Is the Kukri the ultimate outdoors tool?

Knife, hatchet, weapon, to an extent even a spade or machete. Could it even be thrown?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Could it even be thrown?
    No you can't, that would create mustard gas

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No a McLeoud is.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Knife
    too big, unwieldy, and not nearly slicy enough to be a good one
    >hatchet
    a hatchet can split wood, a kukri cannot
    >weapon
    why would you use a tool as a weapon? first and foremost a kukri is just that - a tool
    a spear - that you can fashion with the tool - is an infinitely superior weapon
    >spade
    *ding* oops a rock *tip is gone and blade chipped*
    meme
    >machete
    a machete is long and nimble and relatively light
    a kukri is thick and heavy
    you will tire very quickly swinging it around all day clearing vines and bush

    Overall, a kukri is poor-mediocre at most tasks, but good at none. I'd much rather have a tool that can do 1 or 2 tasks properly than gimp myself with a subpar tool that tries to do everything.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >too big, unwieldy

      this is why kukri come with the two smaller knives, one is for detailed work, the other is blunt and used for sharpening

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Actually both of them are blunt and completely useless.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i can't use to gut and fillet a fish or field dress game, so what use is it to me?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >i can't use to gut and fillet a fish or field dress game
      I'm an avid hunter and I insist you need at least 2 different knives for these jobs anyway. I have a hollow ground 3.5" folder (Civivi Elementum 1st gen) for gutting deer/elk/moose and then I have a proper 7" filleting knife for filleting salmon and trout. With those two knives and my 1.8 lbs Stubai hatchet I can confidently perform every task requiring a cutting tool known to man. A cuckri can maybe chop some some thin limbs off a tree.

      Even as far as big blades go the kukri is inferior to other designs such as the Parang due to it's concave design. What this does is force you to strike at a certain sweet spot along the edge, yet this spot only rarely coincides with the sweet spot dictated by the point of balance. An aggressively convex design does not have this problem.

      Overall I'd say that kukris are hands down the worst outdoor tools I've ever used. Even the best ones were ultimately not keepers for me. If you must try them, at the very least just don't waste your money on the Nepalese ones unless it's strictly for decoration.

      The Parang is based. The British Army uses them on jungle exercises in Belize.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Even in the jungle a hatchet is still superior. It is simply the best chopping tool for it's overall weight and simultaneously gives you a highly effective and ergonomic hewing/carving tool to make anything you need to out of wood. A machete has no advantage for anything other than harvesting crops. The reason machetes are popular in South America and Africa is that they are widely proliferated due to most of the population being employed in agricultural work, and these people just don't have the cultural affinity for axes that northern people do. If I need any kind of chopping tool whatsoever I carry a hatchet. My big shiny Rambo larping knives went to the pawn shop years ago and I don't miss them. The biggest knife I own is my Cold Steel Drop Forged Survivalist, which is only 14 ounces and basically like an overbuilt kitchen knife with a guard, good for anything I might need a long edge for.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          One must also consider the types of wood they are primarily harvesting and chopping in South America and Oceania (I believe the Parang is from Indonesia): bamboo. You don't need a heavy splitting head and geometry for working bamboo, as opposed to Europe where the primary types of wood are dense hardwoods like beech and even soft woods are incredibly dense compared to the stuff they work with, which is ironic because tropical wood is actually some of the hardest wood on Earth, yet they don't seem to have figured out how to harvest it so it's reserved for desks and furniture in the Western world. The fact is you just don't need hatchets or axes for working bamboo and clearing rainforest paths.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You don't "need" them but they're still the best chopping tools for their weight and can actually fit completely inside of a backpack.

