Drill bits for occasionally drilling steel

Do any of you have recommendations for drill bits for personal use that won't dull out in half a second like the stuff I've tried from big hardware stores? I'm not running a machine shop or anything where they'll be used extensively and need the highest quality, but I occasionally need to drill through steel things at home and would like some bits that last longer than one hole.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If your bits are shot after one hole you aren't using them properly.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OK I'll try again

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Low speed, press harder, use oil.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. Even the worst Chinese budget bits should last more than a couple holes in mild steel.

      If you're one of the many who are under the impression that steel is supposed to be drilled at high speed and light pressure, that's the exact opposite of reality. Doing that ruins cutters very quickly. Drill slow, use a lot of pressure. You want to take a pretty heavy chip.

      While you can cut dry, it's generally recommended that you use some kind of oil or coolant. Even water is better than nothing.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Use a lot of pressure

        Low speed, press harder, use oil.

        Press harder

        Huh, assuming this is accurate I learned something from PrepHole while lurking by accident.

        Now, as the scars on my hand can attest to, do not hold small metal parts with your hand—use a vice or ask your friend to hold them.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Huh, assuming this is accurate I learned something from PrepHole while lurking by accident.
          Higher speed means more friction and heat, which is what wears down the cutting surface of the bit.
          If your oil starts smoking, stop and let the bit cool down.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Higher speed means more friction and heat, which is what wears down the cutting surface of the bit.

            To elaborate
            >drill bit cuts big chip
            >friction makes heat
            >chip soaks up said heat
            >chip leaves hole clean removing heat
            Keeps workpiece and drill bit from overheating.

            The exact opposite happens when you blast your drill bit. You make small chips and metal grit that just grinds away at itself and doesnt walk the flutes well. You run much hotter, you grind and put much more wear on the bit.
            Thats why a small amount of cutting oil works so well.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Wears down the bit
            You're underestimating the effect. As the work piece heats up, it hardens. It literally becomes harder than the drill bit.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What kind of steel? It makes a big difference what steel you're drilling. Mild steel can be drilled through with ease, stainless is a b***h if you don't know what you're doing.

        This, plus start small and move up through your bit sizes. Once you've got a 1/8th pilot hole drilled, you can move up in increments of 1/8th and it'll go fairly easily, even for stainless.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Even the worst Chinese budget bits should last more than a couple holes in mild steel.
        stop lying anon
        ive had several chinese yellow drills that were factory ground without relieve, they couldnt even drill pine without re profiling

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >ive had several chinese yellow drills that were factory ground without relieve

          Okay, sorry, I kind of was just unconsciously assuming everyone has a way to sharpen drill bits. I really only meant "the steel they're made out of", rather than the bits themselves. I do have a set of micro drills that had no point ground on them (like they literally just ground the flutes on and then forgot to do the tip), which...yeah, those won't drill anything out of the box.

          I’m pretty sure you can just buy a single industrial carbide (tipped?) bit and that will last a long-ass time.

          One thing I regret is all my drill sets don’t have a 3/4” or a 1” … or even a 1/2” regular twist drill, so I should have just bought common sizes… in carbide if possible… that I actually use instead of bit sets with shit like 11/64ths in it.

          I do have 1” spade bits, but those are fricking terrible.

          >a single industrial carbide (tipped?) bit and that will last a long-ass time.
          Solid carbide drills outside of a rigid machine is just asking them to snap. Carbide is very brittle. The carbide tipped ones are okay in handheld drills, but I wouldn't recommend them for general use; only if you have to drill something too hard for even a cobalt drill to go through. Reason being that, even if the body of the drill can deal with being used by hand, the edges themselves are still somewhat fragile. They can be damaged very quickly by chatter, slight rocking of the drill, or breaking through the other side of the material too fast. Worse, they tend to chip more deeply than HSS, meaning you have to take that much more off at the grinder to clean up the edge. AND you now need a carbide or diamond wheel to sharpen it in the first place.

