Armored Humanoid Drones?

A few days ago there was a discussion about the feasibility of using power armor in warfare, but one thing that struck me is when someone brought up the possibility of just using an armored humanoid robot instead of a human operator inside. Then others pointed out that an AI wouldn't probably be able to handle complex situations, at least not in the near future, which is true, but what about if it's a drone? You remote control it with some kind of device similar to 3D gaming.

Otherwise, maybe we should just opt for tiny drones that can eliminate or disable threats instead of some big heavy robots.

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A UGV is kind of like this, but a humanoid model would have more flexibility with tool and vehicle usage. Fun related note: Boston Dynamics, along with other robotics companies, are trying to not have their equipment weaponized.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Fun related note: Boston Dynamics, along with other robotics companies, are trying to not have their equipment weaponized.
      That's just CYA. They're fantasizing about murders droids just like the rest of us.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I remember Alphabet getting scared of the negative press around robots, getting called "Skynet" and such.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Still limited by battery capacity lithium is the best element for batterys and its still dog ass
    This would rely on a wireless or wired connection that can be cut hijacked or jammed . Said connection could also reveal the position of the operator , further out latancy can be an issue

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Subject to the same issues that remote UGVs bring in general. You have all your eggs in the control team basket, which is now emitting a lot more signals to trace than a regular infantry squad. That's also not going to get into the workload issues or the longevity issues. A UGV control crew will be even more task-stressed having to 1) manage their vehicles, 2) keep to their own safety, 3) maintain/fix unexpected breakdowns/problems. In terms of longevity - Infantry can hold a position on a backpack full of rations - it will suck for them, but a backpack full of batteries doesn't last nearly as long.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Robot that requires a wifi connection to operate
    >OP doesn't know about jammer tech

    Well'p back to the drawing board...

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Jamming isn't like television. Using it paints a giant bullseye on yourself saying I am here, bomb me.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        it's not the 1960s anymore, anon

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          What the fuck are you hinting at? He's completely right. Jamming inevitably means you have to send out a stronger signal than whatever you're trying to jam to drown it out in noise. There is physically no other way.
          You can convince yourself of the physical priciples behind it by using a beamer to project an image on a screen and then trying to obfuscate this image by shining a flashlight on it. That's what jamming is in a nutshell.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bipedal machinery is miles off being useful, especially on the battlefield. Current tech is somewhere around 'struggles to open doors', and needs to be tethered to its power supply.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Are they gonna release him?

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why the need for a humanoid shape? A gun mounted on tank treads and a camara to see thru is all you need for an assault bot. The fuck do you need arms and finders for? To flip off the enemy? No to mention the legs and the whole balanced walking dilemma.
    Engineering is best when you focus on solving a straightforward problem. In military context that means 1. find enemy, 2. shoot enemy. You don't want to serve him fucking tea, so anything besides a gun, optics and a way of moving around is just needlessly adding to complexity, cost and modes of failure.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Opening a door, operating a vehicle, retrieving objects...
      All gun on track designs so far have proven to be lackluster specifically because of how easily they're thwarted by something as simple as stairs.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        There are precious few strairs to climb in the vast open fields of Kherson and Kharkiv right now. Field combat and urban combat are vastly different things. You shouldn't be wanting to have the same design excel in both things. Just like the M1A1 Abrams can't climb any strairs or hide in a cellar, it's still a massively useful weapon for what it does.
        For urban combat it might be best to have soldiers bring FPV drones with grenades strapped to them. No ground bound robot could compete with the mobility of that. Don't use doors, fly in through the broken windows!

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >AHHHHH ROBOT JESUS, SAVE MEEEE

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      How do they make the internals so durable? I'm pretty sure my computer would die just from falling over, let alone jumping head first into a metal table.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        thats because most computers are kept together via a 1mm thick metal casing and parts plugged together like lego or via cables and maybe some small ass screws

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It's all solid state.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        bro, you can just cushion PCB boards in foam pad ez pz. Never opened a electronic device and seen the foam pads they use everywhere?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you mean RNGesus

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have been fantasizing about this for several years now since all the technology pieces are finally starting to fall in place:

    1) Boston Dynamics-type Spot/Atlas/Regular flying drones "killbots" with high degree of AI autonomy - don't tell the robot how to move, just tell it where to go, it can figure it out
    2) Starlink satellite mesh with laser communication for millisecond-tier feedback from thousands of miles away so operators can sit in a safe and comfy air-conditioned trailer somewhere.
    3) VR-enabled killbots: soldier can assume direct control and get feedback almost instantaneously, but is just in another trailer far away.
    4) Spaceship suborbital deployment capacity: "a squadron of killbots on your location in 30 minutes or your pizza is free."

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