others with you are they fit or are they old, young, sick, etc? Or can they help in some way?
    What are you preparing for? Tornadoes out in the sticks? Riots in a big city?
    What are your external resources: friends in other states you can stay with? does your family have a cabin innawoods? What are your transportation options--do you own or have access to vehicles? Think about all that stuff. Figure if and when it makes more sense for you to "bug in" or "bug out". Make your own decisions based on your situation.

    Also, don't forget skills. Gear and prepping doesn't mean shit if you have no idea how to use those things. Lots of people fall into the trap of thinking "If I just buy this checklist of stuff then I'll be OK". Your knowledge is a lot more important than what gear you consooomed.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Quality post

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah solid rundown of the basics, though also:
      >Also, don't forget skills. Gear and prepping doesn't mean shit if you have no idea how to use those things. Lots of people fall into the trap of thinking "If I just buy this checklist of stuff then I'll be OK". Your knowledge is a lot more important than what gear you consooomed.
      And to add emphasis, PRACTICE. Even if you do have some skill from other walks of life, you should still actually practice with the stuff you get. Or conversely and even more so, if you don't have skills you can and must make up for it with practice. Read the manual. Spend a bit of time once per month going through a list. Like if you have a little portable camping stove, boil water and make your morning coffee or whatever with it once per month at least. Figure out ways to just make it part of the routine.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Also don't forget physical fitness. People who have all the gear but can't run a mile are what we call "loot crates".

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          People who think they are going to raid are what we call "chained to a cement block and given water in exchange for manual tilling of future food plots after being run down by a dog and captured" or "dead from exposure after being chained to a cement block but being given only water and the insects they found while manual tilling of future food plots."

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That's the beauty of it. You don't have to kill the fatass to take his stuff, you just have to wait for him to die on his own.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Eh. I mean yeah you should absolutely have basic decent fitness, but we're talking real prep not LE SHTF FALLOUT meme'ing right? You generally just need to be prepared to shelter in place or drive off. If anything even in a more classic larp scenario I'd argue that social connections matter more. Good relations with neighbors and local community, friends, family, local organizations etc.
          >People who have all the gear but can't run a mile are what we call "loot crates".
          Unless they generously share all that gear with their group, in which case lone wolves who CAN run a mile but are asocial weirdos or criminals are called "outcasts" or "shoot on sight".

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            NTA but the biggest argument for fitness in the prepping sphere is that it's just fricking logical. Why would you take steps to protect yourself from rioters or nuclear war but not from heart disease and dementia?

            I agree with you that being able to bench 2plate or run a marathon probably isn't going to help you when you're sheltering in place or patrolling your neighborhood but it's for damn sure going to make more of a difference in your life overall.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I'm absolute not putting down basic physical fitness, or even getting really in shape. I love hiking, snow shoeing and kayaking, and the health benefits of not being a god damned fatass are well known. That said, come on:
              >Why would you take steps to protect yourself from rioters or nuclear war but not from heart disease and dementia?
              First floods/hurricanes/fires/earthquakes are much more applicable than the nuclear meme. And second those all affect someone instantly at any age, whereas even for somewhat unhealthy people the latter tend to not hit until 60s/70s/80s. A lot of people probably figure if they make it that far they had a decent life anyway. I don't think that's right myself, people forget about quality of life not just living longer. Being 80 but bed bound is a lot different then being 80 and still fully mobile and with a sharp mind, if forgetting more things.

              But it's also not any fricking mystery why 20-40yos would think more about natural disasters than health, right or wrong.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You're better off huddling down with all your supplies in a known location than abandoning your car in traffic and being stuck with only what you can carry alongside ten thousand people going the same direction with less of a plan than you. Also get more ammo.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pic is meant to sound moronic but it is true. "Whoa so minimal" is the selling point of a lot of IKEA crap, when you already have a perfectly serviceable milk crate.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      My table is just a giant wood cable spools. On one side I cut notches into it to rest my rifles upright in.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You're a fricking animal.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Those things work pretty well as tables if they don't wobble. No idea what they'd cost to actually buy 2nd hand but I imagine they aren't hard to find if you work in the right business.
          >t. used to work in a wire factory

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        comfy

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What's there to prep for? They won, we lost. Wars between sovereign nations have ended and civil unrest guided by enlightened principles no longer exists. People have shown they will have no problem whatsoever living in the pod as long as they have their bread and circuses.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How many people read this book before making fun of it?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just live next to a prepper. Befriend them. Stoke their paranoia and when shit hits the fan raid them.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Honestly if shtf just leave out a bunch of dog food, open the back door, then shoot your family& self

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You don't need a bug out bag but you do need a kill kit.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Black person seal wheat and sugar in mylar. For a few hundred bucks you don't have to worry about starving for months.

    https://providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org/food-storage?lang=eng

    gays not even trying

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >go bag
    Think of it more as an overnight bag. It should have a spare set of glasses, a couple days worth of any medication you take, a first aid kit (real one), a couple granola bars, bottle of water, dry socks and undies, rain poncho, lighter and parafin and maybe some rope. I also keep a solar battery charger in mine. I think of it more of a "get home" bag than a go bag. What if you end needing to walk 40 miles home for some reason? Seem unlikely? It is unlikely. It's also unlikely that you will hunker down for a few days of nuclear fall out. It's unlikely that there will ever be a need for such a bag but in the meanwhile, you have a spare set of glasses, the ability to make fire and first aid kit, as well as some dry socks.