          If you want a drill to last, get some kind of grinder and learn to sharpen it. I still have and use one of the very first (THE very first, maybe) sets of drill bits I got. A few of them got snapped or lost, but the rest will be perfectly good until those also get broken/lost or they've been sharpened so many times there's no flute left. Considering the latter is probably not going to happen in my lifetime, that might as well be forever.

          Who gives a frick you old, anal no life b***h
          Drill a hole in metal, big goddamn fricking deal
          Queer bait pussy

          Shit get.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Muratic acid hardens store bought bits

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Get cutting oil. It'll extend your bit life exponentially.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cutting oil, knowing what speed to use depending on the material you’re cutting.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    People usually wreck bits by overheating them, usually by running them too fast and not drilling pilot holes

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >People usually wreck bits by overheating them, usually by running them too fast and not drilling pilot holes

      This. Get a pack of a hundred 1/8" cobalt bits and use them as a pilot for everything. If you're really going big step up in sizes. 1/8, 5/16, 1" etc. Don't go through all the sizes, you want to leave enough meat for the drill bit to cut with more than the edges of the flute. You want a pilot to be as large or slightly larger than the web thickness of your final bit size.

      Learn how to sharpen bits on a bench grinder, or get a Drill Dr. or something similar if you need to. Real small bits can be a real pain in the ass to sharpen by hand so that's where the Drill Dr. or other drill bit sharpeners really shine.

      I have had excellent luck with the 120 piece HF cobalt drill bit set and index. When I frick a bit up I will order a new one plus extras to keep on hand. Victor Machinery is a good place to buy bits in small quantities, or e-bay isn't bad either. I always buy cobalt bits these days. They are practically the same price as the others and just seem to hold up so much better for me.

      Step bits are bretty gud for most things. Don't get the cheapest ones off e-bay. The cheap ones from HF actually hold up quite well and the more expensive ones hold up even better. But you also have to know how to use them or you will burn them up too from drilling too fast and without enough pressure.

      High sulfur cutting oil like tap magic or plain old dark thread cutting oil is good shit.

      T. guy that drills a lot of damn holes.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you predrill holes in steel for drills under 3/4", you are a moron

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Explain yourself. This is moronic. 3/4 has a blunt profile even at 135deg. Bore a 3/4 dia hole at 6" depth with no pilot hole. It's not where you started on the other side.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ^Confirmed for drilling far fewer holes than I and being moronic. Pilot holes are far less effort since they clear the center of the larger bit which then can cut by shear rather than the crushing that takes place at the center of the large bit and is what makes using them suck, particularly horizontally or overhead.

            [...]
            Reasons not to use cobalt in the field do not exist since more cuts per bit make them cheaper than HSS etc. While bits are expendable I prefer not to waste them and the cost difference bought online is trivial.

            I also use water-based coolant or soapy (soap is a wetting agent) water applied by plastic soda bottle (drill squirt hole in cap) where convenient. There is little reason to let bits get very hot. Compressed air cools them down too.

            >Explain yourself.
            Whats is there to explain?
            On a technical level in machining, predrilling holes hurts tool sharpness and positional accuracy. Its ironic you talk about it "not being where you started", but 100/100 youll have a more concentric and on point hole with spotting over pilot drilling.

            When drilling by hand, there is literally no reason to predrill small holes.
            It doesnt take any effort to punch a 5/8" hole in solid steel, granted you are using real drill bits.
            Also while I did say under 3/4", even at 3/4" anyone who actually knows what they are doing has web thinned drills.
            This is purely a you problem, with shitty bits.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Drilling a pilot for the web isn't going to reduce your tool life. It's not going to give you oval holes either. Unless it's a split point pushing much more than 3/8 is noticable. Pilot hole is a fine practice and split points are worth the pain to grind.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Kek
                Explain to us how you track tool life, how you track positional accuracy, and how you track hole concentricity.
                This isn't disputed in industry, it's objective.

