I'm tired of buying turd world crap (repackaged by western brands). How do I make my own clothes?

I'm tired of buying turd world crap (repackaged by western brands).
How do I make my own clothes? Are there any courses aimed at this?

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    turd world crap is sometimes better than domestically made crap
    cotton clothes made in Pakistan, for example

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      steer clear of egyptian cotton while you're at it. you deserve god tier polyester.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >How do I make my own clothes?
    it doesn't matter, you won't do it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This, you cannot make the process any more cheaper.
      It is literally one of the first supply chains that got seriously automatized in the entire history of our economy retard.
      The very first real lathe was made to create parts for making clothes. Even just learning the principles for designing ergonomic, usable clothes will require so much of your input, that unless you are really passionate about fashion you will not do.
      And contrary to mass produced clothes from Bangladesh it will probably look like shit.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What a nagger brain take.

        He didn’t say anything about making it cheaply, or the cost being too high. He just wanted to make himself. You can make a t-shirt pretty easily yourself, pants etc. it’s all just free stencils you can download.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Have you considered just buying better brands? There is plenty of good clothes out there if you're looking to escape fast fashion. That said, pick up a book on sewing and basic stitches, then find some patterns for clothes you want.

          If money isn't a factor then it's easy to find quality clothing.

          There are Western people who make clothes to the customer's specifications, and they're going to be better at it than you are. My friend is one; she's a bit self-absorbed now (she didn't want to make me a hoodie because she prefers making wedding dresses for flamboyantly gay men) but her clothes will dab on yours and look much better. If you just want to make your own clothes, you might as well start out learning to sew sleeves onto a burlap sack because that's what the clothes will look like.

          Also this. I'm guessing OP can't afford bespoke or he wouldn't want to do it himself, but MT sites can be a reasonably priced alternative.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >PrepHole

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              I was responding to OP saying he was tired of buying crap. refuting a statement isn't the same as saying you shouldn't diy something. Kys, retard.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe he just doesn't want to give his money to shekelstein. Did your small brain ever consider that ?

            Just say something helpful or fuck off.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >twisting words to make a point
              Whatever, dipshit

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        pick a pattern template, pick a fabric.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Unironically check Joanns Fabric in your area for learn to sew classes. Or your community center / community college.
        Unless you tell us where you live, we cannot be more specific.

        >It is literally one of the first supply chains that got seriously automatized
        He's right, automated mills literally drove the industrial revolution, closing out the literal cottage industry of fabric production. It was a global revolution.

        It's stupid simple
        Get something you own
        Take it apart
        Make cardboard versions of the individual parts
        Cut new material in those shapes.
        Use a sowing machine to put it back together.

        >It's stupid simple
        I like the cut of your jib. I work entirely from self made patterns, or sew by drape and tailor.

        Maybe not cardboard. There's swedish sewing paper on Amazon that can be used even in mock-ups, has a similar feel and workability to cloth. Or the long brown rolls of postage paper, those also work. They're more sturdy than pattern tissue, but still paper and can tear easily though.

        Or, you know, use muslin, like everyone normally does, at $1/yd and available anywhere fabric is sold.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          textile production is not garment manufacture

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Gee, it's almost like a 100X reduction in the cost of fabric and the invention of sewing machine (itself part of the industrial revolution) would have a knock on impact to the cost of garments, and this reduction would have pre-dated other industrial items like the automobile. since everyone wears clothing.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This, you cannot make the process any more cheaper.
      It is literally one of the first supply chains that got seriously automatized in the entire history of our economy retard.
      The very first real lathe was made to create parts for making clothes. Even just learning the principles for designing ergonomic, usable clothes will require so much of your input, that unless you are really passionate about fashion you will not do.
      And contrary to mass produced clothes from Bangladesh it will probably look like shit.

