are there still POWs in Nam?

are there still POWs in Nam?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    American POWs were forced to have sex with female VC Guerillas to breed another generation of POWs

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do they still capture GIs?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What a trajedy. How can Americans leave those men behind like this?

      How horrible. Imagine the brown, sweaty, thin petite Vietnamese women craving the BWC every single day. How terrifying.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      5' vietnamese pussy has got to be so good

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      giwtwm

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're called expats now, they suffer from cheap housing and cheap women.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What a trajedy. How can Americans leave those men behind like this?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >trajedy
        ESL

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No, south east asia is just a haven for boomers and poor Americans that want to feel rich.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Lost inside some tight Viet clunge maybe

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    lmao are you burgers still flying this flag at government buildings or w/e? Actually some of the most unhinged shit I've seen in a while.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's bonkers

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        fricking hell. Bring our boys home!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >be zoomer
      I've always understood this as a remembrance thing. Nobody associates the flag with ongoing investigations. Very occasionally, vets from both sides manage to link up and do a body recovery or identify a mass grave. Sometimes they get answers about what happened to their buddies.

      In small towns, a POW-MIA flag out front is also just kind of a generic signifier that you're at a fraternal lodge or municipal building.

      Americans are far more invested in body recovery than other cultures, even other anglos. It's a source of friction on multinational deployments because the burgers will want to knowingly risk more lives to recover a guy who fell in the field, and everyone else will think this is unjustifiable. Non-US gwot guys mention it a lot.

      Contact magic still has its role in the states. It's probably a thing overall.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This. It's like a black arm band for funerals. Nothing more but a remembrance symbol. Anyone saying it is for a conspiracy fell for the conspiracy.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Finally someone with common sense. It's a memorial symbol, just like the Tomb of The Unknown Soldier. It has long since transcended it's Vietnam-specific origins.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        American bodies are simply worth more. Fun fact: our diets act something as a natural embalming fluid, which often means instead of rotting we mummify.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Are you a McDonald's?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >American bodies are simply worth more.
          priced by the lb. they sure are

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        probably a *good thing overall

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I look forward to the day my country stops defending yours

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I look forward to the day my country stops defending yours
        I too want to see the balt-shit states ripped to shreds for their constant blood-thirsty yapping

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's to represent Ukrainain POWs now that their country is an official US vassal state

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >It's to represent ukrainain POWs now that their country is an official US vassal state

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        100% of Ukrainians would rather be a USA vassal state than anything to Russia.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Projecting much are we Ivan?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >everybody is a master and slave!!1!
        this is why nobody likes you or wants to be associated with you

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I've been telling people for years that it's schizo boomer moronation. Anyone who flies it should be made fun of

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Entire POW-MIA thing is just sad, a way to turn thr grief over the death of relatives into supposedly-fixable issue and anger. What possible reasons would the Vietnamese have to keep some random grunts imprisoned for decades instead of just either releasing them when the war ended or straight up killing them?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >A number of individuals were not satisfied with or did not trust U.S. government actions in this area and took their own initiative. Retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Jack E. Bailey created Operation Rescue, which featured a former freighter and smuggling boat named the S.S. Akuna and solicited funds from POW/MIA groups.[24][25] While Bailey did pick up some Vietnamese refugees, [24] he never produced any prisoners and the boat spent years never leaving its dock in Songkhla in Thailand.[25] The effort did, however, prove adept at bringing in money through the Virginia-based Eberle Associates direct mail marketing firm.[25][24] Financial reports indicated that Operation Rescue spent 89 percent of the funds it raised on further fundraising.[25]

    >During the 1980's, former United States Army Special Forces member Bo Gritz undertook a series of private trips into Southeast Asia, purportedly to locate U.S. POW's whom some believed were still being held by Laos and Vietnam, for example at location Nhommarath. These missions were heavily publicized and controversial – for instance, as some commentators stated, few successful secret missions involve bringing to the border towns females openly marketing commemorative POW-rescue T-shirts.[26][27]

    Wild.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I know the term gets overused a bit but past a point it's got to be a grift. Convince a bunch of people who can't accept that their MIA relative is never coming home to give you money.