                There are absolute fricking morons telling people to drill a pilot hole for a 5/16 drill.
                People saying continually drill pilot holes in 1/8" increments in fricking stainless steel.
                And these are the people pretending they understand tool life?

                It's shadetree homosexuals who have no clue what they are doing.
                Imagine thinking people should take you seriously when drilling a 5/16 is too hard for you.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                While is being a dickhead about it, he has a point.

                You shouldn't really need a pilot drill below ~1/2". While I don't agree that it necessarily affects tool life directly, it does allow you to push an excessive chipload without much effort, which definitely WILL affect tool life. Drilling in steps exaggerates this problem. Using a 1/2" drill in a 3/8" hole will allow you to overfeed with almost no force, there's a good chance the drill will try to self-feed if it's at all sharp.

                Positional accuracy is also affected if the point of the drill isn't the first thing to make contact with the material. How badly it's affected depends heavily on the size of the hole and how good the drill you're putting into it is. For critical holes, it's a problem. For anything being drilled by hand, it's unlikely to throw things far enough off to be an issue, assuming you're not drilling in like 3+ steps.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                > pilot hole
                I think the idea is that smaller drill bits are cheaper than bigger ones, so you want to remove as much material as you can with cheaper (smaller) bits.

                If I’m not mistaken, this is why precision holes ate drilled very slightly undersized and then you use an (expensive) reamer to shave off the last thou.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                When hand drilling especially in awkward postions it's easier to make a small hole first to clear the center of the second bit. If using a prick punch then a center punch it's a bit easier to keep a small bit in the divot when starting the hole when not on a workbench. Not all holes are drilled in ideal locations.

                Reaming is to produce a round hole. Twist drills produce slightly oval rather crude holes by comparison with reamed holes which are used for things like dowel pins, bearings and bushings.

                If work is held very securely as in CNC machining where no manual force is used large holes are routinely drilled without pilot holes.

                https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/threads/when-to-use-pilot-hole-before-drilling.354924/

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          ^Confirmed for drilling far fewer holes than I and being moronic. Pilot holes are far less effort since they clear the center of the larger bit which then can cut by shear rather than the crushing that takes place at the center of the large bit and is what makes using them suck, particularly horizontally or overhead.

          There is a reason he is telling people to use Cobalt bits anon.
          His moronicness is marginally mitigated by using cobalt drills.

          Every idiot who just sends it with their drill always laud Cobalt bits for that reason.

          Reasons not to use cobalt in the field do not exist since more cuts per bit make them cheaper than HSS etc. While bits are expendable I prefer not to waste them and the cost difference bought online is trivial.

          I also use water-based coolant or soapy (soap is a wetting agent) water applied by plastic soda bottle (drill squirt hole in cap) where convenient. There is little reason to let bits get very hot. Compressed air cools them down too.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Bepis

            In all fairness with the cobalt vs HSS argument, good quality HSS are far better than Amazon “””cobalt””” bits. Especially if you’re not drilling into hardened stuff.

            Sometimes the Amazon bits are actually cobalt and properly hard, so they may last longer in some materials than good name brand HSS, but they will be far slower cutting and more work than the good HSS because they were never sharpened properly, and the cheap cobalt only overtakes the good HSS once you have totally overheated and rekt the HSS bit.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Those look brand new, how many holes have you drilled into your OSB with them?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Bepis

                $100 Viking set doesn’t really touch OSB. Those are sort of backup for real important holes where I don’t want rekt threads. I have like 3 DeWalt sets that get used all the time

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >plain old dark thread cutting oil
        I don't know if that's the best thing to use, but I've had good luck with it for most everything. It does make smoke, and doesn't remove heat near as well as water-based fluids, but it works well for milling, drilling, and tapping. Given it's also $20-30/gallon, it's by far the best value for the money.

        https://i.imgur.com/1sAO1qX.png

        Bosch CO21XX. Over the past year I spent a lot of time learning from other printNC builders, which is basically a cult for hand drilling/tapping mild steel.
        >herpa derp feeds and speeds
        You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill. The human organism has insufficient rigidity. You can try to pretend like you are a 350 rpm multi-ton drill press. But it will take you 20 minutes for the first hole, after which the experiment will end.
        You can apply as much pressure as practicable, but if you're hand drilling you are always limited by body position. Just fricking spin that motherfricker. You will always be spinning 3x or 4x too fast.
        >pic rel
        The coating is supposed to help. I have no interest in steel tooling so I didn't do much research, but it's commonly recommended. Also buy a hole-starting carbide bit (not the same as a chamfer bit).

