How to drill a hole inside a cement block without it, splitting into two

Previously I tried to use a hammer and chisel to make a hole inside the cement brick however it split into two , instead of being one hole piece. So now I'm using a drill instead however, I am now concerned about overheating and hole size being too much for just a small drill. What are some alternative ways to drill a hole inside theses cement blocks? For context I'm trying to use these bricks as weights for weight lifting. The hole is 1 1/4 inches

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I have just thought about just straight up, drill multiple times, in the same hole, instead of buying 1 big drill bit I'll use once. Would this work or no?

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Borrow a hammer drill or keep increasing bit size for hours.

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    You can rent a bosch rotary hammer at home depot or lowes for like $40. It's the only way to do this. Or you could dick around with your shitty drill for 7 hours, eventually breaking the rock out of rage. The choice is yours.

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    just cut it in half and cut 1.5 inch notches on both halves in the middle

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    homie bruh just use a cement drill bit

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    You would be better off making a weight plate mould and pouring concrete yourself.

    There are stacks of videos because of covid on how to make concrete weights at home, which are better than what you are trying to make now. When you pour your own you can put rear in for added weight and rigidity
    I can't see your pavers lasting very long

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Rear = rebar

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Use a masonary bit or a coring bit. Try putting the block in a tub of water while you drill.
    Better yet, just go on craigslist and look for used weights or cruise around on garbage day. I see them on the curb every week.

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    use a diamond hole saw. use a piece of timber with a hole of the same size as a guide to ensure a straight cut

  9. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Drill several small holes in the outline of a circle then you have a chance of knocking it out with a chisel / sds chisel.

  10. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Buy two buckets, some grip tape, some quickcrete and some rebar. Boom weights.

  11. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Why is this garbage so popular in Europe? Why make bricks out of concrete if you can just pour it where it's needed and not need to deal with making sure the pattern is straight? These things look disgusting and they have taken over every street in the past 20 years.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Why make bricks out of concrete if you can just pour it where it's needed and not need to deal with making sure the pattern is straight?
      Much easier and cheaper to get under that for maintenance if you need it.

  12. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    hmm water changes the harmonic resonance in glass making more difficult to shatter water might be helpful cools the bit from expanding once it has started to penetrate moves spoil away becomes an energy damper for vibrations.

    I would use a large body of water before i did moving water but the former is unlikly to be seen on a job site

  13. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Give up now OP. You can't even type a subject line without splitting it into two.

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