Exoskeleton

Are they real ?
If so where are they ?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >anon is gooning to robots again
    Stop it, get some help

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Not getting a headstart
      I will be ready for the future.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm waiting for the robot to help me.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why would it have a navel?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      To distract you while it's moving in to snap your neck

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Look like an USB port

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, but they aren’t good enough for prime time yet and they’ll only ever be used for moving heavy shit around.

      Imagine your dick getting crushed when it malfunctions or gets hacked.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Imagine your dick getting crushed when it malfunctions or gets hacked.
        just design it out of soft components

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >implying that's a malfunction and not a feature

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Coffee. Yes. MMmmm.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Are they real?
    Yes

    >If so, where are they?
    Complex issues.

    Currently, they're just a niche tool some companies and contractors use and even then, these are likely to simple harnesses to prevent back/knee (most common workplace injury) rather than full exos.

    Battery tech isn't up to speed. We could build a fully functional exosuit similar to film/sci-fi depictions but it would only run for a few hours at best. Currently, their only application is for logistics (loading heavy stuff) and even then it's more cost effective to just have some grunts team-lift.

    You won't see Exos on any battlefield until we develop a battery that can run it for at least 48 hrs (72-96hrs is ideal for combat deployment). This also hinges on the battery being small enough for each soldier to carry a spare.

    Even then, it's application is still limited without further development; such as armor, software integration, weapons systems, life-saving mechanisms for accidents, quick release, mobility, durability, etc.

    More than likely, Exos are just the "frame" for what will be a contained/semi-contained suit of armor with modular weapons hard points. They'll be able to be linked to autonomous weapons systems, run fire solutions, and guide heavier ordinance to their targets. There are so many possible combinations of systems that could make an Exo ideal for Air Assault, Infantry Support, or Combat Engineer oriented tasks.

    That said, it's a race between bipedal autonomous units and human pilots exos. Biped Droids carrying human sized weapons is ultimately less complex to run due to not having a squishy human in it but, exos would be more resistant to hacking/jamming/ECM as the human could always just rely on visuals alone and pull the trigger the old fashioned way.

    Future is either Starship Troopers or Chappie, probably a combination of both.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I love these autist, effort post responses to time waste threads, you always get information you werent expecting.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Autism posts breeds autism posts. It's rare to find true obsessives online, it's what made the website great originally, however nowadays it's only a couple of the less spamming boards.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There might be niche uses, even when the battery only lasts a few hours. Police work comes to mind. It can be used against school shooters etc where the engagement will only last a few minutes. The military can also use it in a similar fashion as shock troopers to board ships or breach fortifications. Once they've broken through, conventional troops move in while they retreat to recharge the batteries.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Chinese have them:

      They originally developed them for general infantry applications, but they discovered that passive exoskeletons have too many limitations, so they nixed that idea. Now they're only issued to support troops in the Himalayas. They're designed to make it easier to carry heavy loads. This is probably the only passive exoskeleton in military service right now.
      Powered exoskeletons have too many issues with battery tech, as noted here:
      Another problem is control tech. If the exoskeleton doesn't respond effectively immediately to your movements, it becomes extremely fatiguing to wear over long periods of time. (Because you'd have to push against it to initiate any movement.) The two things that doomed SOCOM's TALOS program were the battery problem and the control/responsiveness problem. We're probably a decade or so out from a solution to those problems.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You say that as if they're exclusively Chinese unicorn technology and the US hasn't been fricking around with it for years.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          All of those US projects were cancelled or deprecated, though, and only a few prototypes were ever built. The Chinese actually issue what they've got, though admittedly only to a fraction of their troops who are stationed in high-altitude locations. They have thousands of them, though, which is more than can be said for any other exoskeleton.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    would

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >lust provoking image
    >time wasting question

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There was that interview with the former Uke officer who dropped that the Ukes were factoring in Exo suit use in terms of the space available in IFVs. Clearly *someone* is equipped with suits out there.

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