Carpentry Advice

The back of my shed was completely rotted. I decided to repair myself. Nearly all the 2x4s holding the wall up were rotted at the bottom. I cut of the rot, replaced the floor and substructure, but just screwed in pieces of 2x4s to the existing wall studs, then nailed them into the structure at the base. Is this an ok way to do it? The reason it rotted was because i piled up a bunch of old lumber on the outside of that wall and forgot about it. It held moisture up against that side of the shed and rotted everything. Lesson learned

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >that overlap splice
    Not the way I would do it, but whatever.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      some piece of garbage extend the eaves on my roof like this, 50 years later and it looks like garbage and I get to fix it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        50 years later it's still intact but the expert thinks he knows better

        https://i.imgur.com/330qXRa.jpg

        Unnecessarily complicated and not very effective against racking which is a concern with compromised framing.
        Sistering the bottoms is far better, leaves one less joint where slop in the end cuts can allow movement via compression, compression loads are just as they were and because the sister piece spans the joint the parts can't redirect sideways like a Jenga stack, and theres 2x the nailing width through the siding into good stud wood to resist racking. If you want to overkill it, duplicate the side piece on the opposite side.

        >just use twice as much wood

        Might as well shove cinderblocks in there

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          t. hopes to touch a real hammer or saw one day

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's good enough for a shed

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Would have been better to cut them all off evenly and have them supported on a sill. That is then supported from the bottom.

    Brown is old.
    Green is new

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Unnecessarily complicated and not very effective against racking which is a concern with compromised framing.
      Sistering the bottoms is far better, leaves one less joint where slop in the end cuts can allow movement via compression, compression loads are just as they were and because the sister piece spans the joint the parts can't redirect sideways like a Jenga stack, and theres 2x the nailing width through the siding into good stud wood to resist racking. If you want to overkill it, duplicate the side piece on the opposite side.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Racking isn't going to be a problem once it's attached to sheathing.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Adding what amounts to a secondary plate is still totally unnecessary, serves no real purpose while adding more room for gaps and isn't as secure as sistering the damaged members properly.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            na your a real genuine retard, any sort of sheet good wood (get it? fuck you thats funny) add plenty of racking resistance.
            and here is a pickle for the knowing ones 'e add it wherever the hell you want.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is the way. You could do a full sandwich of the splice but for a shed wall I wouldn't bother.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Do what anon's picture shows

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is how you replace a portion of a stud. What OP did relies solely on the shear strength of the fasteners to transfer the roof load to the foundation which is a bad idea.

        https://i.imgur.com/cD1a3i9.png

        Would have been better to cut them all off evenly and have them supported on a sill. That is then supported from the bottom.

        Brown is old.
        Green is new

        Nobody with any experience in framing does this.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Nobody with any experience in framing does this.

          This, even in situations where you might legitimately add a horizontal member like that, those short sections of stud are called what they're called for a reason.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >King stud
            >jack stud
            >cripple
            So much ableism and needless gendering in carpentry, why must it be this way

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              What a sad picture

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is how I fixed my shed. Though only one stud and the sill plate was rotten.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >the eternal boomer strikes again.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's cutting corners in a weird way, but it'll be fine unless you go bigger than a shed

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Would not do it like this out of principle since this is bit shoddy/cutting corners. You cut them in same length, add missing peace and put peace of wood both sides that lap over the joint considerably so weight comes down from the roof straight down to foundations and those side peaces keep the ones on the middle moving side to side. Alternatively construction presented by >2482025 is good option, just need to consider witch uses less lumber and what you have on hand already to keep cost down. On shed like this its not AS important, but as trades man i would not personally even allow anyone do it like this, but do it my self properly as a favor. Too many shoddy builders and handy men out there, giving us bad rep.

      And there is no snow or wind loads needed to take into consideration, witch is dependent on climate and location. Personally i like to add 20% to anything i'm building as reserve top of max snow loads around here, so if i say decide put in hoist during winter, or go on top to drop snow, lift materials on top, it can handle that with out need to consider and also helps if repairs are done later down the line and not properly, like in OP's case that cuts the carrying capacity somewhat.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's not a deck.. it's a shed, it'll have plywood sheathing holding everything together

        Only thing he should have done for it to be better is to use screws/a single bolt

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    oh my god you guys stop fucking larping, you're going to kill someone with that shit show

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's a shed, the entire thing could literally collapse and it would be a minor annoyance.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not if you're in it when it happens.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          this anon is right, you know
          my gay uncle died in a tragic shed collapse

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I personally would have lapped the joints further above the cut as well as adding a proper length block under each cut stud.

    I actually did a repair similar to this on a 20x30 shed at my folks house. Bottom sill and the studs were rotten up about a foot. Cut them all off even above the rot and added an angle iron support to each stud to the concrete footer. Did them one at a time while supporting each rafter with a jack. When i got done i put up a form board on the inside and poured a stem wall up to the bottom of the boards. Was able to do all this without disturbing the stucco on the outside of the wall.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Holy crap, a footer, angle iron, and stem wall for a fucking shed.
      At that point you might as well just go all the way and build the thing out of reinforced concrete.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    when you dont know what you are doing, might as well go overkill.... there is no reason not to have a full second stud next to each half stud..

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You should've bought a bunch of these to join the 2x4s.

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