            As far as Asian blades go, I really don't give a shit what they do because I've owned a rather large number of expensive hand forged blades from reputable and popular smithing outfits in Asian countries and found the quality to be utterly appalling on average. They don't know what the frick they are doing, aside from the Japanese of course.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Like I said, the British Army uses the Parang in Belize. Clearly it does so because it works and for weight-related issues. Clearing brush or fashioning simple structures from bamboo doesn't require a hatchet whose head weighs as much as the entire tool. Do you think you know more about this subject than the British Army?

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              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yes, most likely.

                I imagine they used them because large blades are less likely to cause injury to the user than an axe of similar weight and function in the hands of inexperienced users. Axes can glance unpredictably with bad form, especially when the edge is not kept in good shape. I imagine that England has not produced competent axe users in many centuries.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You are clearly a delusional moron who conflates chopping wood with clearing brush, as if they weren't 2 completely different tasks.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                You clear brush by grabbing it and chopping it at the base with a hatchet.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Except that doesn't work in extremely dense rainforest brush where the base of undergrowth is wound around some trunk 30 metres in the air and grabbing strange, thorn-ridden, poison-secreting plants is a very, very bad idea.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                That looks like my backyard

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                There is nobody in the UK who knows more about cutting stuff than I do. The kind of practice that I was accustomed to on a daily basis as a child would get you arrested even if you somehow managed to find an area where there were any trees left. I really don't care what they think about these subjects anymore than I care what they think about shooting.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Serious problems with kukri knives.

    One is that they're all garbage. The authentic ones, even the famous Himalayan Imports, are the worst quality knives I have ever held. The forging is always warped, the grind is a joke and can't cut green pine, and the heat treatments are so bad you'll take a chip out of the edge the size of a guitar pick just doing basic limbing work. Half the time the blades don't even fit the sheaths they come with. These things were true with every Nepalese hand forged knife that I have ever seen. Next you have the American interpretations which, while much higher quality, completely misunderstand the design. The balance is completely wrong due to the tang designs and hand shock becomes an issue fast. Many of them are too light to get any serious work done. Most don't have a suitable grip geometry for chipping, they lack the characteristic pommel swell of a real kukri and have more of a combat knife grip that doesn't properly anchor the hand from the bottom, so it's not pivoting efficiently when swung. The better specimens are completely overpriced and usually made of the wrong steel for the job even if technically functional.

    Then there's the obvious fact that, with a blade this large and clumsy, you could get the same jobs done much easier with a hatchet of the same weight. There's no purpose to a knife form factor with this kind of weight unless you're harvesting shit tons of cane or something. You get less versatility, not more, because with a hatchet you can at least choke up on the handle for control. The kukri is useless for anything but chopping and splitting and rough hewing, but it's inferior to a hatchet for all of the above, and can never be as durable either.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Even as far as big blades go the kukri is inferior to other designs such as the Parang due to it's concave design. What this does is force you to strike at a certain sweet spot along the edge, yet this spot only rarely coincides with the sweet spot dictated by the point of balance. An aggressively convex design does not have this problem.

    Overall I'd say that kukris are hands down the worst outdoor tools I've ever used. Even the best ones were ultimately not keepers for me. If you must try them, at the very least just don't waste your money on the Nepalese ones unless it's strictly for decoration.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I prefer my bowie knife

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That looks like some kind of Walmart piece of shit

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm betting you're an expert on all things wallmart.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes. In fact the only pair of shoes I currently wear are from Walmart. They have lots of great stuff these days, much better quality than they did when I was a kid. Knives, not so much.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    ITT: autists who got their lunch money stolen by kukri chads as children

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The ultimate outdoors knife is obviously a puukko or a leuku with a scandi grind, thick spine, and relatively soft steel.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Scandi is the worst grind and far too specific/niche. Its only purpose is wood working. An outdoors knife should be a generalist. A 7" flat or saber grind is the best survival knife. Also, hardness isn't really a metric because it's highly HT specific. A properly treated 3V @ 60 HRC is much tougher than a poorly treated 1095 @ 57 HRC.
      The RAT 7 is in many regards the optimal survival/outdoors knife.

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