WW2 Ranger Battalion Training and Selection

Is there any left over books, manuals, doctrine of the classic ww2 Rangers? We know they trained with Brit commandos in Carrickfergus Northern Ireland, but is there any info left over from that era? I would imagine they used an older form of the doctrine in the Ranger handbook,
Or were they just Super Grunts that got extra specialized training in rappelling, and breaching with bombs

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I am also interested. Had a copy of "Merrill's Marauders" sitting on my shelf for years I've never read. Maybe that has some doctrine info.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    burmp

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    bing bong

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I was in 2nd Batt. We had a WWII Ranger who scaled Pointe du Hoc come speak with us. This was early 2000. I joined in 1999. He said they were mostly selected for rope climbing skill.
    The smallest, fastest guys up the ropes were called "monkeys." He said that is pretty much all they did all day long in prep for the invasion at Pointe du Hoc -- climb ropes. The cliff was 100 feet tall and had 5 large coastal artillery guns atop it. 2nd Ranger Battalion was assigned to scale the cliff, eliminate the guns, and hold the position.
    The landing craft fired rocket-launched grappling hooks and ropes onto a giant mesh of barbed wire at the top of the cliff. Then the monkeys jumped on the ropes and started climbing like crazy. The slowest climbing Rangers on the beach laid down suppressive fire with BARs. The old Ranger was not the fastest so he was in the middle of the ascent. He said the Germans were tossing grenades down the cliff constantly and fired MG 42s straight down at them occasionally. The Germans cut about 75% of the ropes but there were still enough to eventually overwhelm the Germans. They eventually made it to the top, killed everyone that did not run, and melted the breaches and barrels of the 155mm guns with thermite.

    They started the assault with 225 Rangers. When they were relieved, only 90 Rangers were left.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, so, the fact that they actually pulled that manouver off in face of those casualties is nothing short of superhuman. I guess it was climb or die, cause they couldn't just stay down on the beach, but still.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The very first ones were put through the bong commando course in the Scottish Highlands, and conducted their first operations with bong commandos. After that point I am not sure. I did have the initial booklet from the early 40's which sets out exactly what you are talking about but have now lost it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Too add:

      >I would imagine they used an older form of the doctrine in the Ranger handbook.

      Initially they followed bong commando doctrine to the letter. As that's what they were set up as: A US commando unit.

      >Or were they just Super Grunts that got extra specialized training in rappelling, and breaching with bombs

      Kind of yes. That's what Commandos/Rangers were. Elite shock assault infantry who could operate in small groups.

      Also I would point out that modern rangers are indeed 'super grunts' in that they represent an elite infantry unit. Comparable to RM/Para/FFL.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        More elite though than the FFL
        The FFL is similar to Marines
        Rangers mostly do just direct action stuff

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe a suitable thread to ask. I'm not from or in USA. But I recently got a couple of brass coin with the US marking on them and am wondering which US uniforms they are suitable for. I assume Ike service jackets, but what else? And what time period? My sum total of genuine US jackets right now is an M1941 field jacket and I dont think they are meant for that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You mean buttons? You need to post pic and more description for more help.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Closest I can get as yet. My sample has slightly smaller dots and only a single screw with nut/wheel on the back.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          OK now I see, those are US Army collar disks. They have been in use from 1910 to present day with some manufacture variations. They are for enlisted people. They are worn with the US disk on one side and MOS (military occupational specialty, job group symbol) on the other. Here is a quick site to give you some help.

          https://hglanham.tripod.com/metalinsignia/collardisk1.html

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks, that solved it! Apparently I have the "Unclassified Disk Type WWII era" right down to the tiny PC stamp. Now I just need to find myself a suitable left side collar disk to match it with. And a service dress tunic to put it on. But it is definitely a step forward. Thanks!

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              NP, good luck finding the other side online outside the US. They are a dime a dozen in the US and can be found at gun shows, flea markets, swap meets, antique store and such. After spending 14 years in the Army Reserve I probably have 5 modren sets sitting in my box of uniform shit.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Hah, that's where I found the collar coins - in a gun show in USA. I would probably have found a matching one if I had known I was needing one. Ah well, I will be back.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There were other special forces in ww2 theres that devils brigade group sas were also apprently active then. If you want to look up ww2 special forces they might be for you

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Commandos were not special forces. Rangers & Devils brigade were commandos. Not SF.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Related sort of but not completely, the OSS training and selection in the US was covered in "You're Stepping on My Cloak and Dagger".

    Been awhile since I read, but was rpetty funny in parts. At one point the training area they used was an old golf course and village that the author grew up at so he knew it like the back of his hand and ticked off his instructors,

    He also got pressed in as a stress test somewhere to make a speech out of the blue about buying war bonds in front of a ton of people. Apparently he did great and the speech was motivating and he sold a ton. He failed because a reporter wrote an article about it with his photo in the paper.

    There were also suicide pills they had that they could swallow with no problem, however biting into them woiuld be the killer.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *