Fully printable guns ?

Fully printable guns ?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Usually you need to sinter the printed piece which makes it complicated. You can already print metal guns but it's very expensive and much more work than you might be thinking unlike plastic 3d which cheap and dead simple

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >you need to sinter

      I never thought about it but now I have

      >welding
      >soldering
      >sintering

      What's the difference?

      • 1 month ago
        Sieg

        Metal 3d printers work weird,

        You need to flood the chamber with argon like your rig welding, spread special titanium dust, uses a laser to temporarily adhere titanium dust to other layers

        Then you break off the supports and clean the excess trapped titanium powder

        Post process and sinter the part

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        as i understand it sintering is like firing pottery in a kiln. for machining bits like a tungsten carbide cutter the TC powder is pressed into its shape and then sintered in a kiln, the resulting piece shrinking down some % to its final size

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        soldering = two things get glued together
        welding = two things get pushed together until they stick, glue optional
        sintering = melt 200 little things and let the puddle cool into 1 thing

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        By definition welding uses the base materials, heats them up to the point of fusion, and they become continuous. A process like for example spot welding takes the two pieces you want to join and creates a pocket of fused materials. When you use rods or wire you're adding a filler material to bridge a gap between metals.
        Soldering joins two pieces of a base material with a different metal which has a lower melting point. The solder is heated up to its fusion temperature but the base material isn't.
        Sintering is a process where you can take powdered metal and a binder, create a part out of this powder, and then heat it up until the grains start bonding. Since the heat does not achieve fusion temperature your metal doesn't turn into a puddle so the shape is retained (but shrinkage occurs), allowing you to manufacture complex parts while the metal is easily worked in powder form, and then your final part is made out of solid metal without requiring casting, forging or machining from stock. But it is not a simple process and improper sintering results in the famous "MIM parts" that people complain about in Sigs and 1911s.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Fully printable guns ?
    You wouldn't be able to afford them.
    >metal printers and metal powders are expensive...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      fuddlore

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        NTA but I've been looking into it for potentially starting a suppressor company. Minimum buy in for anything titanium is around 120k, usually 60-80k for the machine and an additional 40k for after process/heat treating.
        And that's for one machine printing.
        Not including the absurdly high cost of the powders.
        Strictly talking true metal printing, not shit embedded FDM.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The gun is the easy part. The hard part is the ammunition.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      %3D

      Electrical ignition, get with the fricking times grandpa.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >7 rounds in 22 seconds
        lol
        lmao

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          How many rounds did it take to kill Shinzo Abe, moron?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That single event exposed how easy it can be and what a farce gun control is. Black powder from fireworks, a cigarette lighter, steel balls, steel pipes, tape, and a piece of wood. I'm shocked we're not seeing more of that design in use. You could even set them up in a multiple barrel array or have multiple pistols in a pirate bandolier.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              The means to kill are very common, the motivation to do so is what's much rarer. Ask yourself why Shinzo Abe would have to be shot and why the world press/governments cared so little when it happened.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah well no one's shitting up every discussion of home made weapon designs going "what am I supposed to do with this you cant even print me a [will to combat my enemies]"

                You are right in that even before 3d printing or electric pipe guns there was nothing stopping the non American from arming himself with a home made musket or crossbow or bomb or even jumping through the hoops of legal ownership in his shithole, and that his whining and b***hing about having no access to guns was always just excusing himself, but this, at least, gives more ammunition to shut his perennial canned replies the frick up.

                The fact is noguns from nogunsistan like to comfort themselves as life gets worse and worse saying "I would if I could, I'm better than Americans because they have guns but don't revolt, but if I had a gun I'd tear this whole fricker down", and they'll ignore any path to actually getting that gun.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Shinzo wasn't laughing about it

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >almost 19 rounds a minute
          Now THATS soldiering

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Idea.
        >direct blowback
        >ignition has two breaks in the circuit
        >one on the trigger
        >one on the front of the bolt
        >both inline on circuit
        >when circuit closes, discharge into chamber
        Gentlemen, I present the electric luty.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Where there's a will there's a way.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Buying spent brass and reloading it with nailgun blanks still forces you to rely on easily traceable components.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This isn't much of a solution because its still reliant on an easy source of ammo materials.
        Do love that spinning rat, tho.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    look at the size of the matrix, you couldn't print anything small with that even if you could afford it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well, 3D printers don't leave smooth surfaces, so no. And this particular material wouldn't be of much help for guns anyway.

