Do suppressors on regular revolvers just do not work AT ALL or do they lower the sound of the gunshot, but to a less effective amount than a suppresse...

Do suppressors on regular revolvers just do not work AT ALL or do they lower the sound of the gunshot, but to a less effective amount than a suppressed pistol? Sound escapes through the cylinder gap but surely not 100% of the sound.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're pretty useless. And putting a suppressor on them doesn't fix that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      just like your tiny wobbly penis

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If you say revolvers are useless, I'm going to assume you've never used a gun to protect yourself or that you've never needed to. It's just ignorance.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        T. I've shot and killed 13 gangbangers in my imagination

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's very clever but it's all you got to say because that is just the truth.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        why carry a revolver when you can carry literally anything else though. in all my years my colt and SW revolvers have had more issues than any of my other guns

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >muttshit
          oh no, it's retarded.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    cover the cylinder cap with your hand while shooting for full suppression

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Wrap it in a blanket or pillow

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Looks like a jawa gun from Star Wars

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Han Solo handgun

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can I please get non-retard answers? I got a S&W 6 incher with a threaded barrel, normally it just runs a comp, but I thought getting a suppressor would be really fucking cool for the cyberpunk aesthetic. But getting one ONLY for the aesthetic and zero practical purpose kinda sucks since the cheapest ones here are 140 bucks and I'm not swimming in cash.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The only way to suppress a revolver is to suppress the bullets themselves, the nagant bullet has baffles in the cartridge itself

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Lol no. Thats 1 way to make it silent but not the only way. Theres clamp on covers for the cylinder or built in shrouds

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Theres clamp on covers for the cylinder
          For real? I thought about something like this but I never knew it actually existed. But checking out Brownells and two other local online stores, they don't. Do you have to get them custom made for like 500 bucks or something?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Its still prototype / proof of concept stage

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You’re very wrong. The Nagant revolver fires a cartridge where the brass seals the cylinder gap, allowing more effective use of a standard suppressor. The Russians also had some cartridges where there was basically a captive piston that the powder charge would drive forward, kicking the bullet down the bore. These offered very low velocity (sub-500 fps), but did contain the blast within the cartridge so they were quiet.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Those were specialist assassination weapons. Cool stuff but not generally usable, also iirc you'd have to get a NFA stamp for each individual "bullet" lol. Did they actually use a revolver platform? Been fucking forever since I read about some of the crazy cold war assassin stuff but I thought I'd remembered them being in something custom that didn't look like a gun at all. Freely admit memory on that is blurry.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            For the russian nagant it was purely about trying to get a proper seal to squeeze as much FPS from the cartridge as possible, it working with silencers was incidental.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It does jack shit. Get a muzzle break for recoil compensation instead if you like having a shitty sight picture.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'll dig up the maths in a few minutes, but no, it does not help. Roughly 10-15% of revolver power is lost through the cylinder gap, meaning that even if you 100% suppress the noise of the muzzle, 10-15% is still coming out the sides and that is a reduction of less than 8dB. That's a huge reduction, but not enough to take 160dB of .357 Magnum down to hearing safe levels (140dB).

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Can't find my old maths, but roughly speaking about 10-15% of a .357 Magnum revolver's energy is lost through the cylinder gap according to:
        >http://www.ballisticsbytheinch.com/gaptests.html
        That means that even if you completely suppress all the sound coming out of the muzzle (not gonna happen) without increasing backpressure (and thus cylinder gap noise, not gonna happen), you will have roughly 10-15% of all noise coming out the cylinder gap.
        Noise, or rather, sound energy, is measured in decibels (dB). They work wierd though: a 3dB reduction means a halving of the sound energy. Let's go with a 12.5% reduction, because that means 1/8 of the energy is left: a half of a half of a half (1/2^3). This means we have 3+3+3 dB of reduction, so 9dB, and let's round that up to 10dB.
        So how much exactly is 10dB? Quite a lot, the difference between conversational speech and a vacuum cleaner, for example. Yet, a .357 Magnum produces about 165 decibels according to
        >https://earinc.com/gunfire-noise-level-reference-chart/
        This means that we end up at about 155dB, give or take a few. Generally speaking, 140dB is considered hearing safe for gunshots, although plenty of people rightfully disagree and think that number should be lower. For reference, 155dB is about the same as shooting a .38 Special or .45 Colt revolver, and you shouldn't be doing that without hearing protection.

        people have all sorts of retarded boomer explanations of how and why they think it works but here's a video of a guy shooting a revolver with a suppressor and the answer seems to be "it reduces the sound measurably but not meaningfully"

