Good idea to wrap some heat shield around my window unit (leaving holes for vents of course)?

Good idea to wrap some heat shield around my window unit (leaving holes for vents of course)?
It just doesn't perform the same when it's 113 degrees out.

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well uh block the direct sun on it...

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Good idea to wrap some heat shield around my window unit
      No, it isn't. You'll only overheat the unit by doing that.

      This anon gets it

      https://i.imgur.com/7zYIlQ6.jpg

      Speaking of window units.
      A guy at work said that they need to have water in them because the fan splashes water onto the condenser coil to help cool it off.
      I think this is fucking ridiculous and always drill a hole in the bottom of the unit so water never sits in it. My thinking is they purposely let water sit in the unit so that it will slowly rust and eventually break forcing you to buy a new one.
      Who's right?

      >Who's right?
      Neither of you. The real reason they are designed like this is so that the AC isn't constantly pissing water out of the bottom. Letting it drain freely causes puddles, and if you're in a building with a bunch of apartments all dumping water you can create a hazardous situation - someone could slip in the water, it could promote mold or moss growth, and given enough time it will erode concrete.
      Keeping the condensate water in the unit prevents all of this, and has the added benefit of improving efficiency if you use a flinger to spray it onto the condenser. Excess water left in the unit should evaporate between cycles.

      So when water collects in the bottom of the unit this is normal?

      Yes.

      A perfectly running ac can only lower the temperature so much. Reduce the size of the room or get a second unit.

      Yes, to a point. Once your outdoor temp exceeds 90 the unit is going to lose capacity due to the excessive heat load.

      >A guy at work said that they need to have water in them because the fan splashes water onto the condenser coil to help cool it off
      That is 100% absolute bullshit. Does putting water on the coil cool down the coil faster? Yes, sure. However it's not "needed" for the unit to operate, and there is no A/C unit that is designed to do that on purpose. If the fan on the compressor is throwing water around, then something isn't operating correctly.

      >That is 100% absolute bullshit. Does putting water on the coil cool down the coil faster? Yes, sure. However it's not "needed" for the unit to operate
      No, but it does improve the efficiency.
      >there is no A/C unit that is designed to do that on purpose
      All modern window ACs are designed to do this.
      >If the fan on the compressor is throwing water around, then something isn't operating correctly.
      Incorrect. The fan blade is designed with a "flinger", it looks like a band of metal wrapped around the edge of the fan blade. It picks up condensate water and "flings" it onto the condenser coil.

      BTW, never drill a drain hole in your window unit. It's too easy to drill into coils and then your unit is fucked.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That won't really have much effect on it. The reason it stops working when it's really hot outside is because the higher temperature air cannot soak up as much heat from the coil. It's the same reason a heat pump doesn't work very well when it's really cold outside.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I see.

      Put that shit in your windows, it will do more good there.

      My windows are insulated.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Speaking of window units.
    A guy at work said that they need to have water in them because the fan splashes water onto the condenser coil to help cool it off.
    I think this is fucking ridiculous and always drill a hole in the bottom of the unit so water never sits in it. My thinking is they purposely let water sit in the unit so that it will slowly rust and eventually break forcing you to buy a new one.
    Who's right?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Who's right?
      You're not.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        So when water collects in the bottom of the unit this is normal?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yes. There's a small pan under the condenser fan which kicks water onto the condenser coil (the one on the outside, where the refrigerant is cooled before it is compressed back into a liquid.) The evaporative water cooling makes the system more efficient.
          As for it corroding the unit, those parts are already outside. And the condensate water filling the pan is a whole lot more pure than anything the rain will throw in it.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >A guy at work said that they need to have water in them because the fan splashes water onto the condenser coil to help cool it off
      That is 100% absolute bullshit. Does putting water on the coil cool down the coil faster? Yes, sure. However it's not "needed" for the unit to operate, and there is no A/C unit that is designed to do that on purpose. If the fan on the compressor is throwing water around, then something isn't operating correctly.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        some OLD window shakers had a slinger on the fan for blowing excess water on the condenser.
        I have not seen that feature on any relatively recent models.

