Zero to Denali Summit Bid - Rate my Plan

Hello, PrepHole, long time lurker first time poster.

tl:dr; Two friends and I have discussed how we've always loved mountains and want to climb them. After discussing and researching we have signed a suicide blood pact to climb Denali before we die.

In subsequent posts I will detail our training and progression plan and also provide a description of each party member. Please rate this plan and let us know what we could do better. Our locations are NorCal, SoCal, and Michigan.

Thank you in advance!

>inb4 ur gonna die
We'll take it extremely seriously and slowly if needed, we accept the risk of death.

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Trio:

    Member 1: Me. Former soccer player turned strongman turned powerlifter, I lost 160lbs and started training for the USAF Special Forces Fitness Standards for fun. Recently had successful knee surgery that is now recovered (torn lateral meniscus 8 sutures.)
    I pull a 200lb sled around in 108 degree heat and have done fingertip pull ups as well as 1 finger per hand pull ups. I'm 6'8" and 260lbs but plan to cut to 220-230lbs by our first summit bid next May with a heavy focus on hard cardio.

    Member 2: Former eagle scout senior trauma nurse. Bodybuilder, lean but not in great cardio shape at this time but has the discipline to do it over the next 10 months before Shasta. Very autistic about gear and medical things. Already knows a lot of rope and knot skills, can make a self-ascender on a tree, etc. 5'11 175lbs

    Member 3: Best cardio athlete of the group. Former Div 1 water polo player who now runs marathons, including some on trails at altitude in Montana. Excellent discipline and focus. Maybe 5'10 160lbs

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Two friends and I have discussed how we've always loved mountains and want to climb them.
    So you're all talk and no action?
    Thanks for the wall of text but that's all we needed to know

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I am not interested in the opinions of anyone with anime images saved to their computer who negs someone trying to get into climbing.

      2/2 below shortly.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I am not interested in the opinions of anyone with anime images saved to their computer who negs someone trying to get into climbing.
        I don't like contributing OC to fantasy and roleplay threads, but if you insist, here you go

        OP There's a big difference between:
        >I saw some XTREME youtube videos once and now I'm PASSIONATE about climbing mountains. Spoonfeed me everything I've never even gone backpacking before
        v.s.
        >Here's the mountains our team has climbed, here's our experience with glacier traverse, what steps do I need to take to get to the next level?

        >inb4 why are you being so rude
        OP you're some PrepHoleizen PrepHoletard type, obviously you've made that part of your identity.

        Let's say some skinny kid who's never boxed before but has been doing pushups and chinups at home says he wants to go to the state championships for heavyweight boxing.
        But he's never boxed before. Sure, he's not totally out of shape, but he has zero skills in that area at all.
        Would you laugh at him for his goals for being unrealistic and tell him to aim for a lower, more realistic goal, or cheer him on in his delusions?

        Mountaineering is not the same as lifting weights in a gym. For all we care you might be squeamish and scared of the cold or hte outdoors. After all, you did mention you're from california and have never gone backpacking before

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I've never posted on PrepHole before in my life and don't visit those boards. It amazes me how negative some people can be. I've never met a genuinely accomplished person in any field who was extremely negative, jealous, and gatekeepy so I can only assume you're not a real climber.

          If you are, I'm sorry for whatever happened in your childhood that made you so hostile to genuine newcomers.

          >Let's say some skinny kid who's never boxed before but has been doing pushups and chinups at home says he wants to go to the state championships for heavyweight boxing.

          As someone who lost 160+ lbs and went from fatass to borderline elite athlete, I'd say go for it kid and help him on his way. People can do great things when they set their mind to them.