        ?t=431

        i have the tactical cowboy and it's pretty much the only threaded barrel revolver i've ever seen, certainly from a factory gun and certainly from a revolver that cheap. it's a question nobody has bothered asking because everyone kind of already knew what the answer was gonna be

        >the answer seems to be "it reduces the sound measurably but not meaningfully"
        Agreed.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I'm one of those who very strongly disagrees with the 140dB thing but still consider that significant. Even at only 10 I'd rather start from 155 then need to add 25-30 NRR on top which can be done with anything vs starting at 165 (before considering magnifiers) and have to double up with good fit to aim for 35.

          Whether that's worth the hassle cans in America represent is certainly debatable. But hearing loss is permanent and cumulative and right now there is no medical tech to make it better, so I think it's worth it. Just wish they were unregulated like they should be and that nobody even had to think about it, you could just go to the store and drop $50-100 for something basic to put on anything you wanted.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Whether that's worth the hassle cans in America represent is certainly debatable.
            For handguns there's also another thing: length and weight. Considering that 6+ inch revolvers are very rare because they're long and cumbersome, a 4 or 6 inch revolver with a decent suppressor is going to be a lot worse, especially considering the small reduction in noise. If you absolutely want to protect your ears, double up: ear plugs with ear muffs.

            https://i.imgur.com/xCXOjGI.jpg

            Here I could see a reasonable use for a suppressed revolver: tunnel fighting. You want the noise suppression, because you will likely be going in without ear protection. Couple that with the lower .38 Special cartridge with it's lower pressure, and you actually get a useful reduction in that you're not deafened inside those all tunnels.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >If you absolutely want to protect your ears, double up: ear plugs with ear muffs.
              This doesn't get you much though, that's my issue. As I said earlier the absolute theoretical max for earpro at ~2k Hz (which is where a lot of gun noise spikes) is 40 dB or so, because that's what your physical skull attenuates. Even with perfect earpro you can't do any better than your skull since further sound just goes through there, so you need someone that totally surrounds your head, a full sound proofing closed helmet like you see aircraft carrier pit guys wear. Doubling or even tripling up doesn't help with this.

              I don't disagree it's a pain in the dick or that extra mass on the end can make things more unwieldy.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                This solution seems to be possible, too. Telescoping cartridge is especially interesting.
                http://www.mythicarmory.com/kac-silenced-revolver-rifle.html

                Fair point on your end, I missed the point about the sound going through the skull - biology isn't my strong suit, that's mostly towards firearms engineering.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It's possible to do a gas sealed revolver setup, that's why Soviets used that ancient Nagant or whatever it was, it wasn't designed for that but turned out to be useful. Somebody could do an updated version, you could still use normal ammo. Just hasn't been demand. Sadly not just for revolvers but handguns in general innovation is kind of sparse, mostly the same clones of ancient stuff get pushed, or new snowflake calibers to try to squeeze out more money for minimal work.

                While different cartridge design is interesting I'm skeptical vs keeping the design in the gun just because complexity in ammo adds up so much faster. On the other hand putting it in the ammo lets people keep using their favorite guns. So thanks for the cool link.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Also the flash suppression and concussion reduction assumably makes a difference for follow up shots in tight dark quarters

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >huge reduction
        >does not help
        ok

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Taking away 10-15% of a supernova's energy is huge considering the energy levels involved, still doesn't really help you if you're anywhere near.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            increase in decibels means exponential increase in energy

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Can't find my old maths, but roughly speaking about 10-15% of a .357 Magnum revolver's energy is lost through the cylinder gap according to:
        >http://www.ballisticsbytheinch.com/gaptests.html
        That means that even if you completely suppress all the sound coming out of the muzzle (not gonna happen) without increasing backpressure (and thus cylinder gap noise, not gonna happen), you will have roughly 10-15% of all noise coming out the cylinder gap.
        Noise, or rather, sound energy, is measured in decibels (dB). They work wierd though: a 3dB reduction means a halving of the sound energy. Let's go with a 12.5% reduction, because that means 1/8 of the energy is left: a half of a half of a half (1/2^3). This means we have 3+3+3 dB of reduction, so 9dB, and let's round that up to 10dB.
        So how much exactly is 10dB? Quite a lot, the difference between conversational speech and a vacuum cleaner, for example. Yet, a .357 Magnum produces about 165 decibels according to
        >https://earinc.com/gunfire-noise-level-reference-chart/
        This means that we end up at about 155dB, give or take a few. Generally speaking, 140dB is considered hearing safe for gunshots, although plenty of people rightfully disagree and think that number should be lower. For reference, 155dB is about the same as shooting a .38 Special or .45 Colt revolver, and you shouldn't be doing that without hearing protection.

