car ports, covered parking areas, sheds with no walls etc

I want one I can put like 4 to 8 cars underneath, mebbe some haybales (or more).
Whats the best way most inexpensive to get them. They need to look good but I dont want to spend a fortune. I dont mind doing some of the work. Any tips. maybe talk to some amish or local farmers.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Study different options including posts and truss style.

    If you're willing to hunt materials surplus steel can save you a shitload of money then buy the roofing new surplus. Fecesbook Marketplace is a pretty good source as are liquidation auctions.

    Heavy steel uprights and trusses are always a win. You can run a horizontal beam down each side of the carport then weld or bolt the uprights to that and not need to pot the posts in concrete. You can run a beam down each side with two or even one potted verticals in the ground (level the beam with the in-ground vertical attached in its hole, then pot with concrete) and there's your foundation. (My steel building's foundation is a 20-foot steel beam square, no concrete form needed.)

    Learn about steel and ironwork even if you use lighter material. This stuff is golden to know and if you wrench or want to your frame can also be a gantry or hold an I-beam for a trolley hoist. Plan for MORE than you currently want and plan for expandability.

    The design in your photo is excellent. Demolition companies drop lots of structure so visit some in person if they advertise surplus steel (common on Fecesbook).

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    if you see a high tunnel that has no more plastic, the farmer may not want it and that's why he hasn't replaced the plastic. if you do the labor with a team it's possible to take it down in a day.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    thanks for the good ideas

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    does it need anchor for high wind

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pole barn with roof trusses 8’ oc. 2 trusses per post. Dropped beam around perimeter for bearing under trusses. Dropped purlins hangered 2’oc along top chords of trusses. Metal roof.. this is your path anon

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      8 ft. On center ?
      I think you mean 4ft. Fenwick…sheez ppl

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If I were you I would seriously consider enclosing it on 3 sides at least. I have been around the completely open haysheds and they really provide no protection unless the rain is falling straight down. Hell even on my haysheds with 3 sides enclosed you still get plenty of snow and rain blowing in during the storm and dust and birds at other times. Perfect for hay and short term parking or storing equipment out of the sun. Not ideal for long term storage of vehicles.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    2 buddies and a wrench is all it takes to put this up.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No, one buddy and at least two wrenches but the outside one better be a corded, cordless or (ugh, I did mine with one long ago) an air ratchet. Inside nuts are easy to do by hose clamping visegrips to a green steel fence post (the shape holds them in place, clamps prevent rotation) then clamping your nut in the visegrip.

      Fence post makes reaching the bolts easy while outside guy blips the ratchet until engaged then runs the fastener down several threads. When the other regional fasteners are installed and taper bars position holes not due immediate bolting, tighten the rest fully.

      You need taper bars to align the bolt holes, anti-seize for the threads (I disassembled mine to move to my next base then rebuilt it only having to cut a few fasteners because anti-seize is love), scaffold or a bus or truck to drive beneath and your choice of winches, snatch blocks and pullers.

      They're not bad to disassemble if you can score one used.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      intredasting

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I built a two-story car port. It's tricky driving a car up and down narrow stairs, but my car enjoys the view up there.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're dammed expensive and the protection you get is relative. Waste of steel if your ask me.
    Companies will send a kit and fixers and have it up in two days, do it yourself and it would take a month.

    Problem here is mostly how high wind tends to frick what is essentially a metal sail. Put one up yourself, you who ain't a steel fixer and you might just find out.

    Most people just build these as lean-tos on an existing structure. Half the posts, protected from wind, better protection.
    Free standing is more for fire risk so yes...hay bales.

    But are hay bales even worth a shed?
    Hill Billy wisdom is just to wrap your bales for a season, stack them properly and if you lose some so what.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You cant build it cheaper than buying one from one of those metal carport places you see driving along the highway. If you are recycling old material or building a lean to then maybe it would be cheaper to build it yourself.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on your ability to haul and what's in your area too. Some areas have affordable trusses including steel poultry barn trusses and uprights cheap used and they're easily durable enough to reuse so they're popular. If the roof and sides aren't critical color-wise surplus panels can be had too, or score the framework surplus and buy the panels.

      It's situational and the more time you have within reason the better deals you can score.

      They're dammed expensive and the protection you get is relative. Waste of steel if your ask me.
      Companies will send a kit and fixers and have it up in two days, do it yourself and it would take a month.

      Problem here is mostly how high wind tends to frick what is essentially a metal sail. Put one up yourself, you who ain't a steel fixer and you might just find out.

      Most people just build these as lean-tos on an existing structure. Half the posts, protected from wind, better protection.
      Free standing is more for fire risk so yes...hay bales.

      But are hay bales even worth a shed?
      Hill Billy wisdom is just to wrap your bales for a season, stack them properly and if you lose some so what.

      >But are hay bales even worth a shed?
      >Hill Billy wisdom is just to wrap your bales for a season, stack them properly and if you lose some so what.

      Generally this and most are left outdoors unless the owner has specific need for backup storage.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >>But are hay bales even worth a shed?
        >>Hill Billy wisdom is just to wrap your bales for a season, stack them properly and if you lose some so what.
        >Generally this and most are left outdoors unless the owner has specific need for backup storage.

        Tarps suck ass for hay. The bales really do need to breathe and a shed does a hell of a lot better job of that. Plus a tarp will get a hole in it and actually funnel water right to that spot and make it worse right there. And every bottom bale will soak up moisture.

        In a hay shed if you get it put up right every single bale will be good still except maybe the front bottom bale if it is a stack that goes all the way to the front edge of the shed and the back bottom bale that will wick moisture up from under the back of the shed.

        It is a significant amount of hay that you can save with a proper shed.

        T. hay farmer

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Menards versatile frames

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Versatube** frames from Menards

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    what do you think of plastic sheds?

    plus what about big box store covered parking areas, kinda short for tractors tbh

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