How to make this?

So pic related is a wall veneer but it costs 500$/m2
I just need a 22x15cm piece as decoration for the TV stand I'm making.
Any way to create this (but thinner) with a router or something else? Doesn't have to be this exact design, but something ribbed.

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For reference, it will be this part.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      lmao this guy uses centimeters and graphing paper

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wait, don't you?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I use millimeters and AutoCAD

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            For wood working?

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              yes

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn't it be easier to either buy dowels and split the in hald and glue in place or use pieces of half-round trim/molding, instead of a router?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >half-round trim/molding
      Ayy that sounds like a good idea, just stick it on some hardboard and paint it all black. Those cooks at the furniture parts store are crazy using a CNC machine.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        CNC is fine for economies of scale especially when they get such high markups.

        https://i.imgur.com/k1Y3mKm.jpg

        You can buy just the half round moulding and attach it to 1/4 ply or mdf...

        ^is the voice of wisdom.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >buy dowels and split
      can split them easy on a bandsaw
      drill a block of wood same diameter as dowel
      split that
      you now have two saddles the right size for clamping to bed and feeding dowel
      glue and finishing brad

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Tell me "I've never actually done this" without saying "I've never actually done this".

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >tell me you've never actually done this and you're just tipping your welakshully fedora in ignorance
          because it fucking works

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >make pointless unnecessary fixture that does absolutely nothing to solve the real problem of ripping a dowel in half for the end use in question

            >because it fucking works

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I agree.
          This would only cut them in half and do they exact thing op wanted.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, or just a normal fence and a featherboard to maintain contact.

            The biggest issue with splitting dowels is keeping the part perfectly aligned on the axis it wants to rotate on since there's no corners or flats to key in on the fence or table. For some rip cuts on round stock you can screw/ tack/ hot glue a block or flat piece of scrap to create that key, but you're often limited by the fence/table length. Also dowels are notoriously not straight and prone to further warping when cut lengthwise.

            Easiest way without a shaper would be to just get some wide flat stock the whose thickness = the diameter you need, make as pass on each side with a router to round the edge over, then slice off that section using a table or bandsaw and repeat until you have the amount you need. This will give you a flat back without the twists and variations that come with splitting round stock (which won't render a full 180° arc), that coincidentally become WAY obvious when you start gluing those cuts next to each other.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You can buy just the half round moulding and attach it to 1/4 ply or mdf...

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    3D print it

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You could use a fluted router bit

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sorry, I meant a rounding over bit like this pic.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fiddling with dowels and half-rounds could get frustrating. You would also need a jointer in order to get them to seat seamlessly together. Unless you spend a lot of time perfecting your glued up dowel boards, you'll be able to tell they were glued up dowels. Besides, dowels and half-round are not cheap. You can get a dowel maker, but then you just keep adding more work. If they use a CNC machine to do that, then all you need to do is find the bit they use, (I think might be right) and then make yourself a jig to repeat the design the whole way down your board. I would go this route. A well-made router sled could do it. Or something similar, but modified. Or a router table. It all depends.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          21 dollars for 8 feet. Canadian
          https://www.rona.ca/en/product/metrie-half-round-moulding-classic-natural-pine-5-16-in-t-x-5-8-in-w-x-8-ft-l-msp12612-61425426?catalogId=10051&storeId=10151&langId=-1

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >You would also need a jointer in order to get them to seat seamlessly together.
          Not if you make your own half-round as described in

          Yes, or just a normal fence and a featherboard to maintain contact.

          The biggest issue with splitting dowels is keeping the part perfectly aligned on the axis it wants to rotate on since there's no corners or flats to key in on the fence or table. For some rip cuts on round stock you can screw/ tack/ hot glue a block or flat piece of scrap to create that key, but you're often limited by the fence/table length. Also dowels are notoriously not straight and prone to further warping when cut lengthwise.

          Easiest way without a shaper would be to just get some wide flat stock the whose thickness = the diameter you need, make as pass on each side with a router to round the edge over, then slice off that section using a table or bandsaw and repeat until you have the amount you need. This will give you a flat back without the twists and variations that come with splitting round stock (which won't render a full 180° arc), that coincidentally become WAY obvious when you start gluing those cuts next to each other.

          , or use quality commercial molding, both of which leave a slight straight shoulder area that a ripped dowel doesnt have.

          >Unless you spend a lot of time perfecting your glued up dowel boards, you'll be able to tell they were glued up dowels.

          The dowel thing is dumb, but beadboard panels usually look better and more authentic when assembled from parts as opposed to being made as panels grooved to look like separate parts, the same way real paneling looks better than fake paneling.
          Also, plowing the bit that other anon posted through a wood panel accurately is a *lot* easier said than done unless you have CNC or a shaper with rigid power feed capabilities...even then tool chatter is always a concern and adds instantly recognizable fakeness to fake beaded/fluted paneling.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >500$/m2
    no shit? got a listing?
    can make this much cheaper
    selling it at 80% their price is almost pure profit

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm from Serbia, here is the price. 1$=~107RSD

      lmao this guy uses centimeters and graphing paper

      I'm just making a simple MDF TV stand, why would I waste time on intricate design? It's my first ever carpentry project. Instead of insults, suggest?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >MDF
        Just use real wood it's not much more expensive tbh

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It’s also the worse option for a decorative piece like this, MDF is dimensionally stable, isotropic and always flat

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a set builder/scenic painter, and we made a bar front recently that this in the same way as your sketch, but all the way along. We got it ordered in, tons of it. I remember thinking "what sort of device cuts this thing, it must look insane". Respect to you for trying to make it yourself!

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unless you really want the wood look, I'd be tempted to do this with plaster. You either make a mould (3d printing) or you cut the inverse shape into a piece of metal and scrape that across a pile of plaster. Maybe make a jig so you're scraper is held steady.

    Or even just 3d print the entire thing.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Plaster on wood furniture??

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >22x15cm
    3d print whatever pattern you like

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