I need your help?

Hello fellow basket weaving enthusiasts,

Recently bought a home. Inspector said fill this gap with hydraulic cement. Looked it up and hydraulic cement only last about two years.

This gap is where the old foundation meets the new foundation.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Should I just fill this with normal quikrete? Pls respond

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Weird.
    Anyway, you need do dig doe and get it all the way to the bottom.
    Acid etch and prime both sides.
    When pouring, make sure the old concrete is damp.
    Drill some holes and add rebar/zinc bolts through to the inside, with some heavy steel galvanized mesh that is tied to the bolts/rebar
    Anchor them with structural epoxy (or grout)
    Build a mould around the area to something that looks good, and pour.
    Don’t let it dry out, cover with a tarp and keep it slightly damp for 28 days.
    You can even colour the cement or use a rock impression on the inside of the mould.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      this sounds great but sounds really fricking intense and my skills are very limited

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You don’t need to do it all, but the more you do, the longer it will last.
        Pinning it to the old foundation is pretty important—not doing that is why it opened up. May be still moving but it looks old, so likely less so.
        Normally—before we pour the new foundation—we drill holes and put in a bunch of rebar stubs for the tie-in.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          … cont.
          Looking at your pic, you’d drill from the outside of the new thing sticking through into the cinderblock.
          I hope to hell they filled the cinderblock with concrete.
          Anyway you get some grout or epoxy in old foundations cinderblock holes and shove the rod (bolt or rebar) through both.
          You can try and grout the holes in the new, or use the bolt holes, or get these special bolts to go on the end of rebar. No not reef on these or they will crack or pull out.
          The idea of the mold was to straighten that thing out and hide the bolt ends sticking out.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            … cont
            Oh, and for a joint that size, you’re probably looking at about 6 holes with rebar stubs (or bolts).

            It’s not as hard as it sounds, believe me.

            If there is still a gap inside where it gets narrower and the cement didn’t flow, you might want to use floor leveller with no aggregate to seep in there for a good seal, if you can get to the top of it to pour it in. I use it to fill irregular cracks and support concrete where the underside has caved in in —
            you can get a lot of it through a small hole.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Ah man anon this is extremely helpful. It's possible that I could drill through and use allthread like the other post suggested I just have no idea where the other side of this is. I went into the crawlspace where I thought it would be and couldn't make out anything distinct or helpful.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, allthread works fine if you want to go right through, although the zinc coating isn’t 25-year like it is on hot dip galvanized things.
            Get like at least 1/2” but 5/8 or 3/4 is better still.

            Like i said, normally we use rebar and don’t go all the way through, but that’s an ideal and every situation is different.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              … i don’t know what this moron is doing, but see how long the nozzle is on the structural epoxy?
              So if you drill from the outside all the way into half-way through the old foundation, you should be able to get that nozzle in to the old cinderblock part of the hole, then shocve the rebar through both into the epoxy, let that cure, then that’s your tie in to the old foundation

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Ahh ok so only drill halfway into the new one ok it's definitely coming together in my head now.

                How long do you plan on staying in this house before moving

                >All this work
                This is the correct way to do it, but I would put ply on each side and fill with a normal bag of cement and be done with it.

                At the very least 10 years, hopefully a long ass time.
                But yeah that's originally what I was thinking of doing but I think I can do a kind of best of both worlds and do a little tying together and then pour concrete in all on top of that.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'm honestly down to try and drill it and put some allthread in and really try to make it last as long as possible. But ok I think I will drill through and I will also take your advice about using floor leveller for a really good seal.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      but I truly appreciate the detailed response anon

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How long do you plan on staying in this house before moving

      >All this work
      This is the correct way to do it, but I would put ply on each side and fill with a normal bag of cement and be done with it.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Have you dug down to get to the bottom yet? Pls update with photo.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How long of an area do the two overlap?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The gap only extends maybe about 9 inches down toward the deck and then it appears to normalize and basically reconnect.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Well shit. Yeah i would probably drill and pin some rebar or allthread with nuts and washers inside and out just slightly more than finger tight, form up the side and pour from the top if you can with regular concrete or if you cant get in from the top make a cement rich drypack and ram it in there from the side with a broom handle or board to pack it in nice and tight and then trowel it off smooth at the edge.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You guys are based and I appreciate all of you.

          The problem is, I don't know where the other side of this thing is, like I can't access this from the basement so I can't really drill through both sides

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    3 tubes of caulkll get r done
    t. Trim Carpenter

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mix sacrette at a 2 - 3 slump slap it in and trowel it smooth.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is basically what I was thinking. You think I should use a mortar bag and just like inject a bunch deep in there?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Frick all that, its not going anywhere
    Fill it with 3 bags of sacrette call er good

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    honestly anons I feel so much better about this shit after making this thread, it was honestly freaking me tf out.

    I truly appreciate each and everyone one of you space cowboys. I'm going to go to the store and I'll try to update you guys with a new thread later in the week. I have no time for anything serious today

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >This gap is where the old foundation meets the new foundation.
    that's obviously not what it is at all...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm just going off whatcthe inspector said in his report. But please let me know if you can tell me more. The house is really old like there is this old has root cellar type room in rhe basement made of brick like even the floor is brick it's like there is a new Cinderblock basement but there is the old crawlspace and the old like cellar part too.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        nobody can tell from your shit photo. it looks like some Black person just leaned a piece of driveway against the wall

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          This is from before but I'll take more tomorrow

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'm going to go out on a limb here and say those concrete slabs were prepoured leftovers from somewhere used to enclose the underside of a raised building. The metal parts look to me like bearer brackets for nogs between bearers. Is the front of the house to the right in this picture? Get a torch and see what you can see through that gap. I'm going to guess there'll be nothing there. I see a concut saw and a few stout fellas with shovels and crowbars in your future if so.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              This is actually the back of the house but yeah basically nothing is behind there. I took this picture yesterday as well and I can see some super old bricks and what looks like wood maybe. I went into the crawlspace two days ago and then again yesterday just because I wanted to see if I could get any additional information but it was really hard to discern anything down there.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                i dunno wtf is going on here but the sill plate is probably fricked. your inspector is moronic and not worth whatever you paid him. what do you hope to achieve by filling this crack? it will do frick all except maybe keep out animals. someone needs to jack up the house and replace all this bullshit.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Also, nice digits

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Don't move that rock, breh.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >This gap is where the old foundation meets the new foundation.
    Bro that's a facade piece, not even the spiccest contractors are gonna lay a foundation wall that thin.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I don't know what I'm doing but let me ignore what the guy that does know says and make this an enormous thing for no reason because I google told me sponsor-biased shit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I literally have no idea what I'm doing, in his report it said hydraulic cement MAY be the solution. And he explained to me a little bit about it and emphasized the importance of wearing gloves. I was wondering if what he suggested is more like a band aid and wanted to see what else could be done.

      I already have some quikrete from a previous project and I'm ok with using it for the most part but my knowledge is extremely limited.

      I actually already bought the hydraulic cement as well but wanted to see what other options exist before I pulled the trigger.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I literally have no idea what I'm doing
        So talk to a contractor.
        Part of doing it yourself is knowing when you're beyond your own skill and finding someone that won't frick your house up.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I probably should get an estimate. Honestly I'm just going to do that first and then go from there. The house is pretty cobbled together and I feel like it was built by people going beyond their skill level.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Make a stiff mortar mix and fill it up, no one's Gonna know

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >listening to a home inspector
    In my experience with these people I’m honestly surprised they don’t write their reports using half chewed crayons.

  14. 1 month ago
    Prez/o/

    It doesn’t look structural and I doubt it’s on a footing.
    There was likely an access opening in the foundation at one point in time and they decided to close it up.
    PL some plywood over the gap and call it a day.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Checked. But thats good to know, youre probably right its just this whole fricking house is like stitched together so if it's all done moronicly it wouldn't surprise me. I just ended up calling a contractor to come get a second opinion on this shit, he'll be over next Tuesday.

      Question: Are you in an area that experiences floods or earthquakes?

      Not particularly prone to flooding where I am, I'm in the Midwest.

      Honestly though, you anons really have made me feel a lot better about all this shit. I was basically able to buy this house because of PrepHole so I figured it would be fitting to come here to fix it. You guys are all fricking based and I truly appreciate all of you.

      I will update with more pictures from the crawlspace this weekend and see if there is anything else to be determined from additional pictures.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What is going on in this thread. Only one other anon realized that concrete this thin, under the siding (and not the structural part of the wall) is non-bearing.

    • 1 month ago
      Prez/o/

      >anon

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I never look at the name field. Fine, namegay. Even worse then.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        apologies Mr. prez/o/

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Question: Are you in an area that experiences floods or earthquakes?

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