        It was (IIRC) to deal with water that was not draining fast enough, not to improve efficiency.

        If I come across one of my old AC manuals, I'll post the images and text related to this.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I just installed a 5000 btu unit in a small office two weeks ago. The instructions literally said there's a rubber plug on the bottom, for max efficiency leave it in, BUT, you can take it out if the noise bothers you.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >If I come across one of my old AC manuals, I'll post the images and text related to this.

          I just installed a 5000 btu unit in a small office two weeks ago. The instructions literally said there's a rubber plug on the bottom, for max efficiency leave it in, BUT, you can take it out if the noise bothers you.

          This is my GE I bought last year.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Interesting-
            In my defense, I tend to keep wall mount/window mounts a LONG time.
            So, the last one I picked up was ~20 years ago.
            It's still working fine.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              To be fair even with water in them there's not a whole lot they can go wrong with a window shaker as long as it's not some wifi enabled smart garbage. I have a buddy with one from the 80s that still works, and one I bought in 2011 still works just fine.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It doesn't explicitly need water, but it helps. Iirc it's designed in a way so that in a propely leveled unit air flow around the fan makes water puddle in the pan when it works but lets it drain after it stops.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Put that shit in your windows, it will do more good there.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No as it will accomplish nothing. Insulating the windows or tinting is what to do.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A perfectly running ac can only lower the temperature so much. Reduce the size of the room or get a second unit.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sneaking in this threadwith my AC problem.
    Last year, indoor part started icing. As it was close to rain season, I just shut it off. Technician came in March, did a refill of gaz, tested, it was fine.
    Last week a heat stress, but all the AC does is like a simple fan. No icing, but no cold either.
    Another AC, same model, same side, works well.
    Did I shot the compressor by running for day or two when iced, or something else ?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Did I shot the compressor by running for day or two when iced, or something else ?
      Something else. Either your leak has gotten worse, the capacitor went bad, or the compressor did indeed die. The compressor is cooled by returning refrigerant, so when your system gets low the compressor runs hotter and pulls more amps, which the capacitor doesn't like. If the compressor is dead it's from running lower on charge for a long time not a two day icing.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Technician came in March, did a refill of gaz, tested, it was fine.
        He could've failed to reseal the system properly or fucked up something else so the gas completely escaped during these few months

        Thank You.
        So I'm good for another refill, but running a bit longer to see if it still leaks.
        Here, they charge about $100 for intervention (ladders, stuff, it's outside on second floor) - or $400 for a whole new AC.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you have to refill it again, consider adding a leak sealer like Easy Seal. It doesn't always work but if it does it could extend the life of your unit.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            This may be the solution, I remember before the trouble it was windy, the pipes may have moved - the leak could be anywhere.

            With a small leak it might be not evident until several weeks later . Have them run through the entire system with a leak detector after refilling, those things are very sensitive and can find tiniest leaks you won't even notice with soap water. If they don't have one you're probably better off finding someone else for the job.

            You give too much creditto our "pros". The best qualification here is "he can carry the bottle of refill, manometer and a few tools up the ladder - and hasn't broke his neck - yet".
            The one i have is quite carefull, usually does a good job, but I doubt I'll find a better equipped one soon. Price-wise, it makes sense, when AC arrives at it's third refill - it's time to scrap and get a new one.
            I'm quite jealous of my downstairs neighbor, he has an old Hitachi one, his pipes are finger-thick, brazen elbows, all sealed, and running on freon for almost thirty years - nothing to do except cleaning filters now and then.
            Unfortunately, this stuff isn't on market anymore.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          With a small leak it might be not evident until several weeks later . Have them run through the entire system with a leak detector after refilling, those things are very sensitive and can find tiniest leaks you won't even notice with soap water. If they don't have one you're probably better off finding someone else for the job.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Technician came in March, did a refill of gaz, tested, it was fine.
      He could've failed to reseal the system properly or fucked up something else so the gas completely escaped during these few months

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