      >any more cheaper
      What the fuck, where in op’s post did they mention making it cheaper? They don’t want to buy cheap dogshit you fucking demoralizing homosexuals.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes there are courses for this. Look at sewing stores, community colleges, buy a course online, buy books and watch videos and teach yourself. Lots of options. Get a mid-grade sewing machine, a good quality iron and ironing board, muslin, good scissors, pins, tape measure, thread, and basic "easy" sewing patterns and practice. The first three years you'll make stuff that's worse than the 3rd world stuff you buy in stores. The next 2 years will be 3rd world quality but cost 10 times as much in time and fabric. After about 5 years you should, with consistant practice and learning, be good enough to make decent pieces that fit, look pretty good, and cost 3x what storebought does in time and fabric. After that, learn how to tailor. It's fun.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not OP, do you have any resources you can link to or recommend?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Women are so nice. No wonder we tolerate a lot of crap from them or that we do inconceivable things just to get them in our grasp.
    It doesn't take much either to provoke us, maybe she was just in that position and wearing those clothes because it was comfortable, but just looking at her like that makes me rock hard and ready to pump her full of seed while laying over those funny concoctions.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There are Western people who make clothes to the customer's specifications, and they're going to be better at it than you are. My friend is one; she's a bit self-absorbed now (she didn't want to make me a hoodie because she prefers making wedding dresses for flamboyantly gay men) but her clothes will dab on yours and look much better. If you just want to make your own clothes, you might as well start out learning to sew sleeves onto a burlap sack because that's what the clothes will look like.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It depends. How serious are you about taking this on? If you're male, unless you're fat or work out your proportions will be easy enough to sew standard from a pattern. If you're female, most patterns are made for a B cup and will require alterations to fit correctly. There's a lot of terminology that you need to learn, information about how different types of fabrics (how they hang, stiffness, durability, washability, how they behave while sewing), what kind of machine you want, the needles and feet needed, other sewing notions, and the techniques needed to prepare and sew the clothing you want.
    The fabric is still mostly made outside of the US, and a lot of it that's available from the chain craft stores is low quality dog shit. Every fucking time that I've gotten fabric from Hobby Lobby, it gets holes during the prewash despite care taken in prep. Avoid Hobby Lobby, except for interfacing, some notions, or shit you want to practice with that you plan to toss. Fabric is expensive, regardless of the quality. There are plenty of tutorials on youtube. I used Tock Custom to help on the collar for a shirt, and he explained everything pretty well. It looks like he has videos on threading the machine, maintenance, and various techniques that would probably be helpful for a beginner.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I'm tired of buying turd world crap
    If you make your own clothes they will end up looking retarded and even worse than a $1.99 t-shirt from temu

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Who is this?
    She looks exactly like my friend. I hope it's porn.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not porn. Crafting youtuber that does a lot of yarnwork and sewing.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you can do it OP. I went out to REI and looked at sandals and about shit my pants so i went out and bought leather and supplies and made my own. 2 pairs done and a third in the works, all for less than one pair of birkenstocks.. it's not about being able to do it cheaper, it's really about being able to do it for yourself and to your own satisfaction. No one else can do that. Good luck. Probably lessons at a local community college or something, but almost certainly lessons on youtube for whatever you want to make. Im about at wits end when it comes to pants as well.. very hard to get a pair that fits and sits like it should. I hear the dickies 874 is a good cut but now it's 65% polyester. fuck this gay earth

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Based. Fuck the rest of the do-nothing demoralizers on this board

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thrift stores. Salvation Army, for a chain. Not Goodwill.
      Or local thrift.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        hey that's cool advice but i'm just gonna make my own!

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          pants?

          That's what i meant. All your blah blah blah about sandals was top tier. Here, it's like a couple bucks a bag for clothes from the local thrift. Pants are idk $1 ea. Sandals - yes that's kino; you need god tier footwear for god tier feet. God bless you anon and all your descendants.