          Also, I'm not doing this for youtube clout. I'm doing this because I've stood at the foot of mountains and been in awe of them, and never thought I was "that guy" to go to the top. I decided I want to be that guy, starting today.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You can do it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I've never met a genuinely accomplished person in any field who was extremely negative, jealous, and gatekeepy so I can only assume you're not a real climber.
            looks like you caught me red-handed OP, oops, sorry, please disregard my previous posts

            https://i.imgur.com/lSSZ5i4.jpg

            >Fall 2022: Team backpacking trip on easy terrain in the NorCal redwoods to build team rapport and shake out any rust for outdoorsmanship.
            you mean a normal weekend?

            you PrepHole tourists are too cute.
            Do you call going to the grocery store with your mom a "team building exercise in executive decision making and negotiation" too?

            kek i only skimmed his "plan" but good catch

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Okay the important part: The plan and sequence. 1/2

    Fall 2022: Team backpacking trip on easy terrain in the NorCal redwoods to build team rapport and shake out any rust for outdoorsmanship.

    Winter 2023/4: Snow camping and backpacking trip as a team, practice some basic mountaineering on our own like ice axe self arrests on some bunny slopes, make and sleep in an ice cave, shake out any issues with our cold weather gear.

    Early Spring 2023: Do the south side of Half Dome in the offseason, practicing carabineer and rope work on the cables which will not be elevated on hand rails at that time.

    May 2023: Do a 2 day Glacier I class + 2 day summit attempt on Mt Shasta with Shasta Guides Company (Level 2) (guided)

    ~July 2023: Do a 5-6 day more advanced Glacier travel and rescue class + summit attempt package with RMI guides on Mt Rainier (Level 3) (guided)

    ~Late summer 2023: Do a double-header of Elbert and Pikes Peak in CO. Practice night descending and ascending with headlamps.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sequence 2/2

      Winter 2023/4: Do a guided and an unguided winter summit. Possibly Rainier again with RMI and St Helens, Shasta or some other easier Cascades peak unguided to apply skills without help.

      Summer 2024: Acancagua or some other near-20,000-footer in South America to practice cardio at those altitudes and see how we hold up in the thin air.

      Winter-Spring 2024/5: Do another, harder, unguided winter summit plus a Denali Prep Seminar with ShastaGuides, RMI, or whoever offers the best and most experienced class on this.

      Summer 2025: Denali

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Fall 2022: Team backpacking trip on easy terrain in the NorCal redwoods to build team rapport and shake out any rust for outdoorsmanship.
      you mean a normal weekend?

      you PrepHole tourists are too cute.
      Do you call going to the grocery store with your mom a "team building exercise in executive decision making and negotiation" too?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        we have never gone with eachother before so I included it to be exhaustive.

        Again, I've never met an accomplished and person in any field who was so hostile to helping a newcomer achieve the same passion that they had. Very interesting psyche you have.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        dude why are you seething so hard? at least its a more interesting discussion than the frogposting.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You sure are spending a lot of money on guides/courses. You should really only need to do that once to learn basic glacier skills, if at all.

      Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier? Rainier seems to have much more glaciers, Whitney is a quite rocky trail from what I've seen.

      Makes sense re classes but I just kinda want to start somewhere. Where did you learn your skills? Some friend or family member?

      >Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier?
      No definitely not. Whitney doesn't have any glaciers. Rainier is covered in them. (pic related, from around 13k ft on rainier as of a few weeks ago)

      But seriously I think your plan is overkill. Take like one course on a glaciated mountain (Rainier, Baker, North side of Shasta, etc.) to learn the general skills. Then start doing things on your own.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I should also mention I am less fit then you described yourself and made it up Rainier without issue.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      elbert may be the highest, but it's one of the easier 14ers. It seems weird to fly to CO as some sort of prep for your trip and then do one of the easier ones?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Well, I was just thinking of ways to practice night ascent and descent and the idea was to do both it and Pikes in 2 days or even same day for a great workout. Was also thinking of brining some less fit friends who aren't as into the whole snow thing.

        However, if there are some level 3 or 4 Rockies peaks you recommend, hit me!

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No idea. I'm new to the CO area so not that familiar yet. But I'm heading to Elbert in a few weeks.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If anyone has experience with Shasta Guides, RMI, or any other company I'd like to know who offers the best classes for learning the skills and tackling progressively harder climbs.

