Building my own LED strip

So i want to make my own LED strip to go into my Lego sets, but i don't have a fitting power supply, i need 2V DC, thought maybe i can reuse one of my old Power Supplys from a classic LED strip but they dont give me the right voltage (id rather not 'waste' energy by putting in resistors). Any Ideas?

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >Any Ideas?
    yes

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Fk off

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        typical

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    if you are using more than one led put them in series
    if you don't want to put them in series or use current limit resistor then you might investigate led driver/current driver/voltage switcher circuits.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >reuse one of my old Power Supplys
      you can measure this using a $10 multimeter

      you can put them in series to increase the voltage requirement. as suggested.

      Ignore these gays

      >Any Ideas?
      yes

      I know this is PrepHole but come on OP. This would be a cool project if it were 2005. We're almost 20 years later now, a lot of the cool DIY electronics problems that people posted online tutorials for are now solved. Spend your time doing something more worthwhile.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        It's a matter of practicality and skill/knowledge. This is a basic problem to solve: Anon wants to light up lego sets with a custom LED strip. Anon says he needs 2V DC, has an existing supply that doesn't provide the right voltage, and that he'd rather not 'waste' energy by putting in resistors.. That gives an rough indication of his knowledge level. Further, this post would be better made in /ohm/.

        OP you need to decide if you're driving your LEDs by constant voltage or constant current. Constant voltage is going to be easier, and you can get wall wart supplies cheaply enough, in which case you will need current limiting resistors. I'm assuming your 2V requirement is coming from the forward voltage of your LEDs. If you don't include a current limiting resistor and try to drive your LEDs at 2V, any variation in the supply above its forward voltage will lead to a very fast increase in current and potentially fry your LEDs.
        If it's constant current, you need to make or purchase a supply that fits your needs based on the LED strip you put together.
        You're also missing information about the LEDs you intend to use as well; are you using something premade or making it yourself? Do you need a specific shape or density of LEDs that isn't met by existing LED strips on the market? If not premade, how do you intend to produce the LED strips?

        Like I said, this would be interesting to see if it were 20 years ago, but the pragmatist will say 'just get an existing LED strip that fits your needs and can be trimmed to size and move on'. Attached is an image of a matrix I did a long time ago. There's no point in doing something like that now, as matrix modules are available cheaply and in many different sizes/colors.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          thank you helpful boomer for spoonfeeding the moron
          now we know how smart you are and, by extension, how smart we are not.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Point being is: this is a solved problem, it's been a solved problem for years, fricking google it

            Thay's an LED array, not a strip

            No shit

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Thay's an LED array, not a strip

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I have a feeling that you don't have a good justification for why you're doing any of this. Put leds in series, use a current limiting driver.

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I know this is PrepHole but come on OP. This would be a cool project if it were 2005. We're almost 20 years later now, a lot of the cool DIY electronics problems that people posted online tutorials for are now solved. Spend your time doing something more worthwhile.

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >So i want to make my own LED strip to go into my Lego sets
    Grow the frick up

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    You have to use SMD components if you want any sort of flexibility.
    >i need 2V DC, thought maybe i can reuse one of my old Power Supplys from a classic LED strip but they dont give me the right voltage
    Connect the LEDs in series until you get close to the right voltage then fill in the rest with a current limiting resistor.
    >(id rather not 'waste' energy by putting in resistors).
    Unless you are using high power LED or an extensive LED system (many, many parallel lines with hundreds of LEDs each), designing a current source is usually not worth it (transistors are not free you know).

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