          I had forgotten this is a sewing diy thread. I guess when I saw Dickies I thought 'heavy work pant'. And polyester is a no no. That's how you get inner thigh burn from normal sweat and walking around for a day. When I think 'work pant' it's just jeans or something comfy that's going to get paint, torn, stain, etc on it. Therefore thrift.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >pants?

            anything? OP came here asking to learn how to sew and make clothes and i encouraged them. You then responded to my comment with "go to thrift stores"..

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    is there a source?
    t. testing my NFN

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's stupid simple
    Get something you own
    Take it apart
    Make cardboard versions of the individual parts
    Cut new material in those shapes.
    Use a sowing machine to put it back together.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not that simple though. You have to know construction order, various specific techniques and processes (like inserting various zipper types, easing a shoulder, setting a placket, etc), how much to restore graded seam allowances, etc.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Anon. You're overcomplicating it. If he's not fat or muscular, it'll be no big. Most of the instructions for construction come with the paper pattern. He just needs trial and error, and some youtube instruction. Yeah, you end up making some mistakes along the way and fuck up. That's expected, and it's a learning experience. The amount of times that I've dicked up and sewn through a layer (or around it) because I sewed while tired is plenty. He'll learn his way around the seam ripper like we all have.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >You're overcomplicating it
          Lmfao! Post some loving-hands-at-home couture garment you've sewn.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >couture
            It's not top fashion. It's not perfect by any standards. It's made to the measurements that I want in the patterns and type of fabric that I want. If OP wants to make something on his own, there's no reason to discourage that.
            This was taken after it was worn, so it's wrinkled and the sleeves were rolled up.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Well, it certainly fits your how to learning criteria. Keep practicing

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Looks pretty decent for it being the first time learning a technique for both the collar and button placket. The point is to learn and make shit along the way. If you want something perfect, pay for it.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                hey just wanna let you know, i don't know you but you sound like a douche bag!

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, I can see that. As someone who taught sewing for 15+ years, I dislike the online "advice" from amateur sewists to just watch youtube and just tear something apart and trace it and resew it, etc. Beginners don't know what they don't know, and then they teach others bad half-assed techniques and bad habits. Just leads to bad fit, bad sewing, bad garments, and more bad "teachers." So yeah, keep practicing.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That was a separate anon, but yes. The goal is to keep practicing. My original suggestion to OP was

                It depends. How serious are you about taking this on? If you're male, unless you're fat or work out your proportions will be easy enough to sew standard from a pattern. If you're female, most patterns are made for a B cup and will require alterations to fit correctly. There's a lot of terminology that you need to learn, information about how different types of fabrics (how they hang, stiffness, durability, washability, how they behave while sewing), what kind of machine you want, the needles and feet needed, other sewing notions, and the techniques needed to prepare and sew the clothing you want.
                The fabric is still mostly made outside of the US, and a lot of it that's available from the chain craft stores is low quality dog shit. Every fucking time that I've gotten fabric from Hobby Lobby, it gets holes during the prewash despite care taken in prep. Avoid Hobby Lobby, except for interfacing, some notions, or shit you want to practice with that you plan to toss. Fabric is expensive, regardless of the quality. There are plenty of tutorials on youtube. I used Tock Custom to help on the collar for a shirt, and he explained everything pretty well. It looks like he has videos on threading the machine, maintenance, and various techniques that would probably be helpful for a beginner.

