Are silnylon tarps a marketing scam, when plastic exists?

>silnylon tarp
>only 330 grams (11.6 oz)
>will break when exposed to fire or if a branch will fall on it
>expensive to fix or replace
>looks nice
>120 USD

Meanwhile:
>literal piece of plastic drop cloth
>only 330 grams (11.6 oz) for a decent thickness
>will break when exposed to fire or if a branch will fall on it
>easy to fix with ducktape and trivial to replace
>looks like an oversized garbage bag
>2 USD

Why would anyone sane buy a silnylon tarp, PrepHole?
No, I mean it seriously. Why shouldn't I make myself a tarp out of this plastic drop cloth? Is there any benefit (other than looks) that would justify buying a product that's sixty times more expensive?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You forget the sound of plastic "crunching" in the wind. That itself is also very irritating. Also silnylon is more easily packable. Otherwise, I guess it's up to you and your specific flavour of autism.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >the sound of plastic "crunching" in the wind
      soul

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    People have been screwing around with polycro sheets as tarps for a very long time with varying degrees of success.

    >if a branch falls on them, both will be destroyed
    Not every branch weighs a hundred pounds. The plastic sheets are just much weaker. Wind is a bigger issue. Also, a small rip in a nylon tarp won’t always turn into a catastrophe; hence “rip stop” nylon. A small tear in plastic generally will. There’s also the issue of tie offs for guylines. It introduces a pretty big failure point to plastic.

    >a nylon tarp cant be fixed with duct tape but a plastic sheet can
    wut?

    But yeah, you can absolutely get away with plastic if it’s not too windy and you don’t have bad luck. Go out enough times and it’s more likely to fail.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >>a nylon tarp cant be fixed with duct tape but a plastic sheet can
      >wut?
      Maybe it's just my cheap, chinease duct tape, but it doesn't stick well to silnylon, while working great with plastic

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    because i don't wanna look like a homeless, next question?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do you often encounter other people when camping?
      I'm not sure why looks matter if you don't

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It can be done quite aesthetically, but I'll admit it's an acquired taste: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2tZLJ3bD1E

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Make yourself a backpack out of an ikea bag to complete your ultralighter hobo look (only 380g!)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      that is such a flex though, you don't even need a tent because of all the hunnies who will be cuddling up to you with that bag.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm married, I would enjoy the b***h repellant effect. 380 grams is based too.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How do you attach the tieouts?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      With duck tape, it's really as simple as that.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's gonna fall apart in the first proper rainstorm.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          wrong

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            How many storms have you weathered under your trash bag tarp?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I camped like that in some really windy conditions, under snow and under regular rain, but not during any powerful storms, when there's a high risk of branches falling down from the trees - I'm a hammock camper and that would be too dangerous for my liking.
              If you're really worried, you could take a pinch of dirt, wrap your tarp around it to form a small ball and use that as a tieout, pic related. It should be even sturdier than duck tape adhesive (which again, in 95% of conditions is just fine). I'd still use ducktape though to reinforce material in that place.

              If the wind is really strong, you could just make more tieouts, to distribute the force of the wind evenly.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                How many garbage bags did it take? How did you connect the bags to one another? Tape? Melt them? Duct tape eventually fails when exposed to water.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I didn't use a literal garbage bag you bozo. I used plastic drop cloth, like the one OP showed on the right. They come in really big sizes; the one I used was 4x6 meters and I had to cut it down to size. It's also much thicker than a literal trash bag.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Duct tape eventually fails when exposed to water.
                Maybe. Didn't happen to me so far. If I was worried, then in case of any tears I'd put duck tape on both sides of the tarp - this way the bottom piece of tape wouldn't be exposed to water at all and give majority of strength, while the top one, more exposed to water, would have to just provide rain protection.

                Besides, given how cheap this whole thing is, I wouldn't mind replacing it every other season or so. I think everyone should at least consider this kind of tarp. Especially if you're not gonna meet other campers - it does look like a garbage bag shelter that a homeless person would use.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If you take a trash bag and cut it open by slicing it down one of the sides, then cut it across bottom, you can turn it into a single layered big rectangular sheet of plastic. 2 or 3 of these sheets should be enough to fit a person laying down under it, but it could take more depending on the size of your trashbag and the desired size of the finished tarp.

                As for melting them together, sure you can do this. Just overlap the edges of the two sheets of plastic and apply a little heat as you press them together. You can use a bunch of different heat sources to do this too. Like a clothes iron, flat iron, soldering iron, heat gun, or maybe even a hair dryer. You may need to fold a few pieces of paper over and place it on top of the plastic to insulate it from the heat source bit, so you can heat it slowly and evenly.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                How many garbage bags did it take? How did you connect the bags to one another? Tape? Melt them? Duct tape eventually fails when exposed to water.

                if you want tape that will last forever on plastic use steam seal tape, its not that much expensive either

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                will check it out, thx!

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                np anon give it a try
                it will never tear or dry out like duct tape

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                theoretically, how would installing grommets onto this material end up? would it compromise the integrity of the material?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                if there is enough pull on them even the best commercial ones will eventually fail
                many people making their own tarps usually stitch patches of leather or something stronger to the edges to take some of that weight off from the grommets
                this

                https://i.imgur.com/Yg7tjqK.jpeg

                I camped like that in some really windy conditions, under snow and under regular rain, but not during any powerful storms, when there's a high risk of branches falling down from the trees - I'm a hammock camper and that would be too dangerous for my liking.
                If you're really worried, you could take a pinch of dirt, wrap your tarp around it to form a small ball and use that as a tieout, pic related. It should be even sturdier than duck tape adhesive (which again, in 95% of conditions is just fine). I'd still use ducktape though to reinforce material in that place.

                If the wind is really strong, you could just make more tieouts, to distribute the force of the wind evenly.

                is the easiest way to do it and you should learn it anyways if for some reason your tarp would end up ripping

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Just scrunch the corner of the tarp up and use it like a piece of rope to tie a sheet bend in it. There are some even more secure knots you can tie too, but this one's quick to tie and easy to learn. You may even already know it.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just use blue tarps from harbor freight.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Based,
      Same here, kept me dry and cozy no problem

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >bringing a chair
        >when you have a hammock to sit in
        why

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not him but
          >bug net
          if it’s really bad you don’t want to be opening and closing that thing every time you get up/down, it will let the bugs inside.
          Also
          >lantern
          he’s obv car camping so why not bring a few extra comfort items

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I take an old railroad lantern for off-trail camping. Shit's maximum cozy.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yup! Car camping but it’s a mile and a half hike to the spot.

            I’ve roughed it with lighter gear but if I can take the chance I’d rather carry something heavier and more comfortable

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    An 8 by 11 tarp will last you twice as long imo. The extra weight is manageable if you’re only carrying a tarp.
    Pros:
    >can be used as a rainfly when using a hammock
    >can be used as a ground sheep to protect your sleeping pad
    >can be used to haul shit
    >can be easily incorporated into shelters like a leanto or frick it, can be a standalone leanto
    >will last years with no loss of waterproofing
    >durable so heavy rain/snow won’t break it.

    Cons:
    >heavy
    >makes noise if super windy

    Just buy an 85L pack and stuff it in the bottom. It won’t make that much of a difference if you’re not carrying a bunch of heavy shit or going 10+ miles a day

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