        >You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill
        If you're not using a larger drill, it's decently sharp, and you've got a pilot hole, you definitely can. The entire point of not using an excessively large pilot in the first place is to prevent overfeeding.

        >buy a hole-starting carbide bit
        I would not recommend using a carbide drill of any kind freehand, not solid carbide, anyway. Way too brittle.

        Also WTF is a "hole-starting" bit supposed to be? You mean a spot drill?

        >I have no interest in steel tooling so I didn't do much research,
        So you're giving advice without actually knowing what you're talking about. Cool.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >you've got a pilot hole, you definitely can.
          You've just restated the most basic theory without actually understanding any of the constraints. You might as well say, "just run all your tools at the correct parameters as specified by the tool manufacturer."

          >I had no idea they sold steel spot drills
          Interesting, just like you have no idea what work hardening is.

          Imagine that, the 3D printer moron doesnt know what hes talking about in the least bit.

          >Interesting, just like you have no idea what work hardening is.
          This is objectively fricking bullshit. Plasma dross is work-hardened. You'd experience this if you tried to plasma-cut a plate and drilled it to size.
          You'd never work-harden mild steel by drilling it at 2,000 rpm instead of 350. Which is exactly what you'd be doing if you ever actually had to drill something in real life and not in a laboratory.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Tell us more about your 3D printer

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Tell us more about your 3D printer
              Everybody's seen it already, dumbass.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Everybody's seen it already, dumbass.
                Whats this even supposed to mean?
                Did your printNC post get reddit gold?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You might as well say, "just run all your tools at the correct parameters as specified by the tool manufacturer."
            When people arent strapping dremels into crappy plastic cnc routers, its pretty easy to actually drill something the way it was meant to.
            I get how unfathomable it is to you that a world exists outside of your 200RPM spindle which has no rigidity at all.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >200RPM spindle
              >200RPM
              >200
              dude, go calculate the correct drill speed on one of those online calculators / F&S Wizard / etc. and then find me that setting on your DeWalt(R) 20V MAX PRO handheld drill bit. I'll wait.
              And you leave my huanyang spindle out of this. It did nothing to you.

              >Everybody's seen it already, dumbass.
              Whats this even supposed to mean?
              Did your printNC post get reddit gold?

              >Did your printNC post get reddit gold?
              last time I got reddit gold was a post asking what laptop to buy. I ended buying a Lenovo Yoga 2, which i owned for about a week. What a terrible shitty laptop. The whole thing was so fricked the screen literally incapable of displaying the color yellow.
              And no, I don't post fabrication pics on reddit. I post those on here, along with my erection pics.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You've just restated the most basic theory without actually understanding any of the constraints

            https://i.imgur.com/1sAO1qX.png

            Bosch CO21XX. Over the past year I spent a lot of time learning from other printNC builders, which is basically a cult for hand drilling/tapping mild steel.
            >herpa derp feeds and speeds
            You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill. The human organism has insufficient rigidity. You can try to pretend like you are a 350 rpm multi-ton drill press. But it will take you 20 minutes for the first hole, after which the experiment will end.
            You can apply as much pressure as practicable, but if you're hand drilling you are always limited by body position. Just fricking spin that motherfricker. You will always be spinning 3x or 4x too fast.
            >pic rel
            The coating is supposed to help. I have no interest in steel tooling so I didn't do much research, but it's commonly recommended. Also buy a hole-starting carbide bit (not the same as a chamfer bit).