                , and there have been plenty of others' suggestions to utilize in-person courses. Youtube still has a whirlwind of tutorial material and explanations that will help if he's not willing to go to those. I understand being peeved about some of the suggestions from your perspective, but sometimes people have to approach new things differently than traditional methods and see some sort of fruit (even if it looks like battered ass) to be encouraged enough to keep going.
                Anyway, while I have you here, can you suggest fusible interfacing for light weight wovens that isn't terrible? I've considered just going with sew-ins from the frustration with Pellon, but I'm afraid of bulk.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Pellon interfacings always have to be pre-shrunk, and even then they aren't great. I prefer the pre-shrunk Pro series from Fashion Sewing Supply.
                https://www.fashionsewingsupply.com/products_new.php?osCsid=85131e2036f7d5cb54198a14d6c090fb
                They're a little pricey but come in wider widths and are top quality.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I didn't know that fusible was supposed to be washed first. I thought that even on cold it would affect the glue spheres, or at minimum change the texture of the base material of the interfacing and make it fuzz up. I think the problem in the waistband of the skirt that I made was in part to using an interfacing that was too thick, but you can see there's this almost papery effect that looks terrible. I notice with other pre-washed fabrics (and more appropriate weighted interfacing) that it just doesn't want to bind very well even with damp press cloth and/or steam (polyblends and 100% cotton). I've seen Fashion Sewing Supply brought up a few times on sewingpatternreview though, so what you're saying solidifies it for me to switch. Thanks for the suggestion.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Not washed but preshrunk. Fold loosely and submerge in hot-ish water. Let the water cool to room temp, drain, roll in towels to remove excess and let dry. It's not terribly effective imo.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Whew. Here I was waiting for Mood's sales to get fabrics at around that per yard. It is 60' for most of these, so that's at least something. Her shipping cost is pretty decent.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I think it's worth the investment. You can get a lot of collars and cuffs and plackets out of a single yard.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I think I'll try to pick up a yard of a couple of different weights initially to build up a small starter stash on it. First will be an attempt to preshrink what I've got now so that I can use that up.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                could you post some of the stuff you've made that you're really proud of, or that you wear regularly?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Favorite thing is an unlined jacket out of a narrow piece of handwoven fabric my godmother bought in Peru on her travels. I didn't have enough to match the patch pockets to the body but it doesn't stand out.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                https://i.imgur.com/60Rhhfe.jpg

                Other stuff I wear on the regular : long front wrap skirt in a woven ikat, floral denim wrap skirt copied from a rtw skirt, silk lined red corduroy vest, the jacket from before, plaid seersucker shirt, denim shirt. That's a small fraction of stuff. Most of it desperately needs ironing so excuse the wrinkles.

                https://i.imgur.com/yERDGQM.jpg

                Shirt I made for my brother out of a 50s vintage fabric. It was 22" wide and maybe 45" long? Matched it with a similar weight muslin. Had just enough fabric to match the pattern on the pockets. French seams through put and double-layer yoke.

                wow.. well.. really goes to show that.. i dunno i guess beauty and quality is in the eye of the beholder? good on you though for being confident in yourself!

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                See, your ultra obvious and predictable attempt at a "Gotcha!" really has no affect on me. The set up was kind of elementary school level. Just keep practicing. You'll get there someday if you don't rage quit.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                yea the stitches look great.. where you can see them through those lovely patterns!! lmao i guess toxoplasmosis makes shit like that look good though

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Thank you! I appreciate your kind words!

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The quality looks pretty indistinguishable from something that you could pick up in a store, seems solid from the pictures at least. The denim shirt shows stitchwork more easily than the other ones do though.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                As with a lot of denim pieces the construction work is done with a matching thread and the topstitching is in a contrasting thread--white here instead of the typical gold. The blotchy repair mending on the sleeve is where i spilled battery acid while working on my truck.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I had to zoom in on that. I initially thought it was an altered form of sashiko until getting a closer look. It kind of works for it though. If that were on both sleeves, I would have just thought it was intentional on design.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous
              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                lmao not bait i honestly thought someone who had "taught sewing for 15 years" and was on here doling out advice would have decent pictures of garments(where you can actually see the stitches and the shape, not blurry and thrown on the bed with obscuring patterns) and that they would actually look significantly better than the garments of the person they were criticizing(not mine).. But they weren't even really any better.. maybe the stitches were a little straighter? and the stylistic sense was again well lmao i would rather wear a toga made of a nice donegal wool but hey to each their own