        [...]
        >the answer seems to be "it reduces the sound measurably but not meaningfully"
        Agreed.

        Based gun wizard sharing wisdom

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You know what OP? You really wanna know? Drop 140 bucks on it regardless, get a decibel meter off Amazon (30 bucks) and test it yourself.
      Make a YouTube video with it on and off, post it here nd then we will all know. Be better than the retards here and actually test something

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Retard. You can't test milli/microsecond class sound impulses with cheap shit decibel meters.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >can I please get non-retarded answers for my absolutely retarded idea
      How the fuck do troglodytes like you even remember to breath

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They lower the noise but not as good as it would on a non revolver with the same barrel length and caliber.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don’t know the answer anon but it’s an interesting question. Props to you.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Those just cause cylinder chafing make the hammer ring like a tuning fork

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm sure that it will lower the sound, but the back pressure from the suppressor will result in way more gas trying to go out the cylinder gap which will probably make it miserable to shoot. If you've shot a regular semi with a suppressor you know how much dirtier it makes the inside of the gun, same thing is going to happen with a revolver.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I'm sure that it will lower the sound, but the back pressure from the suppressor will result in way more gas trying to go out the cylinder gap
      Bro that kinda sounds dangerous, like "so much pressure shit blows up" dangerous...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >but to a less effective amount than a suppressed pistol?
        That.

        >Sound escapes through the cylinder gap but surely not 100% of the sound.
        Correct. There's videos up on Youtube

        It's not dangerous in the slightest. The highest pressures the gun withstands occur before the bullet leaves the barrel. Anything which happens with the suppressor after the bullet leaves the muzzle is going to be a fraction of the pressure the gun experienced when the bullet was halfway down the barrel.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >your cylinder gap is probably too great for a suppressor to work well, let alone be safe.
        how can a suppressor fuck up your revolver?

        The additional gas from the cylinder gap is only going to be equivalent to the back-pressure caused by the muffler. Practically you're going to be shooting subsonics anyway which will most likely leave you with less blast from the cylinder gap than the average revolver.

        The problem with silencers on revolvers is it's like a muffler on a car with a hole in the exhaust. Sure, it's a little quieter than no muffler and a hole in the exhaust, but you can have the best muffler in the world and your car will still be loud AF.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I have no idea what the fuck is going on in this thread OP. Yes, the right can will lower revolver sound, absolutely. That big blast coming out the front end is producing a significant % of the noise. A can will reduce that. Yeah, it'll definitely be less than a semi. Yes, you will need to pay more attention to can choice. It will not be "hearing safe" (which is 99% industry marketing bullshit, you should wear earpro with most normal suppressed guns too), but it's still hugely helpful since you can beat the earpro limit.

      >I'm sure that it will lower the sound, but the back pressure from the suppressor will result in way more gas trying to go out the cylinder gap
      Bro that kinda sounds dangerous, like "so much pressure shit blows up" dangerous...

      There are ultra low omega can designs guys. Yeah a lot of the most effective 30-50dB ones are high, but even 10-20 dB reduction is still valuable, and a good design can do better while still generating minimal backpressure.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Though yes even an ultra low bp can will probably mean a bit more gas from a revolver. Keep an eye on shrouds or 3D print your own maybe. Or just live with it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why do people like you post? WHY? What's the point in your noguns speculative crap. No a silencer will do little or nothing on a revolver with a cylinder gap.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >IN REVOLVERS 100% OF NOISE COMES OUT OF THE GAP ZERO OUT THE BARREL GUIZ XD
          Holy FUCK are you nocans absolute retards yet quick to spout memes about something you've never touched while then accusing people with suppressed guns of not having guns. This is something you should be able to think about if you're not utterly brain dead even without trying it, though you should. If you think a low-omega can on a revolver will do "nothing" just fucking have a nice day.