            >"You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill"
            >unconditional blanket statement

            >plain old dark thread cutting oil
            I don't know if that's the best thing to use, but I've had good luck with it for most everything. It does make smoke, and doesn't remove heat near as well as water-based fluids, but it works well for milling, drilling, and tapping. Given it's also $20-30/gallon, it's by far the best value for the money.

            [...]
            >You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill
            If you're not using a larger drill, it's decently sharp, and you've got a pilot hole, you definitely can. The entire point of not using an excessively large pilot in the first place is to prevent overfeeding.

            >buy a hole-starting carbide bit
            I would not recommend using a carbide drill of any kind freehand, not solid carbide, anyway. Way too brittle.

            Also WTF is a "hole-starting" bit supposed to be? You mean a spot drill?

            >I have no interest in steel tooling so I didn't do much research,
            So you're giving advice without actually knowing what you're talking about. Cool.

            >"If you're not using a larger drill, it's decently sharp, and you've got a pilot hole, you definitely can"
            >actually that blanket statement is not correct under these circumstances

            >uM AcTuAlLy U DoNt UnDeRsTaNd

            This has made me curious, however. And, because I'm not a keyboard warrior b***hboy, I'm willing to at lest test the claims I make.

            I sharpened a 3/16" drill and put a split point on it, all by hand. I put that on the mill at set the power feed to 0.0015"/rev. The usual recommended feed rate for drills is 0.001" per 1/16" of diameter, meaning a 3/16" drill should be fed at 0.003"/rev. As this is a freehand grind (I'll get around to that sharpening jig someday), pretty much all of the cutting is being done by one flute. Halving the feed rate should roughly compensate for this. I set the mill to 1700RPM, which is on the lower end of the 80-110SFM typical of HSS.

            While drilling freehand or with a press, there's a lot of variance in feeds/speeds depending on operator experience and whether or not they're feeling too lazy to change the belts around. But, in all practicality, this is the recommended feed/speed for a 3/16" HSS drill. With this setup, this drill requires 55-60lbf to go through 1018. Adding a 1/16" pilot hole, this drops radically. I measured just 17lbf at the same speed/feed. That's so low that the weight of a heavy drill and my arms alone could overfeed the drill in the right position.

            Also bear in mind that this is a mediocre freehand grind. A genuinely good grind cuts far more easily than what I usually manage. In other words, you absolutely can "achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill". Something those with any real world experience and wit could tell you.

            Have fun with your 3D printed toy.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The hardest bit is diamond. Then maybe carbide and titanium.

    And if you make a little mound of plumbers putty around it you can use oil or water to keep it cooled down.

    But the reality is with some substances you can only punch 2 or 3 holes and the bit is done for. When I’m drilling holes in tile I only get 2 or 3 holes and I have to throw the bit away, and that’s using titanium

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >But the reality is with some substances you can only punch 2 or 3 holes and the bit is done for. When I’m drilling holes in tile I only get 2 or 3 holes and I have to throw the bit away, and that’s using titanium

      Well you're supposed to use diamond or carbide bits on tile and glass so...

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've been using these for several years without issue.
    https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW1162-14-Piece-Black-Oxide/dp/B006EHMLHS/
    My older set had yellow plastic on top and bottom of the case - no clear top.
    I bought mine at Home Depot but Amazon came up first on a search.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The dewalt set in that video doesnt even exist anymore. Big brand stuff changes routinely, so the video is worthless.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >doesnt even exist anymore

          same set in a different box

          https://i.imgur.com/RGpLcRx.jpg

          I've been using these for several years without issue.
          https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW1162-14-Piece-Black-Oxide/dp/B006EHMLHS/
          My older set had yellow plastic on top and bottom of the case - no clear top.
          I bought mine at Home Depot but Amazon came up first on a search.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Its literally a different OEM, they are manufactured nothing alike. I know, I own several sets of both.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              ???? They're both fricking dewalt you retarted child

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Dewalt doesnt manufacture their own drill bits, neither does Milwaukee or other brands.
                Just because it says Dewalt doesnt mean anything anon.

