Hello?

Hello PrepHole, I want to build a writing hut/shed in a small, flat bit of woodland clearing not far from my house. I've put up basic tool sheds before but I have some questions for this:

>how do I keep bugs/dirt/damp out? Is basic sealant/layering/laquer okay?
>How do I ensure a flat surface for a writing table/desk? Other sheds I've built have warped floors.
>I don't live in an area known for break-ins, but is there anything better than a padlock for securing the door?
>What kind of stove do you guys recommend for heating and brewing a bit of tea?

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not helping with your question but do you know of any good books, websites, etc that describe the process of building a basic 4-walled insulated structure including foundation, walls, roofing, etc?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Probably not in the detail you're looking for, but this one might have some nifty ideas about insulation and design.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Doesn't matter, you're not going to do anything, or ever write anything.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm a published author. Don't project, fag.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how do I keep bugs/dirt/damp out? Is basic sealant/layering/laquer okay?
    This is a big topic that can affect just about everything in your build. But yes, the methods you mention are probably sufficient for a simple shed.
    >How do I ensure a flat surface for a writing table/desk? Other sheds I've built have warped floors.
    This is usually caused by a combination of frost heave and settling. The easiest way to deal with these on a small shed is to build on blocks with some wooden shims. As the structure moves, you jack up the floor and add/remove shims as necessary. Another option is helical pile foundations, which work very well in soft rock-free soils.
    >I don't live in an area known for break-ins, but is there anything better than a padlock for securing the door?
    For something like this you're actually better off if you use a cheap padlock. That way the damage and repair cost will be minimal if someone does break in. Just don't keep anything valuable inside (tools etc).
    >What kind of stove do you guys recommend for heating and brewing a bit of tea?
    Propane heater and camp stove/BBQ. Simple and effective. Although please do be conscious of the ventilation requirements to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. I suggest installing a battery operated monoxide detector just in case.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I don't live in an area known for break-ins, but...

    This ignores the rampant practice of organized rings of poetry theives who target these dens of solitude and then, when the unsuspecting literary genius is off for a walk filled with inner reflection (or drunk), use all manner of sophisticated devices and methods to gain entry and steal raw verses for sale on the highly profitable underground poesy market.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Can confirm

      T.poetry bandit

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how do I keep bugs and damp out
    You don't you just minimize them
    >how do I ensure a flat writing surface
    A level and some pennies
    >anything better than a pad lock?
    A simple sign that says trespassers will be shot
    >what kind of stove for tea
    A fire pit outside is also good for reflective thinking

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how do I keep bugs/dirt/damp out?
    You don't, you make them into allegorical/methaphorical devices in service of larger themes or into an impish, wisecracking partner/foil that accompanies your protagonist on his adventures and wears a waistcoat...possibly all of the above.

    >Is basic sealant/layering/laquer okay?
    Only if you ingest them as a means of developing a "dream-like" nonsense dialog for the insects, or to treat rheumatic fever, consumption or "female complaints".

    Bro, it's like you don't even literature.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Build a floor on treated beams.
    Level the floor leaving your support points (like corners open. Dig in a block of treated wood or concrete under the supports and level it. Cut more treated wood for posts that match the distance from your block to the beams. Brace the legs. The bigger the structure the bigger the beams/posts

    Leaving more than a foot of clearance from the ground will keep rats etc from seeing there. More importantly keep your garbage secure and more than fifty feet from the building.

    Once you’ve built your floor build walls etc normally. I recommend making the dimensions match multiples of plywood. Like 16’ etc.
    Don’t build too tight, ventilation will keep mildew from flourishing.

    A lot depends on the soil on the site. The better drained areas won’t be as bad for frost heave.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      When I say not too tight, I mean have some ventilation. I don’t mean leave gaps in your joints or anything.
      I have a few structures ranging from decks too whole cabins supported this way.

Your email address will not be published.