      Entire POW-MIA thing is just sad, a way to turn thr grief over the death of relatives into supposedly-fixable issue and anger. What possible reasons would the Vietnamese have to keep some random grunts imprisoned for decades instead of just either releasing them when the war ended or straight up killing them?

      I think it requires buying into a certain level of underlying cartoon villainy. It was a fricked up war waged in fricked up ways and the North did some bad things post unification too, but as far as the western forces present were concerned? They just wanted us out of there. We were the ones making it our business, they didn't particularly have it in for US or Australia or whoever else.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I think it requires buying into a certain level of underlying cartoon villainy.
        If the Ukraine war has shown us anything, it's that enemies of America are indeed capable and quite frequently engage in cartoon villainy.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, but these guys aren't exactly Russian. Shit, they're actually buddied up with the Americans nowadays because they consider that war to be a hiccup compared to The Book Of Grudges that is their relationship with China.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Nah, only russians do that. Even the vietcong weren't that evil.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I know the term gets overused a bit but past a point it's got to be a grift. Convince a bunch of people who can't accept that their MIA relative is never coming home to give you money.
      [...]
      I think it requires buying into a certain level of underlying cartoon villainy. It was a fricked up war waged in fricked up ways and the North did some bad things post unification too, but as far as the western forces present were concerned? They just wanted us out of there. We were the ones making it our business, they didn't particularly have it in for US or Australia or whoever else.

      >I know the term gets overused a bit but past a point it's got to be a grift. Convince a bunch of people who can't accept that their MIA relative is never coming home to give you money.
      It happened a decent amount back then. Sometimes the missions were in good faith but founded on bad info from locals telling sketchy expats they saw Jesus Christ in a hostile camp just over the border in Cambodia

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Time to drop PrepHole-approved Youtube-core

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Three Marines were left in Khmer Rouge hands during the Mayaguez incident, but they didn't live very long. All were murdered within days of capture.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Their death was brutal. Beaten to death with rocket tubes. Frick commies

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I mean the I have a hard time seeing a F-16 deal happening with a country that has american POWs?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    War ended in 1975, so the youngest possible POW would be 67 years old. Not a chance they'd be alive as regular prisoners.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >itt a bunch of browns befuddled by caring about others
    The flag isn't a current demand to bring some supposed POWs back, it's become more of a remembrance item

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This…

      Poors across the world just can’t fathom that America never stops looking for our MIA. I have a friend in Laos right now doing exactly this for the army.

      I went deep down this rabbit hole about a year ago. I think it’s possible some were left behind during Operation Homecoming, or got shipped off to the Soviets, but I think it’s highly unlikely they were dead by the end of the 70’s. There would be literally zero reason to keep a prisoner that long, and the implications of what it would mean if it was discovered would be huge.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        To clarify, I meant highly unlikely they are still alive, and would have been dead by the end of the 70’s.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Well yeah, they had no real rational reason to keep some random grunts in camp for years just for the hell of it, and if they had some high-value officer prisoners to squeeze info out of, keeping them would also become a liability after they had squeezed all info out of them, so it’s safe to assume that regular Joes were released at the end of the war and special prisoners were killed as loose ends. I have no problem saying that Vietnamese were cruel towards POWs, but even they would see no point in keeping prisoners just for the sake of tormenting them at the point when they have no more value and/or are a huge political risk if their status became public knowledge.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The Soviets did that to German WWII POWs though. Many were only released in the 1980s.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The last German POWs in Soviet hands were released in the 1950s.

            You might be conflating that with the one Hungarian guy who was in an insane asylum for 40 years because they thought he was legitimately crazy.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              WW2 was also a pretty exceptional case in terms of post-war POW processing. Even putting aside the awful Soviet treatment of POWs, there was an obscene number of them and barely even a coherent state for them to be released back to.
              The USSR also needed them for labour post-war after losing so many men to the fighting, which gummed things up further.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >awful Soviet treatment of POWs
                Considering the awful condition of awful german treatment of soviet POWs, they should be glad they weren't slaughtered on sight

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, but they're all bones now.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Frick around
    >Find out
    >"NOOO BRING OUR BOYS HOME THEY DINDU NUTHIN'!"

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    relative was nam pow. bagged over Doc Noi rail yard on an A6 strike in 67. 5 years in hoa lo prison. the nam pow folks scoffed at this bullshit.

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