im replacing an outlet.

im replacing an outlet. All the tutorial videos told me to cut off the old copper tip and strip a new one What happening if I don't strip the wire and just start screwing in the wire? I can't find an answer online

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That's what I do.

    t. licensed electrican

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      lazy shitbag. terrible electrican

      The old exposed copper could be oxidized and therefore not provide a good connection to the outlet. A high resistance connection means more heat in the connection if you draw a lot of amps from the outlet.

      It's a one in a million chance it'll happen, but it's still good practice to make sure your connections are clean. A fiberglass pen will clean up and shine copper if you don't want to or can't cut off to fresh wire.

      >one in a million chance
      thanks, guess i wont strip it

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Usually any oxidation will be wiped away by the screw head as you're tightening it down. Make sure the screws are nice and snug.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What state are you licensed by? Is it a good career?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The old exposed copper could be oxidized and therefore not provide a good connection to the outlet. A high resistance connection means more heat in the connection if you draw a lot of amps from the outlet.

    It's a one in a million chance it'll happen, but it's still good practice to make sure your connections are clean. A fiberglass pen will clean up and shine copper if you don't want to or can't cut off to fresh wire.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You can tell when oxidization occurs.
      OP just clean the wire before you attach it to the new outlet

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can, but a newbie like OP might not recognize that a dark wire means it's oxidized. Bright copper is realistically what you want for a good connection, but in reality it doesn't really matter as long as the wire isn't literally bluegreen.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The old exposed copper could be oxidized and therefore not provide a good connection to the outlet.
      The advantage of copper over aluminum is that the copper oxides continue to have the almost the same electrical conductivity as bare copper.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >fiberglass pen
      neat.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If it has holes at back just plug in the wires. Simple as.

    Screwing the wires in is a boomer meme.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you're not soldering wires to the outlet you're just asking for a house fire

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >cut off the old copper tip and strip a new one
    Future owners will hate your fucking guts for shortening the wires to the point of un-usability.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      not my problem

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Depends on how long you live there.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Exactly. The annual junction box cleaning and outlet reassembly really takes it's toll.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      wire nut another piece of wire to make it longer

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Future owners will hate your fucking guts for shortening the wires to the point of un-usability.

      Future owners won't give a fuck but the electricians they hire will

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sparky don't mind running a new circuit. Got bills to pay.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just take a utility knife and scrape the existing wire ffs

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unless it is oxidized (which you can visibly detrmine, it will be green), nothing wil happen.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hit it with a Scotch Brite.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    copper can work harden and break when you screw it under the terminal, and an untrained person (you) wont be able to tell, which may cause issues immediately or in the future.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Electricians know that in any electrical branch (or other) circuit, terminations are always the greatest points of liability in terms of resistance heating. Meaning those old stripped wire ends have likely taken disproportionate heating wear and tear over time. It's usually nothing to remove them and strip back for a renewed termination.

    Also, absolutely avoid insert or push-connect type (receptacle) terminations wherever possible.

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