                If you want, I can go take pictures showing you the different flute geometries, the different edge geometries, and the different rollmarks (which indicates its a different manufacturer) between the two sets.

                I didnt say your dewalt bits are bad. They are actually pretty good.
                But they objectively are different bits from the ones in the videos, which happen to also be good. It makes the video itself worthless if the next OEM change dewalt makes they go to a shitty factory.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bosch CO21XX. Over the past year I spent a lot of time learning from other printNC builders, which is basically a cult for hand drilling/tapping mild steel.
    >herpa derp feeds and speeds
    You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill. The human organism has insufficient rigidity. You can try to pretend like you are a 350 rpm multi-ton drill press. But it will take you 20 minutes for the first hole, after which the experiment will end.
    You can apply as much pressure as practicable, but if you're hand drilling you are always limited by body position. Just fricking spin that motherfricker. You will always be spinning 3x or 4x too fast.
    >pic rel
    The coating is supposed to help. I have no interest in steel tooling so I didn't do much research, but it's commonly recommended. Also buy a hole-starting carbide bit (not the same as a chamfer bit).

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >you cant achieve optimal speeds and feeds by hand, so just torch your bits due to impatience
      Great advice anon, almost as good as telling someone to run solid carbide bits in a hand drill.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I won't let you get away with misleading my flock on this cartoon forum!
        Frick your bits. The workpiece gets softer when it heats up. You're not doing it right from a physics perspective anyway so you might as well maximize the results from minimum expenditure.
        >solid carbide bits in a hand drill
        I had no idea they sold steel spot drills. I just use the same spot drill in everything -- hand drill, israeliteelry drill press, CNC milling machine collet.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I had no idea they sold steel spot drills
          Interesting, just like you have no idea what work hardening is.

          Imagine that, the 3D printer moron doesnt know what hes talking about in the least bit.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Seems like the bit would get hot before the workpiece would.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There is a reason he is telling people to use Cobalt bits anon.
            His moronicness is marginally mitigated by using cobalt drills.

            Every idiot who just sends it with their drill always laud Cobalt bits for that reason.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >You CANNOT achieve the correct chipload on a hand drill. The human organism has insufficient rigidity.

      Limp wrists typed those words.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Limp wrists typed those words.
        doesn't matter; the reaction force doesn't begin at the wrists. If I had have enough congealed jizz covering the floor maybe my feeble body can approach the awesome power of a $1 C-clamp, let alone an ordinary frickin' drill press.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Big box store drill bits vastly differ in quality.
    Everyone is right, low RPM, high pressure, cutting oil make a huge difference.
    No amount of technique will matter with some of the actual dogshit drill bits out there.

    Its all about how well the cutting geometry was ground, a lot of cheap bits are ground very poorly.
    A poorly ground bit will kind of work in wood, but wont touch steel.

    Buy a moderately priced 135 deg split point drill set from a big brand. Milwaukee, Dewalt, Irwin, Bosch etc etc. They arent actually good drill bits by a long shot, but they will drill steel and last long enough with proper technique.

    Off the top of my head, ive seen unusable grinds out of SKIL, Nu-Craftsman, Warrior from Harbor Freight, Tool Shop and TG from Menards, Ryobi, some random chinese brand I got on amazon.

    You get what you pay for, especially with drill bits.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They sell Cle-Line drill bits, which are machinist grade bits, in store at Lowes.

