If you had a grenade made of ice shrapnel would the ice melt or would it still hit stuff solid like when it at explore to like be in to you?

If you had a grenade made of ice shrapnel would the ice melt or would it still hit stuff solid like when it at explore to like be in to you?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What if you froze cyanide into the ice?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I can't fully understand what you're saying but ice takes a lot of heat energy to melt even at 0C.
    I'm too lazy to do the calcs if someone feels like it go ahead.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      OP is rehashing the old ice bullet BS but as a grenade instead of a bullet.

      TLDR, make a bullet out of ice and shoot someone. By the time they check the body the bullet has melted and there's no evidence. Mythbusters tested it years ago. The bullet doesn't even make it out the barrel before its vapor. A grenade would probably be the same.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Mythbusters tested it years ago. The bullet doesn't even make it out the barrel before its vapor
        I wonder what kind of fancy peltier/nitrogen based sabot you could make it to keep it intact until it leaves the barrel?
        Instead of trying to make the whole bullet vanish, use it to deliver a different, smaller bullet to make them look for a pistol shooter instead of a sniper.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    just incoherent enough for me to understand what you mean
    there isnt a lot of time for the heat to transfer maybe it would melt under the pressure?
    what are you trying to do anon?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I can't fully understand what you're saying but ice takes a lot of heat energy to melt even at 0C.
      I'm too lazy to do the calcs if someone feels like it go ahead.

      I think he's asking if the heat produced by a grenade filled with ice exploding would cause the ice inside to melt before it could fragment and be propelled at lethal velocity.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If the exterior shell is made of ice, no, there's not enough time to melt it, inside it maybe some will melt due to pressure and heat.
        Imagine hitting a block of ice really hard with a red hot hammer, some would melt but more likely it would shatter first.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think you could get a big enough piece of ice going fast enough to do anything useful without it being blown apart

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ice grenades freezes people moron

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ice has a pretty low density compared to metal or rocks, which is why ice fragments would slow down quicker.
    it might also pulverize instead of shattering into large fragments. it's probably not pleasant to be hit by snow moving at the speed of sound, but it's probably not reliably incapacitating either.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >it might also pulverize instead of shattering into large fragments. it's probably not pleasant to be hit by snow moving at the speed of sound, but it's probably not reliably incapacitating either
      That's what I think too, ice shatters, fractures and splits far too easily so I think you'd end up with technically frozen ice fragments which split into smaller and smaller chunks until it's more or less harmless. At that point, while it's technically a solid, it's a powder of fine ice dust and not going to carry force into a target. Then a moment later it's going to be an aerosolised liquid and condense/fall out of the air.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you think there's a time limit to how fast something can change from a solid to liquid or vice versa? There is none, it can happen in an instant. Given the heat and energy I'd wager it would splash water all over the place.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Given the heat and energy I'd wager it would splash water all over the place.
      I'd love to see you try to do the math on that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Anon the time limit in this scenario would of course be the time it takes the pressure wave to hurl the ice away.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on the temperature I’d guess. If you had ice at -100C it probably wouldnt melt, but if you had it at like -10C you’d probably get a fine mist. Either way as the other anons said ice sucks dick and would get pulverized so at best youd get micro needles who’d get repelles by skin and clothing.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Would not work very well due to the low density, and likely vaporization of the ice. Similar drawbacks to a wooden grenade.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    assuming its made in a way similar to modern grenades, i.e., same ratio of materials, only supplemented
    most of the ice would be straight up evaporated out of a mix of the ice being shattered into a snow-like consistency, and then the hot gasses both melting the particles & the particles traveling through the air, creating a cloud of steam that is superseded by the explosion itself

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >does getting hit with a snowball hurt as much as getting hit with a metal ball or rock?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The ice would vaporize
    So no

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It might pulverize and sublimate due to the high pressure rather than from the heat itself.

    A few chunks might fly around with enough force to hurt but ice has low mass so it might be particularly ineffective.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sex with Futaba

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Nah, ice kinda powders itself when encountering explosives. That combined with the low density would probably make the explosion itself more dangerous than the fragments.

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