Hey?

Hey /k/ got a p38 here with the receiver made in 1943 by walther, the frame however appears to be made by Mauser in 1944. What im wonder is the marks stamped over the frame serial, does anyone know what it is and why it was stamped over? Or who may have done it? It was also restamped on the other side to match the number on the receiver but it looks like the original was poorly stamped over?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It means someone replaced the frame dipshit, that gun is worthless without matching serial lmao. How much did you spend to get a "real" ww2 Walther? $1500? Lol moron

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >It means someone replaced the frame dipshit
      I'm assuming OP wants more information than the obvious. Who replaced it exactly? Are those official armory markings? If so, which one and when?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >stamped over the frame serial
    You are going to jail for federal violations of the 1968 GCA. Loser.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Har har very funny

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I know it was likely replaced butthole I just want to know if anyone recognizes those stamp symbols. Was this done by a military? For import? Was it just made like that?

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    looks like the letter "ж". soviet capture maybe

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's interesting, do you know what that symbol means or any examples of the red army stamping it on ther guns?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's not my particular field of autism. Try asking /msg/. Down the hall second door on the right

        [...]

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Any russians want to comment on this, best I can tell it means "zh" and isn't really a word?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's a letter that makes the sound "zh" not a word. ex. "жypнaл"

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Any idea why that would be stamped on the gun. I see it means zh but how does it relate?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            since there seemstto be several of these symbols in a row over the serial number, perhaps the intention was to obscure it, for whatever reason?

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Yes that is what I think. The US Army uses an X stamp for the purpose of destroying the old number. Hoping someone can confirm whether or not this is the case. On this particular Walther the opposite side of the frame was stamped to match the receiver so I think it's likely they crossed out the old number but again, wnt to confirm

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                And also why they might use a Russian letter "zh", perhaps the equivalent of our English X

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably a Russian re-arsenal. A lot of the P38's in the last decade or so were imported from Russia. Good luck finding details on Soviet stamping of captures. There might be a niche boomer gun forum out there that is tracking these markings.
    My father's AC42 marked P38 has the slide's original serial X-ed out and force matched with the frame, with a new serial number stamping. Based on that, I think this yours is just an expedient way of X-ing out the frame serial.
    I am curious when these guns were re-arsenaled, whether it was during wartime or done for the export market.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I will say, my father's uses a traditional looking Latin letter "X" over the slide serial, not this Russian symbol. But I think for the same purpose.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I’ve got a Russian capture G98/40.
      Every single part on the rifle with the experience or barrel and recorder are non-matching. The metal parts and the wood were refinished at some point during Soviet ownership too, probably to keep all the captured WWII arms standardized. I knew they also did this with captured mausers and small arms too, but not pistols. Makes sense I suppose if your handgun turns out to be an RC example.

      Not the USSR, but the Yugoslavs re-arsenaled plenty of weapons in the 1940s and 50s after WWII. Plenty of Czech, German, Yugo, Serbian, and other Mausers and even guns like the M95M and more were standardized before being replaced wholesale by the M48 and other yugo small arms of the era. The Yugos downscaled usage of the M48 when the SKS and M64/70 came along but they still kept rifled in storage and refurbished them every few years before submerging them in cosmoline again.
      > was during wartime or done for the export market.
      After WWII. The red shellac coating you see on so many Mosins and other guns occurred after WWII.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sorry RC? Does that stand for russian capture?

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    sell it

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No I like it

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