Anyone else want to live and travel the world on a WW2 destroyer? I imagine it must be comfy.

Anyone else want to live and travel the world on a WW2 destroyer? I imagine it must be comfy.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Also what WW2 destroyer would you want to live on?

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Having toured the USS Turner Joy which is larger, more modern, and likely more comfortable than any WW2 destroyer, no. That sounds like a terrible time. If I wanted to tour the world in a destroyer sized ship I'd want to do it on a yacht.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >If I wanted to tour the world in a destroyer sized ship I'd want to do it on a yacht.
      But how will you defend yourself from pirates?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Pretty sure the yacht Bezos has is well fortified.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What blew up now?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      "What blew up now" is clearly super effective against vatniks, thus the constant and ubiquitous campaign to discredit it, lol.
      Thanks for confirming it makes you really, really angry.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Since I was a kid. One of my dreams if I ever got "frick you I'm rich" money. I'd want to buy and bury a frigate or something in the desert and just live in it.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yeah (not a joke)

      totally under the sand or like floating on the sand?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Up to the deck or so. Maybe bury the crew compartment side, for the sake of temperature control.

        Just live in my own comfy bunker with a cool little tower.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    according to the accounts of people who served on the fletcher-class, no they were not comfy at all
    they were ships designed for long range endurance, so that meant very cramped quarters and not a lot of stability
    they were also made with the pacific in mind, so they would rock and roll like crazy in the north atlantic where they were forced to serve

    crew quarters on the fletcher were also spartan, they still used the hammock type berthing and stuffed more people per room than any modern ship

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >they were also made with the pacific in mind, so they would rock and roll like crazy in the north atlantic where they were forced to serve
      what's the difference between the two, is the Atlantic choppier?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I I've never heard this before but the Pacific and Atlantic tend to (usually) be calmer in general the closer they are to the equator. The closer to the arctic and antarctic you are the more tumultuous they become. In WW2 the Pacific Theater was a bit more equatorial than actions in the Atlantic. So maybe that's the idea?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The North Sea is the roughest and most dangerous sea in the entire world.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        One is literally called the Pacific, what do you think?

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    breathing diesel fumes and asbestos 24x7. sharing a bunk next to hot noisy equipment. have to walk sideways through all corridors. not allowed on deck for months because of rough seas. one shower per week.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hell yeah! Just the way I like it.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nah, I get seasick. As much as I yearn for the sea I know I'm stuck on land.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Destroyers in the high seas during shitty weather suck ass at least according to my uncle.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's funny cause I remeber reading the memoirs of a guy who served on a Flower-class corvette in ww2. He said he envied the destroyer crews for how well their ships handled the sea. I guess it's all a matter of perspective...

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Bigger ships handle rough seas better, generally speaking.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Flower Class were notoriously shit to serve on in the North Atlantic. They were essentially a whaling ship redesigned designed for near littoral patrols, pressed into service as long range escorts.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They were not comfy in the slightest. They started off crowded before WW2 and got worse as crew size increased to accommodate new tech and weaponry.

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    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that looks like absolute hell.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Navy sounds like hell. I would go insane if I didn't have a quiet place to avoid other people and a good 10 square meters to myself. What ship was the most automated, or had the smallest crew relative to its size?

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    in the north atlantic maybe, at least it's cool and comfy inside when the boilers are running.

    but in the pacific? frick no, it must have been absolutely miserable on any ship in the pacific theater. The heat and humidity combined with being trapped in a ship without any AC at the time would have been misery.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I imagine it must be comfy.
      Well ain't you a special kind of stupid.

      >cool and comfy inside
      I've heard that the HMS Belfast could have an inch of ice covering the inside of her turrets. Real comfy for the people sitting around in there just waiting for shit to hit the fan. Then once they returned down south again that starting melting, and since you have apparently never known even somewhat chilly weather you'll just have to trust me when I say that would make for its own particular kind of hell. Though of course if you get assigned to the boiler rooms, yeah, cool ain't gonna be part of it no matter where you are.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'd much rather be cold wearing cold weather outfits than in the heat and humidity of the pacific. Safer environment too especially post 1942.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          So you're fat and live somewhere hot, whatever. We're talking "comfy" here, and no, you sure as frick wouldn't be comfy stuck on a destroyer escorting convoys to Murmansk. The north Atlantic on a WW2 warship isn't a comfy cool any more than Phoenix is pleasantly warm

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >destroyer
    homie chose the most uncomfortable barge to be stuck in lol

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Isn't there a yacht that was built using a WW2 destroyer? It was originally Canadian iirc.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't that the one thing less comfortable than a destroyer?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        lol no.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No sunlight, more space constraints? How could it be more comfortable?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        seems fine to me, basically a control room then a long hallway with curtained bunks, seats, kitchen on the sides.
        you're underwater! so no seasickness.
        unlimited fuel/electricity.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >comfy
    Sure, if you like hot, cold, and moving up and down more than you roll side to side (which is a lot; you will walk on the lower walls sometimes).

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You're not alone. Tramp steamers and all manner of maritime careers were once a way of life for many men mis-fit to "civilized" society in some way or another. The last vestiges of that culture hang on in the likes of Maine's lobster fleet or various Alaskan fisheries.

    The reality of trying to fuel, maintain, and berth a DD is sadly even harsher than those commercial pursuits. Closest you'll likely see is a preserved or replica Tall Ship via a trust or nonprofit organization, some like Sultana even carry functional cannon. Who knows though, a leader of singular drive and dedication could - with a decade of effort - make arrangements to make one of the pierside attractions seaworthy again, as the CAF or Flying Heritage Musuem have accomplished for aviation. Maybe it's (you).

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What were the comfiest warships to serve on in ww2? I would be tempted to say Battleships since they were big enough to handle the sea well and they were less likely to be used in combat compared to other ships, but maybe cruisers had better crew quarters since by design they were more likely to take part in longer operations?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      probably yamato and musashi. they had climate controled living and working spaces and rather nice quarters for even the oridinary sailors. even had a judo gym and a fitness center.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        For real? That's sounds like a hotel.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >That's sounds like a hotel.
          musashi in particular was nicknamed the palace and yamato had a working elevator for officers and accomodations for the emperor and his entourage
          >The Italian Vittorio Veneto class also had extremely gorgeous art deco interiors
          definitely. even more so when compared to the conditions on some comparable vessels like the KGVs. it's a shame none of the interiors were kept as museums, scrapping her must have been depressing.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >it's a shame none of the interiors were kept as museums, scrapping her must have been depressing
            I bet my ass that some of those sofas and armchairs ended up in the living room of whoever was responsible for the salvage operations

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Same with the cutlery and glassware.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Italian Vittorio Veneto class also had extremely gorgeous art deco interiors, with bars and good quarters for the crew. Here is a pretty big gallery of the Roma.

        https://imgur.com/a/RSMpp

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A destroyer or small cruiser with a good captain. Big enough to be capable of independent action and thus assigned a variety of missions. Small enough to evade the spit-and-polish discipline of the battle fleet.

      Crew accommodations will vary by navy and intended endurance of the vessel in question as well as rank - it's difficult to generalize.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I would be tempted to say Battleships since they were big enough to handle the sea well
      That depends entirely on where you're operating

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