    >Is there any point in prepping
    When I was a child, in Florida. They always said on the news and it was commonly accepted that every home should have a hurricane kit. Such a kit would include supplies for a couple of weeks such as flashlights, spare batteries, water and canned food. I look at "prepping" in the same regard. What if you need to stay home for the next several weeks without electricity or running water? Are you capable of bugging in?

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    these datamining threads never fail and I don't know why I am consistently surprised that people fall for it

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there a point in prepping
    no

  14. 1 month ago
    [PLEBSPOTTERS] BigC

    >trying to leave the city in a happening
    Where are you going?
    The small rural places will dome your ass if you try and show up

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I was thinking about getting a go bag
    Which is important. There is more to "bugging out" than just "The Habbening". What is a natural disaster happens? Power outage?

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The best weapon you can have in a shtf is a community of your racial cohorts that you know in advance. Does not mean you're wife swapping but people you know by first name, and you know what they are capable of. Get a few big coolers and fill them full of ice and beer and get some cheap burgers and dogs at Walmart cut up some toppings and throw a block party. Bring your own chair. Simple and cheap just focus on getting together. Get to know your neighbors. Talk to them, keep it light, but get a read. They will still be there as the sun sets. People are starving for community. Spark it. Then you find the solid dudes and then you have a crew. That's very hard to break. As for your gun, have gun parts and 1000 rounds of ammo. Cut into your beer money if you need to.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's a lot you can do to prep even if you live in the burbs. Just having a couple of months of food, some way to purify water, some basic supplies and a few simple home security improvements will let you cope with a fair number of disasters.

    When it comes to "prepping", it's important to remember that the simplest, cheapest, most basic preps are the ones you're most likely to use - and even in more serious emergencies where they're not enough on they're own, they'll still help. You're more likely to be in an emergency where you need 1 weeks food than an emergency where you need 2 weeks of food and, even if you, that first week you don't have to worry about gives you some breathing room.

    Obviously one of the big reasons people in the burbs or the city imagine themselves bugging out is security. Doesn't matter how much food you have squirreled away if someone can take it off you, potentially shooting yourself in the process.
    There's a fair amount you can do to make yourself a harder target, even in the suburbs and even if you're renting. Reinforcing your exterior doors so they can't be kicked opened in a single blow is the sort of thing you can DIY over a weekend.

    I'm of the opinion that bugging out should rarely be someone's first choice. There are exceptions - maybe you live on a flood plain or in a wildfire zone or your suburb is absolutely full Black folk.
    Even if you don't plan on bugging out though, it's still worth having a bug out bag prepared. Sometimes shit doesn't go to plan and it's not like having a small hiking pack filled with a change of clothes, a few Datrex bars and a backup of any important paperwork costs much.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    people who live in the suburbs are bunch of fence sitting homosexuals.
    they hate living in the city, but they love the money that working in the city provides.
    these chucklefricks need to commit one way or another, either live the city life or live the rural life.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So drive. You will have plenty of time. Prepping is only a way to buy TIME to make useful CHOICES. You need to have a place to go where you will fit in and be useful.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there a point prepping.
    99% of time that's a no.

    To "Prep" you really need a high risk threat, and something you can do to reduce its consequence in a reasonable manner, until outside support can be relied on.
    Throwing money and resources at a nebulous idea of danger might be your dig, but the vast odds are that zombie hordes are not going to eat through your country, and it'll go to waste.

    My family have an earthquake prep kit, which is a shipping container with food, water, blankets, fuel, and a generator. But mostly old gardening stuff as the risk likelihood is low.
    Otherwise we don't have much else beyond hiking kits, because I live in a town, in a region, that has very very few reasonable threats, and in the event of some calamity it's able to self-sustain communally, so there'd be no point building a Fallout Vault.

    Now if you live in an area with a clear high risk threat, which requires long term self-sufficiency, and there are reasonable practicable measures you can take to this, you absolutely have a reason to prep.
    Thing is, odds are that anyone who's capable of reading this post, is not living in such conditions.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there a point in prepping living in the burbs?
    For short term events, yes. Long term, you gtfo the burbs, because everything urban turns to hell in a long term event.

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