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                See I could go iron everything, set up my mannequin, backgrounds and studio lights, style and photogragh everything, including close ups of detail work, top stitching, bound buttonholes, covered buttons, french seams, pockets and plackets that actually match across the shirt front, linings, bias bound waistbands, hongkong finishes, welt pockets, yadda yadda yadda. But I don't really care what you think about my work, boy-o. The childish attempt at a gotcha tells me everything I need to know. Keep practicing.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >See I could go iron everything, set up my mannequin, backgrounds and studio lights, style and photogragh everything, including close ups of detail work, top stitching, bound buttonholes, covered buttons, french seams, pockets and plackets that actually match across the shirt front, linings, bias bound waistbands, hongkong finishes, welt pockets, yadda yadda yadda.

                but it would still look like it was made out of recycled curtains from a second hand store and cut to fit over a couch lmaooooo sorry this is too fun

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Show us your pussy.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous
              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Other stuff I wear on the regular : long front wrap skirt in a woven ikat, floral denim wrap skirt copied from a rtw skirt, silk lined red corduroy vest, the jacket from before, plaid seersucker shirt, denim shirt. That's a small fraction of stuff. Most of it desperately needs ironing so excuse the wrinkles.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Do you need a twin needle machine to make those double stitches

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                No. You can just do two passes with a single needle. Most regular sewing machines that can do a zigzag stitch and have a second spool pin can use a twin needle though.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                i'm worried about distance between the stitches not being uniform

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It helps if you have a 1/4" piecing foot. Edge stitch the first pass (arrow, brown thread). Use that line of thread to align the 2nd pass. See pics below

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                With the 1/4" foot, the distance between the needle and the right edge of the foot is 1/4". Line the right edge of the foot up with the first line of stitching. Watch that edge, and not the needle as you sew the 2nd pass.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The second pass (green thread) will be 1/4" from the first (brown thread) as long as the right side is aligned with the first pass. Takes a little practice to keep it straight. The trick is to watch that the foot edge placement lines up with the edge stitching and not watch the needle

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Quads! Lol! If you need a narrower double line, and your machine has the option of varying the needle position, move the needle to the right more with a zigzag foot. If you can't move your needle, you can use a small strip of painters tape on the foot to mark where to align the edgestitching row for the 2nd pass.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >just align
                it's not so simple going through weird curves

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                At no point did I say "just align". I did say it takes practice. Curved areas will always require that you slow down some and pay attention to the edgestitching and where the fabric pivot point is as you navigate the curves like on pockets, collars, cuffs, or zipper openings. It takes practice to get comfortable with the process. A twin needle eliminates the need for two passes but still requires attention to alignment and pivot points.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Shirt I made for my brother out of a 50s vintage fabric. It was 22" wide and maybe 45" long? Matched it with a similar weight muslin. Had just enough fabric to match the pattern on the pockets. French seams through put and double-layer yoke.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              ignore the arsehole, you are the spirit of true diy. and your resulting shirt looks better made than most things i see in the shops.
              keep up the good work!

              https://i.imgur.com/SFItoDy.jpg

              I'm tired of buying turd world crap (repackaged by western brands).
              How do I make my own clothes? Are there any courses aimed at this?

              two things: patterns and toiles. a toile is like a mock-up prototype made from cheap fabric, you can make your pattern, then make a toile from it, then edit the pattern and make a new toile untill it fits perfectly, before wasting good fabric.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              what would happen to the shirt collar if it didn't have the raised section over which the lapel folds? seen a few shirt jacket designed that way wondering if i'm missing something

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                So like a camp collar instead of a traditional collar with a collar stand?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                What

                So like a camp collar instead of a traditional collar with a collar stand?

                said.
                https://tianascloset.com/index.php/2023/06/18/how-to-sew-collar-without-collar-stand-flat-collar/
                She's got a video that shows you what it looks like.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe not cardboard. There's swedish sewing paper on Amazon that can be used even in mock-ups, has a similar feel and workability to cloth. Or the long brown rolls of postage paper, those also work. They're more sturdy than pattern tissue, but still paper and can tear easily though.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I prefer oaktag. I buy big rolls on amazon

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what a delicious body. she better be flat chested

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >buy cotton by the yard
    >learn how to wrap a toga
    >be more comfy than 99% of people

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you weren’t such an idiot you would’ve already watched dozens of incredibly informative videos uploaded to youtube by women. It’s incredible how stubborn and pathetic some of you people are. Maybe you don’t deserve to learn new skills.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I would DIY her if you know what i mean

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ignore the retards in the thread OP.