    Also, it goes without saying, but we'll all be busting ass on cardio + relevant weight training, balance, etc, and doing autistic research on gear and whatnot. We've all started learning the rope skills at home and will be running up and down our local hills and mountains as much as we can.

    For example, I want to get out to Mt Diablo in the SF bay area and run up and down it twice for 6.2k vertical feet regularly.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      NOLS is a good school

      Attempting Denali via the West Buttress any later than early July is not advised because landing a bush plane on the southeast fork of the Kahliltna Galcier becomes too dangerous. The weather is typically more stable in May, but colder. And vice versa, the weather is typically warmer in June and July, but typically less stable. Also later in the season, the crevasses are much more exposed, especially on the lower part of the mountain.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >NOLS is a good school
        Noted, thanks. Hope they operate out of areas I'm close to.

        >Attempting Denali via the West Buttress any later than early July is not advised because landing a bush plane on the southeast fork of the Kahliltna Galcier becomes too dangerous. The weather is typically more stable in May, but colder. And vice versa, the weather is typically warmer in June and July, but typically less stable. Also later in the season, the crevasses are much more exposed, especially on the lower part of the mountain.

        I read similar things online. They also said that since 2015, global warming etc have made for weird weather and low pressure systems above the peak in July that often see expeditions cancelled, because they pack them tightly and don't have schedule room for waiting out a storm. I would want to do it earlier in that case, and I'm also less worried about cold than the crevasses and avalanches that seem to be more of a problem later on. Thoughts?

        https://i.imgur.com/Q7dWfir.png

        >Give me the QRD on the name change haha
        /pol/morons who have never stepped foot in alaska got butthurt when USGS finally changed the name to what locals have always called it

        [...]
        >My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers,
        glacier traverse is not the same as top roping. Maybe multipitch skills would translate, but even then the routefinding is completely different

        [...]
        >I've never posted on PrepHole before in my life and don't visit those boards. It amazes me how negative some people can be.
        they're just oldfags who are (rightfully) upset that PrepHole was flooded with a bunch of newfags from other boards ever since the covid happened. PrepHole used to be a nice board, but all the nice people got chased away by the shitposting, and whoever is still around gets upset whenever they encounter self-proclaimed newfags
        best thing to do is grow a thicker skin and lurk more before posting

        >name change
        Yeah tbh I think it's cooler to name it after a local native god / "Great One" legend than just the guy who discovered it. Not that I don't respect explorers etc, but mountains are just so majestic and huge they're almost like pagan gods and I like native names better I guess.

        https://i.imgur.com/Q7dWfir.png

        >Give me the QRD on the name change haha
        /pol/morons who have never stepped foot in alaska got butthurt when USGS finally changed the name to what locals have always called it

        [...]
        >My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers,
        glacier traverse is not the same as top roping. Maybe multipitch skills would translate, but even then the routefinding is completely different

        [...]
        >I've never posted on PrepHole before in my life and don't visit those boards. It amazes me how negative some people can be.
        they're just oldfags who are (rightfully) upset that PrepHole was flooded with a bunch of newfags from other boards ever since the covid happened. PrepHole used to be a nice board, but all the nice people got chased away by the shitposting, and whoever is still around gets upset whenever they encounter self-proclaimed newfags
        best thing to do is grow a thicker skin and lurk more before posting

        >Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier?
        Good question I don’t have an answer to.
        My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers, and some outdoor top rope stuff, but I did that with a much more experience friend who was local and set everything up.
        I’ve never done anything that needed more than micro spikes and trekking poles, because I just don’t live close enough to mountains or have the time or money to make real mountaineering a regular part of my life.

