I need to build two lean-to's to dump a bunch of shit into, a roughly 10Lx5Wx6H and a 12Wx8Lx10H.

I need to build two lean-to's to dump a bunch of shit into, a roughly 10Lx5Wx6H and a 12Wx8Lx10H. I am going to use plywood siding panel for the sides, plywood for sheathing the floors and roof, but don't know what to use for roofing material.
What is the best combination of cost, durability and ease of installation between asphalt roll, metal roofing and shingles? Seems like all of them have hidden costs aside the actual initial material costs,I supposed metal would be the best but also would be irritating to work with, roll would be the easiest but how good is it? I'm partial to shingles just to get some experience in the evntuality that knowing my luck I'd have to replace my roof myself.
It's already going to be expensive, so I'd like to minimize costs and maximize space, what is the minimum overhang and pitch needed for a smaller shed that might encounter perhaps 18 inches of snow?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What are you building the "lean-to's up against? Normally you match the construction style and materials of the building you are putting a lean-to onto. Match the roof pitch if you can, but some people change the roof pitch at the attachment point of the lean-to.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Being free standing doesn't preclude a structure from being a lean-to. Technically what I am referring to it's just a single slope, but when I've searched for sheds, I see basically everyone referring to them to as lean-to's despite not having one wall being that of an existing structure.
    Aesthetics are not a concern outside of it visually looking shoddy from poor craftsmanship, not stylistic choices.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      also some "shed" type stables share the freestanding design similar to lean-to.

      I'd be concerned about floor rot too, if one side is going to be open. if it's not then you might consider A frame construction instead, very popular in heavy snow areas.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's just going to be a shed, nothing will be open. Behind the shop add-on on the garage there is a 5x10 space so that genuinely would need to be a single slope to fit and not look moronic, it has to be shorter because of the window back there on the shop. That one is not necessarily a sure thing, but I would like to have it to put all the powered equipment in to maximize space in the yard shed, that bigger one mentioned.
        I have been considering metal sheds so I obviously must not be that concerned about snow, the example is likely extreme but I also can't see a 16" spaced roof with thick plywood caving that easy, so an A frame would be odd to do given it's just a shed.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I've had this thing in Colorado for 10+ years, even moved it intact from last house to this one. It solves the lean-to (and A frame) problem as well of a lot of wasted storage space.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The combined dimensions of both structures is 1200 cubic feet, not a comparable use case.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I mean it is for what you described putting behind the garage under the window especially considering a 10' long anything is going to be a fricking ass pain to access when it's only 6' high at the peak of the single sloped roof. Were you going to have two 5' wide 4' high doors or what?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                One 5' door at the end, it's sole purpose is to put the lawn tractor that rarely gets used, a lawn mower and a snow blower in it. It is useless space and would free up a very large amount of floor space in the garage.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >OP is doing cave explorer shed

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >The combined dimensions of both structures is 1200 cubic feet, not a comparable use case.

              Shipping container is though... Sounds like I'd rather have a shipping container than your lean-tos that aren't even leaning on anything....

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                a 10x10 metal shed is $700, a container is $7000. op is trying to spend like <$70 apparently.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Where was any implication of costs, the question was roofing materials.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                40' high cube around here is around $3000-3500. And I live in the absolute middle of the continental United States about as far away from any port as possible.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >a container is $7000

                Location and GRADE?

                40' one-trip grade (effectively brand new) with doors on both ends could sometimes approach $7K delivered a couple of years ago but prices fluctuate considerably. "WWT" (Wind and Water Tight) is made up for containers withdrawn from maritime service for cumulative damage like rust, patched holes and especially bad end door gaskets (which only matter if you need those but definitely compromise water and atmospheric intrusion).

                WWT will do for basic storage and are of course quite rugged, but best to inspect before delivery to get one of the better ones.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    corrigated metal or any metal slab roof. all you want to do is protect the plywood from rotting. put some wrap down first and then just screw the metal roof on.

    shingles are easy, you don't need experience. it's literally just nailing each row on. they even have marks for where to nail.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Tarp, ropes, done.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Metal roof is the way to go, you dont have to have a solid plywood roof underneath unless you want to.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The thing that has me hesitating is the length of the panels. If they are 8 feet long, then you have the slop of the roof, plus a bit of an overhang, I didn't do the math but that would force it to be probably closer to 7 foot instead of 8 for the front to back of the shed.
      How well does it stand up to hail?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > pitch
    2/12 is minimum, 4/12 is okay. Don’t use pitch to make the snow load less, it almost never works like intended, just make sure you frame the roof accurately for snow load.

    > roofing material
    I think bituminous corrugate is the best in the cost vs ease of installing trade off. It’s easy to work with, almost maintenance free (just rake the mosses off every two years), lasts forever. The PVC supports are like $0.20 a piece and you don’t need much else. If you overhang and keep the ends open you get some natural ventilation.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why the frick does every moron think it's a tarp, it literally says plywood in the post. I just don't want to spend $400 on a roof

      >The combined dimensions of both structures is 1200 cubic feet, not a comparable use case.

      Shipping container is though... Sounds like I'd rather have a shipping container than your lean-tos that aren't even leaning on anything....

      I'm not putting in a fricking storage container, I used volume as a frame of reference because for some reason that moron thought a tiny injection molded box that costs half as much as I want one of the sheds to be would somehow work when what was originally described was fricking 20x the size. If I thought a container was a viable solution I would have bought one already.

      > pitch
      2/12 is minimum, 4/12 is okay. Don’t use pitch to make the snow load less, it almost never works like intended, just make sure you frame the roof accurately for snow load.

      > roofing material
      I think bituminous corrugate is the best in the cost vs ease of installing trade off. It’s easy to work with, almost maintenance free (just rake the mosses off every two years), lasts forever. The PVC supports are like $0.20 a piece and you don’t need much else. If you overhang and keep the ends open you get some natural ventilation.

      Is this a specialized material, I'm seeing pounds and alibaba in initial searches so I'm to assume this is more of a European type product.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        > Is this a specialized material, I'm seeing pounds and alibaba in initial searches so I'm to assume this is more of a European type product.
        Sorry bituminous was the only name I could come up with but I now think it’s a British term, Americans call them asphalt (corrugate) roof panels. It is pretty much the same in terms of durability as asphalt roll but with the advantage of being stiff panels

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