Would you support having officers carry sabers again?

Would you support having officers carry sabers again?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It would just cause a ton of accidental injuries to butterbars, so I wholeheartedly endorse it

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Only for ceremony, it would just add unnecessary weight and get in the way for operations. Also it would look god awful on a modern combat uniform

      Bowie Knives would be more practical and more American.

      This or tomahawks.

      >Sabers for dress uniforms
      >Bowie knives or tomahawks for combat.
      Sounds like a plan.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Only for ceremony, it would just add unnecessary weight and get in the way for operations. Also it would look god awful on a modern combat uniform

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Also it would look god awful on a modern combat uniform
      Modern combat uniforms look awful anyway. We need to go back.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I fricking agree.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Civil war uniformes kinda looked like shit though
        Same with Europe at the same time

        18th century is the GOAT though

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The civil war was massive endeavors that put tremendous strain on manufacturing and logistics. Of course the uniforms for anyone who wasn’t an officer would be lacking.

          https://i.imgur.com/hoRLe54.jpg

          How do you rate Sweden's new ceremonial sabers?

          7/10

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        God damn people were small back then

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bowie Knives would be more practical and more American.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This or tomahawks.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        winkler rnd is truly the fancy meele weapon of the modern era
        also nowadays we need more compact weapons because of vehicles and combat in cities

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          This is untrue, though. With an overall length of just 13", the Winkler RND is a totally dogshit weapon. Historical tomahawks were usually in the 20-25" range, and striking weapons just don't work well -- for leverage and range reasons -- if they're any shorter than that.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Historical tomahawks were usually in the 20-25"

            ?si=q8bHXF7keqak7bDe&t=52

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              He's right about weights.
              Along much the same lines, there's an old Persian manual on the fighting mace, or saddle mace, where the author claims that the optimal weight for a mace is one pound.
              That said, 12-13" is a dogshit length for a striking weapon. Most historical tomahawk examples are >20", e.g.
              > https://www.bonhams.com/auction/27783/lot/58/a-rare-north-american-tomahawk/

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            People fail to understand that most historical fighting tomahawks were basically battle axes with relatively short hafts.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Indeed. Some are almost indistinguishable from knightly horseman's axes, e.g.: https://www.bonhams.com/auction/28013/lot/6/an-apache-tomahawk/
              Though this is something of an extreme example at 37" long.
              25" is about average. It's really weird to see them under 18", and 13" is a sort of different weapon entirely.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                weapons differed between tribes living on the plains and in the woods, in the woods you needed a shorter weapon

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You mean like the 25"-30+" warclubs used by the woodland tribes?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                never seen that

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That doesn't surprise me.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >With an overall length of just 13", the Winkler RND is a totally dogshit weapon
            This is a really dumb opinion. The winkler hawk isn't meant to defeat chain-mail over a gambeson or plate armor because this isnt the 1600s. The benefit of longer shafts are obvious when fighting other armored melee combatants, but it's actually a detriment in modern warfare. The last time professional soldiers seriously engaged in melee combat tot he death was in the trenches of ww1 and what they quickly learned was that the optimal weapon length for daggers and maces was about 10-11 inches. Anything longer introduced serious problems. People assume that just because a weapon inst imposing that it cant totally frick you up. Just look at the sap, the ultimate percussion weapon for the urban man. I've brained a large dog with a 7 inch, 400 gram lead sap. Put it to bed possibly forever with one hit.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              > the optimal weapon length for maces was about 10-11 inches
              There's no way that's true. You're making it up.
              The average length, from auction data, is around 18". They're frequently around 16", as they were made from entrenching tool handles.
              There's literally no benefit to having a 10" mace when you could have a 16" or 18" mace. If you're in very close quarters, you can ride up the handle -- grip your mace higher up the shaft.
              A 12" or 13" mace or tomahawk, to say nothing of 10-11", is an obviously suboptimal weapon. Which you'd know, if you've ever held or used a mace or club

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The winkler trash is by definition a hatchet.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >winkler RnD
          >dogshit design
          >made of some of the cheapest commonly available (in us) chinesium you can get
          >$850
          Lmao get fricked

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            there is a ukronazi copy for a fraction of the price https://ancientsmithy.com/products/compact-tactical-tomahawk-with-polymer-composit-handle

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >tomahawks
        Those are for naval ratings, not officers. The tomahawk is just a Royal Navy boarding axe with some fricking beads and feathers stuck on it.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          > ackshually
          This is a moronic take, considering the tomahawk as a fighting weapon for mounted and dismounted troops, and as a tool for frontiersmen, predates the founding of the USA. Alongside the bowie, it's the closest thing the US has to a home-grown weapon.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It is literally a boarding axe.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Which is literally an archer's axe

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                https://i.imgur.com/QvKwYWT.jpg

                [...]
                Which is literally a Francesca

                Nobody was trading those to the injuns. They *were* trading boarding axes in huge numbers.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                https://i.imgur.com/QvKwYWT.jpg

                [...]
                Which is literally a Francesca

                It is literally a boarding axe.