        Whintney's main trail seems easy in summer, but the winter "Mountaineer's Route" features some fairly scary-looking sideways traversals of steep snowbanks on a different side of the mountain. Looked actually more dangerous than Rainier or most of the other mountains discussed ITT. Not ready for that yet, but would want to someday.

        https://i.imgur.com/Q7dWfir.png

        >Give me the QRD on the name change haha
        /pol/morons who have never stepped foot in alaska got butthurt when USGS finally changed the name to what locals have always called it

        [...]
        >My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers,
        glacier traverse is not the same as top roping. Maybe multipitch skills would translate, but even then the routefinding is completely different

        [...]
        >I've never posted on PrepHole before in my life and don't visit those boards. It amazes me how negative some people can be.
        they're just oldfags who are (rightfully) upset that PrepHole was flooded with a bunch of newfags from other boards ever since the covid happened. PrepHole used to be a nice board, but all the nice people got chased away by the shitposting, and whoever is still around gets upset whenever they encounter self-proclaimed newfags
        best thing to do is grow a thicker skin and lurk more before posting

        >Class-4 14ers
        From what I've read Denali is class 4 but doesn't require much rope techniques, there is 1 fixed rope stretch but otherwise it just sounds like a very arduous, cold, and stormy hike across glaciers with some avalanche risk. Would you recommend learning top-roping first anyway?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >than just the guy who discovered it.
          You 4chanmorons need to read a book, take your meds and fuck off back to redit

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's named for President McKinley you mouth breather

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Oh, and I'm going to go to the nearest climbing gym to practice rope work with a partner and get some climbing skills, even though the mountains listed are not technical climbs.
    So, what skills are we missing? What guide groups or classes would be better? What mountains would be better than what I've listed. Help us refine this plan. Thanks! Will lurk.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you just wanna reach the peak, and aren’t looking to make snow/ice mountaineering a regular part of your life, then the cheapest and quickest way is to hire an experienced guide through a reputable company who can provide you with the specialized equipment and will have the knowledge needed through years of specialized training classes and experience on the mountain.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I do want to make it part of my life, but good advice. You're saying it'd be doable for a very fit person with zero experience? I feel like even with a guide I want us to have plenty of experience to be able to assist in say, a crevasse rescue, and not fuck our shit up and be totally reliant on the guide. Thoughts?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you just wanna reach the peak, and aren’t looking to make snow/ice mountaineering a regular part of your life, then the cheapest and quickest way is to hire an experienced guide through a reputable company who can provide you with the specialized equipment and will have the knowledge needed through years of specialized training classes and experience on the mountain.

        Addendum: On RMI's site they offer guided Denali trips for like $8k, but even they say they want you to have snowy mountain summit experience, skills, and experience above 14k feet. So I don't think you can just hire someone to get you up there.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        Addendum: On RMI's site they offer guided Denali trips for like $8k, but even they say they want you to have snowy mountain summit experience, skills, and experience above 14k feet. So I don't think you can just hire someone to get you up there.

        You should call them and ask them more specific questions about what kind of experience they want to take you.
        For example; ask if a guided summer trip up Mt. Whitney would qualify you, or would it need to be a winter guided trip?
        If yes; ask them for what guides they suggest
        If they say it needs to be a bigger peak (Alaska peak with height in between Whitney and Denali), ask them what peak and what guide.
        Then go down the list until you get to the start by asking each subsequent lower level guide what other guided trip you need to go on to qualify.
        You will probably end it at at the Shasta guided trip, and they can tell you what specific classes to take to go

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'm sure we could do Whitney without a guide, I've seen boomers and a 6 year old do it in my research this week haha. But yeah good to ask questions. Also it's really hard to get permits for Whitney so probably not the best mountain.

          As for the other Alaskan peaks, it's pretty expensive to get up there so I'd rather stay closer to home if possible, but if they're the best prep I'd do it. Obviously height =/= difficulty so would have to do more research on that.

          Definitely agree that talking to actual guides and people in the field is the best policy.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I’ve never done Whitney, but yah summer trips up it seem easy enough to do without a guide, as long as you have some glacier experience, which is why I would expect them to say it needs to be a winter trip up Whitney at least.
            I would assume some of these smaller guided trips will tell you that you need a specific class or classes in addition to a specific previous guided trip, so your experience will build as you go on larger and more extensive trips.
            Tl;dr
            Don’t just take a class or go on a trip assuming it will be relevant, it might be an unnecessary waste of time and money.
            Start asking questions at the top, and work your way down to where you are now

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier? Rainier seems to have much more glaciers, Whitney is a quite rocky trail from what I've seen.