      this. And it would be objectively terrible for making anything bearing pressure. This is just having a printer leave hollow voids in a part. Basically printing an ordered sponge instead of solid materials. That would create endless possible failure points in a sharply stressed part.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You can get used SLA printers for like $50 now. It's easy to print things that small these days, what's still hard is printing useful materials.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You wouldn't need to, its for larger structures. Small stuff can be made od solid metal because it's not heavy enough to justify making it a semi hollow structure.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Strength to weight ratio.
    Same shit as your bones having higher "strength to weight ratio" as steel. It's true, because steel is denser than bone. But a gun made out of bone wouldn't perform better because for a given thickness the steel will handle higher stresses. Just at the cost of higher weight.
    The reason they're boasting about this structure is that the loss in structural strength by leaving those voids will be minimal despite the weight savings being massive. It's similar to how a steel I-beam uses moment of inertia of the web to get almost the same resistance to bending as a solid square rod of steel, but while weighing a fraction of the mass. The only issue with I-beams is that they only work by bending against the web, while this structure is probably omnidirectional.
    Drilling the frick out of a titanium rod would be nonsensical. 3d printing allows you to just build the structure and not spend material on the voids that you'd have to machine out.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They have been at this shit since the late 90's. Boeing got a bunch of money for a reverse Doppler metamaterial polymer coating in 2001. God knows what they've been working on if your seeing news articles about this.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Also, the author is a Black person and this is the loosest possible interpretation of "3-D printed" that you can imagine.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The hoops you homosexuals will jump to just to avoid learning real machining skills

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Please describe how you would machine the object in OP's pic.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Bendy drill.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If you have a drill press& a lathe and the goal is to make a firearm at home, you would never ever need to machine anything resembling the object in OP's pic. Stay on topic, kiddo

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can't we already CNC guns???

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the closest /k/ has to a gunsmith is that moron who welds random shit to his glock
      no >we can't

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        There was a German guy here once who was training to be a professional gunsmith and built high-quality hunting side by sides.
        I didn't care for him though because he didn't want to sell guns to Americans.

        I have NC autism, CNC punched tape in particular, but I don't have access to real machines beyond CNC simulators and my own punchers/readers.
        Still seems to me that if you have access to lathes and CNC machines, building guns should be ez.
        How is a 3D printer so different? Except maybe cutting down material instead of building up material.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The eternal issue with using 3D printing for fine manufacturing is layer lines. Every time you try to print a curved surface, and even smooth ones to an extent, it looks like a vidya with anti-aliasing turned off. There are no TRUE curves, just arbitrarily fine stepped layers.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            True curves don't exist, they're just 1 molecule stepped layers.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              sure, but you want phase continuity and strong phases
              you know that discontinuity is where the break is going to start, that's why annealing is so important

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >if you have access
          that's the crux of the issue
          the investment in machinery, workspace, training, and power is outside the realm of 99.9% of the enthusiasts who are autistic enough to be into this sort of thing

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Slamefire shotties and cobbled-together flintlocks are within the realm of feasability for the average slob, tbh

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Yes and? I'm talking about proper firearms, not the shit you use to scam gun buybacks.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >How is a 3D printer so different?

          My thought is that with mature enough 3D printing tech you can print whatever you want off a easily shared infinitely reproducible design with much less cost. no skill or legal barrier. That's the dream anyways.

    • 1 month ago
      Sieg

      the closest /k/ has to a gunsmith is that moron who welds random shit to his glock
      no >we can't

      I can cnc mill gun lowers

      But it’s incredibly boring and tedious to do so.

      Also it will cost me more to order a nice sized chunk of 6061-t6511 extruded bar and the sizes for fixturing

      Than just buying a blemish palmetto state armory

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Metal 3D printing is nothing new. It has been viable to 3D print a whole gun for years now. The machines are very expensive
    When people talk about 3D printed guns, they mean ones made using FDM and things you can buy at a hardware store (which includes most the parts of an FDM printer)

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >metamaterial terminology being used for clickbait
    You have no idea how deep the rabbit hole for metamaterials goes.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Is that from Roswell?

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How long until we can print nukes?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just don't think this shit is that interesting. Guns are not that complicated, you can just mill out AR receivers, stamp AK receivers, etc. This thing can't make barrels, so who cares? Fully printed out of polymer at home with a few hundred dollars of equipment is a worthy goal, but if you're talking about stuff like this just learn how to be a machinist. The equipment will be cheaper, and the result will be far better. Guns were made with hand tools for most of their existence.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >rmit
    Pajeet on an education visa? That would explain the lack of enough cultural sense to post source, and the otherwise terrible OP. I assume that counts for a lot of this shit around here.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Firearms companies are stagnation incarnate, they aren't gonna drop money on SLS printers even if they were comparable in cost to their current manufacturing.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Oh look another bot thread with a Reddit screencap

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Metal 3D printing has been around for a while. The problem is SLS machines aren't anywhere near as accessible as FDM or SLA machines are.

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