                Which is literally an ancient axe from the dawn of human civilization.
                Point is, there are only so many ways to make a goddamn axe. If we're talking single-hand axes, there are always only slight variations in form and function. "Ackshually it's a boarding axe" is literally homosexualry and midwit-tier drivel.
                The tomahawk is America's variation -- America's home-grown weapon.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                See above.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                And they were re-hafted and heavily modified. The pipe-axe tomahawk has as much to do with the boarding axe as the boarding axe has to do with the 9th century Francesca.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >And they were re-hafted
                In exactly the same way, purely because it's not worth shipping wood
                >and heavily modified
                As noted, with beads and feathers. If you put a Hello Kitty charm and a new stock on your AR it's still an AR.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Do you realize that almost all boarding axes had spikes, whereas many/most tomahawks did not?
                The fireman's axe is also a derivative of the boarding axe. Go tell a fireman "ackshually that's a boarding axe!" You'll get some funny looks.
                The archetypical tomahawk is the pipe tomahawk, which is the mostly fully-developed form of indigenous tomahawk, and is also what commands the highest prices at auctions.
                https://www.bonhams.com/auction/22401/lot/4195/a-plainsprairie-pipe-tomahawk/
                It's clearly its own weapon, its own aesthetic and its own traditional form of use, and even its own rituals.
                > B-but ackshually. . .

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Guys were smoking weed through ARs in 'nam too. That's not a weapon you fricking idiot, it's what happens when you give stone age monkeys a boarding axe.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >there are only so many ways to make a goddamn axe
                The one that the injuns knew about was using a stone head. They bought the steel ones from sailors.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This is the point that most Native worshippers always seem to leave out.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                bronze really had that special look to it

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              https://i.imgur.com/jZiNlMX.jpg

              Which is literally an archer's axe

              Which is literally a Francesca

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This or tomahawks.

      >ukraine is largely attacking defended positions and trenches
      >gaza is close quarter urban fighting
      I for one look forward to trench knives and trench clubs making a return

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Have you seen the average IDF soldier? I don't think they'd be very effective with trench clubs, anon.
        And short AK-pattern rifles work very well in trenches, anyway.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I carried a bowie in Afghanistan and a Montana Toothpick in Iraq

      This or tomahawks.

      One of the guys in my platoon had a tomahawk.

      I think Toothpicks also deserve a mention.

      There’s actually a reason for that. After the civil war, a lot of research was done in how the union army fought and how it could be improved (this is actually how the NRA came to be when many officers commented that their soldiers didn’t know how to fricking shoot). In a similar vein it was noticed that union cavalrymen had no confidence in their sabers for two main reasons. The first was that there was no consistent drill done for fighting with sabers, so the men carrying them literally had no clue how to use them efficiently. The second, and even dumber reason, was the sabers were most often shipped blunt from the factory and were no issues with equipment to sharpen them. No bullshit, the army was actually dumb enough to do that.

      Pistols and carbines were still the most commonly used weapon in southern cavalry as well, but the southern officers who LARPed as aristocracy were more often able to use their sabers to
      Good effect since part of their culture involved being prepared for a duel. Bedford forest specifically was noted to be an excellent swordsman and allegedly killed 30 men in battle with his saber.

      >Bedford forest specifically was noted to be an excellent swordsman and allegedly killed 30 men in battle with his saber.
      Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was a terrachad who was probably one of the scariest men ever to walk this continent.
      Most officers only sharpened the upper half of their sabers, he had the distinction of sharpening the entire length of the blade; probably so as not to interrupt his killstreak.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I’m going to make a slight “ackshually” on your post and point out that what Bedford forest did wasn’t sharpen the entire length of his blade but the top of the false edge so that he could cut with the opposite side of his saber as well. This common on dueling sabers but not typically cavalry sabers

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    rapiers would be more kino

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The traditional and more practical weapon/tool is the tomahawk, as others have mentioned.
      I wholeheartedly support those being issued as a badge of rank.
      Sabres would be a larp, and rapiers would be just ridiculous.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Dis homie can't fence