    Buying yourself a used sawing machine is the first step. Try to find a better model from a good brand and not some chin-ease shit. An older machine might need servicing, so count that into your budget.

    Second step is finding a pattern. There's a billion of them for free online, or you could go the old way and buy a pattern book/booklet. I suggest begging with something basic, like a regular t-shirt, to get the hang of it. If you're having trouble reading the pattern, just google/youtube your question like we all do for everything nowadays.

    Last step is buying some fabric. There should be a fabric store somewhere in your nearest city. I'd suggest actually going there in person so you can feel the fabrics instead of ordering online, but the latter could of course save you some dollars. It's going to be though finding fabrics made locally, or even from western countries, but it's still better than buying cheap (and sometimes not so cheap) shit clothes from the same places. You could also score some unused fabric second hand if you're lucky. Fabric is almost exclusively sold by the meter, so look on your pattern what the expected meterage is and buy a bit more just in case.

    It's not hard sawing your own clothes, but it's difficult to make them look nice. Skill comes with practice, though there's a lot of different sawing techniques that require different equipment/machines. Start small to learn the basics, then step up when you need to.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Another thing you could try is knitting. Yarn is easier to find locally produced, and there's several brands that produce high quality yarns. Look for at least 50% wool. Wool keeps you warm in winter and cool in summer. There's different weights of yarn (size of thread) that gives different results for different use cases. Best way is to find/buy a pattern you like from a manufacturer, who's yarn you then buy. This takes out the guess work. Start with something basic, like a hat or a scarf.

      Knitting is incredibly relaxing and at least I tend to think that a knitted cardigan is way, way nicer than anything you can buy. Especially since you can do any pattern you'd like (when skilled enough). Following a knit pattern is like building Lego's when you've learned the basics.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/dQWX7aa.jpg

      Another thing you could try is knitting. Yarn is easier to find locally produced, and there's several brands that produce high quality yarns. Look for at least 50% wool. Wool keeps you warm in winter and cool in summer. There's different weights of yarn (size of thread) that gives different results for different use cases. Best way is to find/buy a pattern you like from a manufacturer, who's yarn you then buy. This takes out the guess work. Start with something basic, like a hat or a scarf.

      Knitting is incredibly relaxing and at least I tend to think that a knitted cardigan is way, way nicer than anything you can buy. Especially since you can do any pattern you'd like (when skilled enough). Following a knit pattern is like building Lego's when you've learned the basics.

      Sorry for shit english btw
      >t. fin

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A tshirt is a baaaad first time project for a beginner. Knits are stretchy, there are several extra-stretchy bias cut areas (necklines, armscyes), applying ribbed knit without a serger is a pain, hemming without a serger or twin neefles or a coverstitch machine takes practice, and measuring for negative ease is counter-intuitive for many. Get an "easy" elastic waist pajama pants pattern to start, and cotton woven or cotton flannel to work with. I say this as someone who taught sewing for years.

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any pics of her feet?

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Buy a sowing machine, buy fabric, cut fabric, and sow. I suggest you watch YouTube views on sowing clothes to see if your actually going to do it

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    who is this qt? are those cute arm tattoos diy too?

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on what you call "making your own clothes". Sewing pants from a pattern out of cotton you imported by the yard from Pakistan? Pretty fucking easy once you learn a few basic techniques, I did it in middle school just to learn how to do it. Making tube spun shirts yourself from raw cotton? Lol, have fun.

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