              Makes sense re classes but I just kinda want to start somewhere. Where did you learn your skills? Some friend or family member?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier?
                Good question I don’t have an answer to.
                My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers, and some outdoor top rope stuff, but I did that with a much more experience friend who was local and set everything up.
                I’ve never done anything that needed more than micro spikes and trekking poles, because I just don’t live close enough to mountains or have the time or money to make real mountaineering a regular part of my life.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Ok no worries, thanks! What mountains did you do and how did you like them?

                That looks like Mount McKinley

                Give me the QRD on the name change haha

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Give me the QRD on the name change haha
                /pol/morons who have never stepped foot in alaska got butthurt when USGS finally changed the name to what locals have always called it

                >Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier?
                Good question I don’t have an answer to.
                My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers, and some outdoor top rope stuff, but I did that with a much more experience friend who was local and set everything up.
                I’ve never done anything that needed more than micro spikes and trekking poles, because I just don’t live close enough to mountains or have the time or money to make real mountaineering a regular part of my life.

                >My experience is some class-4 14ers’ over a number of 5-day trips in Colorado summers,
                glacier traverse is not the same as top roping. Maybe multipitch skills would translate, but even then the routefinding is completely different

                I've never posted on PrepHole before in my life and don't visit those boards. It amazes me how negative some people can be. I've never met a genuinely accomplished person in any field who was extremely negative, jealous, and gatekeepy so I can only assume you're not a real climber.

                If you are, I'm sorry for whatever happened in your childhood that made you so hostile to genuine newcomers.

                >Let's say some skinny kid who's never boxed before but has been doing pushups and chinups at home says he wants to go to the state championships for heavyweight boxing.

                As someone who lost 160+ lbs and went from fatass to borderline elite athlete, I'd say go for it kid and help him on his way. People can do great things when they set their mind to them.

                Also, I'm not doing this for youtube clout. I'm doing this because I've stood at the foot of mountains and been in awe of them, and never thought I was "that guy" to go to the top. I decided I want to be that guy, starting today.

                >I've never posted on PrepHole before in my life and don't visit those boards. It amazes me how negative some people can be.
                they're just oldfags who are (rightfully) upset that PrepHole was flooded with a bunch of newfags from other boards ever since the covid happened. PrepHole used to be a nice board, but all the nice people got chased away by the shitposting, and whoever is still around gets upset whenever they encounter self-proclaimed newfags
                best thing to do is grow a thicker skin and lurk more before posting

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >glacier traverse is not the same as top roping.
                For sure, I don’t have glacier experience, and would at least want some experience with crevasse rescues (either from a dedicated class or pre-trip training from a guide) before I tried to do a glaciated peak without a guide

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >oldfags
                Yeah, I know it's tempting to gatekeep normies that litter in nature and have no idea what they're talking about. I'm a newbie but I'm serious and have huge respect for nature, so I appreciate the civility.

                >glacier traverse is not the same as top roping.
                For sure, I don’t have glacier experience, and would at least want some experience with crevasse rescues (either from a dedicated class or pre-trip training from a guide) before I tried to do a glaciated peak without a guide

                yeah OP here, agree, re

                https://i.imgur.com/PJQQTjd.jpg

                You sure are spending a lot of money on guides/courses. You should really only need to do that once to learn basic glacier skills, if at all.

                [...]
                >Is winter Whitney harder/better glacier prep than Rainier?
                No definitely not. Whitney doesn't have any glaciers. Rainier is covered in them. (pic related, from around 13k ft on rainier as of a few weeks ago)

                But seriously I think your plan is overkill. Take like one course on a glaciated mountain (Rainier, Baker, North side of Shasta, etc.) to learn the general skills. Then start doing things on your own.

                spending money on guides and courses, I have no idea how else to learn things like crevasse rescue and i dont live close enough to a mountain to just go try it myself, let alone would i want to try that with my noob friends without instructions. I feel like two guide companies on two mountains will help build better muscle memory that i can use unguided eventually. If we wanna blow a few grand on being twice as confident we won't die in a crevasse and never see our wives again, I think that's reasonable, but i appreciate the confidence that one course would be enough.