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/CLE-LINE-High-Speed-Steel-Twist-Drill-Bit-Set/1000043335

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/CLE-LINE-29-Piece-Black-and-Gold-JobberDrill-Bit-Set/1003166958

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Use cutting oil, use proper speed and pressure. When the shavings come out long and curly you've hit the sweet spot. Bigger bit means slowler speed

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lots of anon post for a pic with no chipload. That's 2x2 1/8 wall mild steel? 1/2 drill? Pilotholes would help. A center punch will help locate correctly when drilling large holes.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Idiots….op light pressure top speed
    Once you see smoke youre almost there.
    You want the steel to melt letting the bit remove the slag.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I buy "cobalt" alloy bits as I need them in five or ten packs online. They're far more economic in the end than HSS or titanium coated and not expensive. No need for a drill index at home since most users even advanced ones only use a few sizes. Buying packs gives me spares (I don't buy asswipe by the sheet either) and when those run low I've time to order more. I don't buy bits locally except in emergency.

    I hand drill a lot of 1/8", 3/16" and 1/4" thicc angle for shop shelving and carts so I keep 1/8" for pilot holes and 5/16", 3/8" and 1/2" bits for most of the bolts for those jobs. Being extremely lazy I leave three corded drills in my hardware bucket with bits installed so it's always ready to use.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >No need
      Sure, but you find them all the time at flea markets and pawn shops. They come with a majority of very nice cobalt-coated or HSS bits. Buy real bits. The only people who should buy jobbers are... Jobbers, because they get to charge it to their customers. "One bit, one dollar" or something to the effect. They get to drill a few holes and when they snap, customer pays for it.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Buy real bits. The only people who should buy jobbers are... Jobbers, because they get to charge it to their customers.
        What does that mean? What are real bits and what are jobbers?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Bepis

          Idk what he meant, but I have a set of HSS Viking bits in the mechanic length. They’re shorter that standard jobber length and good for drilling out bullshit without breaking the bit.

          Then I have Milwaukee cobalt for harder stuff. One day will maybe get a fancy brand of cobalt bits, but they’re not cheap.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Bepis

          Picrel shows jobber vs mechanic. I think aviation length are the longer ones.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/0E9CSHN.jpg

            Idk what he meant, but I have a set of HSS Viking bits in the mechanic length. They’re shorter that standard jobber length and good for drilling out bullshit without breaking the bit.

            Then I have Milwaukee cobalt for harder stuff. One day will maybe get a fancy brand of cobalt bits, but they’re not cheap.

            The difference is length? What makes one a "real bit" and the other not? I don't see how the length affects anything other than bending moment if you aren't keeping it straight.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Bepis

              I have no idea what that other anon was arguing for.

              After reading

              >No need
              Sure, but you find them all the time at flea markets and pawn shops. They come with a majority of very nice cobalt-coated or HSS bits. Buy real bits. The only people who should buy jobbers are... Jobbers, because they get to charge it to their customers. "One bit, one dollar" or something to the effect. They get to drill a few holes and when they snap, customer pays for it.

              I’m not sure anon knows what “jobber” is actually referring to. “Jobber” is the length of the bit, nothing else. Jobber is standard, mechanic length is stubby.

              The longer ones seem to be described as “aircraft”, not “aviation”, my bad. Picrel shows how long the aircraft bits are.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >mechanic length is stubby.
                No its not, its 3/4 length with 3 flats ground on the shank. AKA its less accurate in your chuck, and its barely any shorter so its not any stiffer.

                Machine screw length is "stubby" which is 1/2 size or shorter.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Bepis

                >it’s 3/4 length
                >you’re factually wrong because in my personal opinion, 3/4 is not “stubby”
                Ahhh the state of the interwebs

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Apologies as jobber is also a term used to refer to a length of twist drills, I did not think of that. In any other context, "jobber" is a quality grade. It's those $15 40-pack of assorted twist drills. You get 8 1/8" bits and you know they will snap if you try to use them with thick steel. A Dormer drill is a lot expensive but unless you treat it like a 200-pound gorilla would, it will outlast the cheap one and you might even give it to your grandson one day.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >200-pound gorilla
                AvE Black folk need to be shot tbh

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >What are real bits and what are jobbers?
          He thinks that "cobalt" is a coating, so pay him no mind. He is fricking stupid

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The extra effort to hunt small bits that way I don't find worth it though I'll scoop them up in bulk auction buys. Most flea market bits are garbage.