          And "little" is retarded too unless you're imagining some hollywood quiet gayry vs seeing them as safety devices that go alongside earpro.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    your cylinder gap is probably too great for a suppressor to work well, let alone be safe. There's a reason why suppressed revolvers are generally a custom job thing, or Nagants.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >your cylinder gap is probably too great for a suppressor to work well, let alone be safe.
      how can a suppressor fuck up your revolver?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Think, anon. Was a revolver designed with that in mind? Why do you not see it done?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Think anon, did gaston glock design the G17 with a threaded barrel, suppressor in mind?
          Suppressors are a retrofit and accessory for 90% of guns, which is why many semi autos require further assistance when sunning suppressors like booster devices (commonly seen on glocks!). There are a scant few that are designed with integral suppressors but most guns are not designed around a suppressor, revolver or not. A suppressor would not fuck up a revolver any more than a semi auto because the point of failure would be the same: the worst thing that can happen is a baffle strike which destroys the suppressor in whatever gun.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    To add to that you would absolutely consider the increase in reliability if your weapon ever jammed when you really need it. Given that is mainly a boomer or tard problem.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There is a company called Revolver Seal you can check out.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Do suppressors on regular revolvers just do not work AT ALL
    Useless. As youa re fully aware the nagant bolt and cylinder lock forward to create a gas seal between the cylinder and barrel so you can use one. The cylinder gap on any regular revolver renders them useless. Also having no/very small cylinder gap brings its own issues. about a 10th of a millimetre is what I like to see a thin cigarette paper should pass through it easily

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Also having no/very small cylinder gap brings its own issues. about a 10th of a millimetre is what I like to see a thin cigarette paper should pass through it easily
      0.10mm (4 thousandths of an inch) is pretty tight for a conventional double action revolver. Most Colts and Smiths should be about 6 thou (0.15mm), which happens to also be the feeler gauge that you get to set a Dan Wesson's barrel. Some single action revolvers (e.g. Freedom Arms) can be tighter, up to about 2 thou (0.05mm) but those can reaisly bind up with heavy shooting.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Checked and thanks fellow revolver lover, that is just my preference when I get a gun set up which I have only had to get done a few times....I've my preference in trigger and crown and a few other things and I just stick with that. I'm not really having to carry much any more thank goodness. I shoot a pair of 5 inch 44 Mag S&W 29s that live in a big loose decent heavy leather blazer, I've had it modified a few times with different panels but right now it has IOTV point blank medium long panels and pockets in it. TBHtbh I have not used it in years, most of the stuff I have been doing has been remote or long range and I just don't have the appetite for fucking around with scumbags that way anymore. I was raised shooting single action BP pistols of all sorts but had that setup because by greatest fear was having to draw a pistol on someone sitting beside me in a car or within arms reach and that setup let me shoot through the coat easily and not have to draw and also had enough in it that it would put them down before I got fucked up

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Doesn't work at all with circumcised ones.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The only revolver I know of that you can suppress is the nagant revolver because the cylinder when cocked is flush with the barrel.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    people have all sorts of retarded boomer explanations of how and why they think it works but here's a video of a guy shooting a revolver with a suppressor and the answer seems to be "it reduces the sound measurably but not meaningfully"

    ?t=431

    i have the tactical cowboy and it's pretty much the only threaded barrel revolver i've ever seen, certainly from a factory gun and certainly from a revolver that cheap. it's a question nobody has bothered asking because everyone kind of already knew what the answer was gonna be

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I guess I disagree with the "meaningfully" bit, because I'm really careful about my hearing, and earpro has an absolute maximum theoretical reduction of about 40dB (which in practice is hard to hit even doubled up). A 44 magnum can easily head up towards 165-170 dB. If you've got a more realistic 30-someodd NRR and are training and shooting a lot, or shooting indoors or near hard walls that reflect noise or anything like that, that adds up significantly.

      Reducing gun noise itself though is perfectly additive with earpro. Even 10-20 dB means you've now got an effective maximum of 50-60 and 40-50 pretty easily. 10-20dB reduction is 10x-100x energy reduction at the ear, it matters a lot in terms of accumulated exposure. I applaud efforts to push it even farther but I wouldn't make "under 140" any special line.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If you're that worried about your hearing you shouldn't be shooting 44 mag period.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >SAA with a suppressor and red dot
      Look how they massacred my boy...

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    cylinder gap is a gnomish myth bro

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
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    Anonymous
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      Anonymous
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        Anonymous
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          Anonymous
          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I want a modernized nagant in .38 wc that can seal the cylinder gap when using .357 brass.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They don't work well. You'll have some moderate effect, but the increased backpressure will mean even more cylinder pop/noise.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    as a nagant revolver owner I have no idea what you mean, suppressor works perfectly

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You can easily put a suppressor on a Nagant M1895 revolver
    >But the police know you fired an 1895 due to uniqueness of the ammo

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