                >plan is overkill
                Fair enough, we could probably bump it up to a faster pace. Again appreciate the confidence as I had no idea how to build this. However, we do want to summit a lot of cool mountains besides Denali if we can, so it's also just sort of a tour of progressive mountains that we will enjoy individually.

                >Then start doing things on your own.
                Okay this is where I definitely need advice. Once we're confident on glaciers, what mountains will pose a good challenge where we won't die straight away? Rainier again but in the winter? Mt Hood? Would appreciate a rough list of good mountains for relative newbie unguided glacier climbs. Thanks!!

                I should also mention I am less fit then you described yourself and made it up Rainier without issue.

                Boss, great to hear. We definitely want to learn the skills, too though, and not just be super fit know-nothings who fall in a hole

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can do it.

        well rainier is basically "pay to win" and OP his no qualms about paying his way up, so yeah, he can probably do it after a year of tredmill practice

        >a guided summer trip up Mt. Whitney
        lol you're joking, right?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          are those toilets at the top of the mountain? wow...that takes a bit of the romanticism out of it, huh?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes those are toilets, but it's at Camp Muir at 10k ft on Rainier. Still 4400ft below the summit.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes those are toilets, but it's at Camp Muir at 10k ft on Rainier. Still 4400ft below the summit.

            lol that's so weird. Who the fuck built the shelter on top of Mt. Whitney? Did a bunch of mexicans truck up the materials?

            Edit: Looks like they had donkeys carry the stuff up in 1909. Must have been a tricky trip with a mule if they got stubborn.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Edit: Looks like they had donkeys carry the stuff up in 1909. Must have been a tricky trip with a mule if they got stubborn.

              >"help me go from zero experience to extreme mountaineering"
              >redditspacing every post
              >"edit: thanks for the upvotes"
              Is this a subtle reddit troll thread?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Would you rather see human feces everywhere?

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              no, obviously not. im just saying you go set out to do something adventurous like trying to climb a mountain, it brings to mind certain ideas like remoteness, and hard work, and intrepidness. and then you show up after a long ass climb and its just pit toilets like you never left the parking lot. just takes some of the spark out.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                If you want remoteness and a real mountaineering challenge on Rainier, go climb Liberty Ridge.

                The standard route on Rainier is crowded and the only real challenge is physical.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anyway, I'm going to lurk for a couple of days and reply to non-mentally-ill posters with helpful advice. Thanks in advance.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen very fit dudes bang out Rainier in a day, I know Shasta can be done in a day by relative normies, so the main reason I wanna work with guides and classes to acquire the skills. IDK how else to acquire these skills but if anons have advice that's one of the main things I'm looking for.

    It doesn't seem like something you can just watch a youtube tutorial for and try for the first time when you're falling down a slope, lol

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That looks like Mount McKinley

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You should watch a interview with someone who actually climbed Denali. The mountain is brutal, one of the hardest in all the Americas.
    If you don't have a quality resume of mountains you climbed they will turn you down at the gate and straight up not allow you to climb it. You should do more research and start smaller.
    Do you even know how long an average denali climb takes a skilled mountain climber?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not OP but
      >two weeks
      That's crazy

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >two weeks
        In best conditions if you're world class and racing up the mountain maybe.
        Expect closer to 5 weeks for a first time summit.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not OP but
      >two weeks
      That's crazy

      Yeah I've seen 2-3 weeks. The point is that it's hard, and we're working up to it over years.

      If you want remoteness and a real mountaineering challenge on Rainier, go climb Liberty Ridge.

      The standard route on Rainier is crowded and the only real challenge is physical.

      Is Liberty Ridge more technical?

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