Can't they use this prince rupert drop principle to create armor?

This thing is super strong on the big round part due to the internal pressure, but at the same time it is weak on the tail.
The strongest part is bullet proof.

Using the same principle.
Replace glass with steel.
And instead of a drop, make it a perfect sphere.

Wouldn't it be like the perfect armor?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cost.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    KYS underage moron.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes Anon, you've invented bulletproof glass and tempered metal.
    You can buy them in sheets and tile them to create your battlesphere. Godspeed.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      do they pay royalties to OP ?

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >what is gorilla glass
    >what is ion tempering

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Steel is crystalline, so it won't work like glass. There are glassy metals (called metallic glasses, but they should be called glassy metals) but they are difficult to make and I don't know if an analog to a Prince Rupert's Drop can be done.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Prince Rupert's Drops and metallic glasses are both created by very fast quench rates. The metallic glasses you see today are basically the current technical and economic limits of that process. Probably there'll be better products some day but for now that's where we're at.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Prince Rupert's Drops are created by dropping molten glass into a bucket of water lmao. SO unless you're going to pretend that water quenching is uncommonly fast, no.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What you're saying doesn't seem well constructed enough to reply to. It's unclear what your arguement is.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >This thing is super strong on the big round part
      Well, you can give it a good whack with a hammer without it breaking. But as far as the shit modern armor has to deal with getting whacked with a hammer is pretty damn trivial. And you can give a ball of steel a pretty darn good whack with a hammer too without breaking it.
      Now, what does the "rupertisation" really do to the glass? It doesn't make it any harder, instead it makes it tougher. Since glass is normally quite hard but very brittle, the end result is a pretty resilient material. Steel however is hard and not very brittle to start with, so there isn't so much to gain here. Also the "rupertisation" happens due to rapid cooling of the surface of the glass creating a very large temperature difference between the surface and the core of the blob. Steel conducts heat much better than glass, and so it'd be relatively hard to get that big of a temperature difference.
      There's also the regular way of hardening steel (which works on entirely different principles form the Prince Rupert's drop, for one thing it actually increases hardness). Which all said and done works really well, so you can get a very strong and quite tough material that way instead. And that IS what a lot of armour is and has been made of, AR500 being one modern example.

      The amorphous nature of glass is not at all necessary for the Prince Rupert's effect.

      Prince Rupert's Drops and metallic glasses are both created by very fast quench rates. The metallic glasses you see today are basically the current technical and economic limits of that process. Probably there'll be better products some day but for now that's where we're at.

      True, but they're also very different and effectively unrelated things so that's all irrelevant here.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Steel conducts heat much better than glass, and so it'd be relatively hard to get that big of a temperature difference.
        It was no problem to do. Was called face hardened armor and was common WW1 and prior. Replaced by RHA.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You're looking at two different effects. In a Prince Rupert's drop extreme differences in temperature while the core is still molten results in large residual stress that toughens the item. With hardening of steel you use sufficiently rapid cooling to trap carbon atoms in a place they normally don't want to be, resulting in a different and harder crystalline structure. Note hardness vs toughness, different words because they are different properties. Hardening steel often reduces toughness, and the reason they face hardened instead of through hardening was to keep the back side of the plate unhardened and tough. While rapid cooling can be involved in both cases, we don't need the same temperature gradient for face hardening as for a strong Rupert effect, we can even achieve it with a chemical composition difference instead and no temperature difference at all if we want.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The amorphous nature is absolutely necessary. If it was a crystalline solid, the thermal residual stresses would relieve via dislocations. It’s not, so it can’t.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          wel duh thats obvious

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You can have residual stress in crystalline materials too you know. Dislocations (and other stacking faults) can appear and shift around to turn stress into deformation, but it's far from an effortless and perfect mechanism for it (and metals would all be basically without strength entirely if it was). Now perhaps it's easier to retain stress in a glass... but that wasn't what you said.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Okay, show me an example of a Prince Rupert's droplet using a crystalline solid.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They use this effect for FAP.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      there is also a pointy version

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Replace glass with steel.
    The principle doesn't work anymore.

    >And instead of a drop, make it a perfect sphere.
    So make it worse? Why?

    >Wouldn't it be like the perfect armor?
    No, it wouldn't work at all. And if it did, it would be much larger than you, making it impossible to move around in.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      't it be like the perfect armor?
      >No, it wouldn't work at all. And if it did, it would be much larger than you, making it impossible to move around in
      ???
      I'm talking about making small spheres that you would cover the exterior of a tank with it.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    seems like people do not understand the reason why a rupert's drop is so strong in compression

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Replace glass with steel.
    This is how heat treated steel works.
    >And instead of a drop, make it a perfect sphere.
    Shots end up passing between the spheres. You could try one big sphere but there'd be no place for the wearer.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you need to be 18 or older to post here

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you remind me of a moron that asked why a submarine couldn't work in space

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      just use a rocket instead of a propeller

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >vorpal blade posting intensifies

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just use diamonds, its the strongest metal

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I put it in my dick and it shatterd

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    We use this principle all the time, for example steel reinforced concrete where the steel compresses the concrete, or composite armor where outer layers resist compression and inner layers resist tension.

    The problem is this is difficult to accomplish at the molecular level unless nature allows it via simple processes, like Rupert's drop. If 3d printing could be achieved at the nano scale and nerds and maybe AI were to experiment with it, that might yield some interesting results.

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Computer!

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