        Business auctions OTOH are great unlike overpriced pawn shops for buying tooling. I do like my machine shop ownerbro and pig out for pennies a milling cutter. I get used steel, steel shop carts (heavy custom carts build from standard stock are gloriously nice to customize), and much more for modest money.

        I'm disassembling booth related next week to bring it home. Paint jobs are absurdly expensive lately so time to DIY. My air compressors and receiver tank are also auction buys.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have found that Muratic acid works extremely well at cooling and lubricating drill bits

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    PrepHole is such a plethora of knowledge

    • 4 weeks ago
      Bepis

      >disinformation

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >disinformation

        This thread brought a lot of them out of the woodwork. No wonder this board is in such a sad state, from what I'm reading on here over half of you are incapable of drilling a hole in mild steel. And one imbecile claims you cannot drill mild steel with a handheld drill and pilot holes are useless. JFC.
        Pathetic.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Who gives a frick you old, anal no life b***h
          Drill a hole in metal, big goddamn fricking deal
          Queer bait pussy

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Found the imbecile. Hook line and sinker!

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Aww shum budy is sensative

        • 3 weeks ago
          Bepis

          Who gives a frick you old, anal no life b***h
          Drill a hole in metal, big goddamn fricking deal
          Queer bait pussy

          Kek you guys suck

          Dem digits though.

          I still say good HSS > cheap cobalt for mild steel and other softer metals. Plus if you can’t make it through mild steel with a basic set of DeWalt TiN cheap bits, then you will probably be snapping cobalt bits before you even get a hole started.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >pilot holes are useless.
          They are great if you want to kill tool life, and have oval holes, and have offcenter holes. Also great for those of us who cant afford proper drill bits.

          People like OP should be using pilot holes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Its filled with people who have 1 year of knowledge building 3D printed stuff.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >drill through steel things
    This thread is useless without knowing the material. You can cut mild steel all day with HSS, maybe touch up the edge and keep going. If you want to drill grade 8 bolts, nails, welds or whatever hard shit then it's a different conservation entirely. The only time you should see powder from your drill is drilling cast.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I’m pretty sure you can just buy a single industrial carbide (tipped?) bit and that will last a long-ass time.

    One thing I regret is all my drill sets don’t have a 3/4” or a 1” … or even a 1/2” regular twist drill, so I should have just bought common sizes… in carbide if possible… that I actually use instead of bit sets with shit like 11/64ths in it.

    I do have 1” spade bits, but those are fricking terrible.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They do sell carbide tipped standard twist drills, or even solid carbide ones. But carbide is finicky and brittle when improperly used, youll trash them in a hand drill so its never worth it unless you have a very specific reason for them.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      go on Amazon or ebay and search "silver and deming" or S&D
      you can get an 8 piece chinko set ranging from 9/16 all the way to 1" drill bits for like $30. ive had a harbor freight set for years and they drill fine, cheapest way to get big drills

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    lrn 2 sharpen bits or buy a sharpener.

    small bits spin fast with lighter pressure, bigger bits spin slower with high pressure.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >that won't dull out in half a second like the stuff I've tried from big hardware stores?
    you're drilling at too high a speed dipshit.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just drill a hole, stick a bolt in it and im done.
    You old fricks argue about senseless shit like old women.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jfc even ChatGPT knows what jobber grade means.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Bepis

      You should ask it what “jobber length drill bit” means

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Wear gloves for when it inevitably grabs and tries to take a finger from you.

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Literally just drill slower
    You can use water or machining oil to cool the bits as you drill

    This post is pretty good evidence you have no idea how to set your drill or what the settings are even for

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Put bit in drill
    Drill hole
    Done

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01C5O1YHQ?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01H9DM4UO?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title

    I like both of these sets for drilling steel. Both are made in the USA which is dope. The Drill Hog Molybendium set is super brittle though. You have to be carefull or they will snap. Cut like a champ though.

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