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Rapiers went out of fashion in Europe by the 18th century because they were too large and unwieldy to wear as a daily sidearm. They were never (or only extremely rarely) issued as a badge of military rank.
          The idea of giving rapiers to military officers would be laughable in the 19th century. It's completely bonkers today.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Light sabers

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Officers didn't even like carrying them in the Civil War anyways. That was the last time it was a part of the uniform and swords made for infantry officers were built as light as possible because it was just decoration. They wanted guns like picrel.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Indian Wars
      >Spanish American War
      >all the little invasions of jungle shitholes before WW1
      Sabers stuck around.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There’s actually a reason for that. After the civil war, a lot of research was done in how the union army fought and how it could be improved (this is actually how the NRA came to be when many officers commented that their soldiers didn’t know how to fricking shoot). In a similar vein it was noticed that union cavalrymen had no confidence in their sabers for two main reasons. The first was that there was no consistent drill done for fighting with sabers, so the men carrying them literally had no clue how to use them efficiently. The second, and even dumber reason, was the sabers were most often shipped blunt from the factory and were no issues with equipment to sharpen them. No bullshit, the army was actually dumb enough to do that.

      Pistols and carbines were still the most commonly used weapon in southern cavalry as well, but the southern officers who LARPed as aristocracy were more often able to use their sabers to
      Good effect since part of their culture involved being prepared for a duel. Bedford forest specifically was noted to be an excellent swordsman and allegedly killed 30 men in battle with his saber.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >sabers were most often shipped blunt from the factory and were no issues with equipment to sharpen them
        Pretty much every military did that to stop soldiers frickin killing each other in moronic fights when war wasn't on

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Except the war was on and the union cavalry had defective swords

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If youre going to RETVRN to tradition, make it a real mans RETVRN.

    Also someone do me a favour and insert obligatory image of Jackie Churchill with his claymore

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    All nations need to go back to their heritage instead of just adopting sabers.
    Examples:
    >japan: katans
    >US: bowies/tomahawks
    >china: jian/dao
    >south east asia: all their weird machete sword things
    >europe: too many different swords to list
    >etc

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >china: jian/dao
      They already do

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >use jian
        >still wear western clothing
        for what reason

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          its changs meiji period rn

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I think it's a good look personally.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sword of Omens, give me sight beyond sight!

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why the frick is the scabbard kept in the other hand? Is a fricking belt corrupt gweilo technology? Jeez

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Stupid chinks. The superior western man would never do something like-ACK

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Does anybody have the jian copypasta?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >US: Bowies/tomahawks
      Bowies for NCOs and tomahawks for officers, or vice versa? I can see an argument going either way

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Bowies for officers, tomahawks for NCOs. It's easier to make bowies shiny and fancy for officers, and tomahawks would look and be more utilitarian for the NCOs

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Bowie knife
      >””””American”””” heritage
      He died at the Alamo in service to a foreign country and a state that eventually rebelled, considering Fort Hood is now Fort “”””freedom”””” I would not say the Bowie knife is American heritage in the slightest.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Shut up liberal. Americans are speaking

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          you are not American. Stop trying to fit in.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        what the frick does John Bell Hood have to do with anything? He was born after the invention of the Bowie knife and his biggest claim to fame is commanding one of the worst Confederate losses of the war, absolutely bungling his command. Hood was, by his own friends' and admirers' opinions, a terrible general. I agree the fort's name had history and a reputation all its own, and wish it hadn't been changed, but the man behind it never lent any weight to the place beyond having a cool name.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        hahahaha frick off homosexual

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Consider Canadian Healthcare

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Americans have European heritage.

      >Bowie knife
      >””””American”””” heritage
      He died at the Alamo in service to a foreign country and a state that eventually rebelled, considering Fort Hood is now Fort “”””freedom”””” I would not say the Bowie knife is American heritage in the slightest.

      General Hood and General Polk can rest easy knowing that their names are no longer attached to those dumpster fires

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Americans have European heritage
        the proper ones do

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Americans have European heritage
        *had

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This and going back to napoleonic uniforms for parade purposes.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ??? They still carry sabers.
    You can buy them on the RAAF website, got my dad one for his birthday a while back.
    T. Aussie

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No because there is no chivalry or warrior spirit in fat people in chairs operating drones from a thousand miles away.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No, it's fricking gay and moronic

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why carry an outdated weapon? At some point in time swords were a useful weapon. Just carry a rifle, identical meaning.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Curiously there is an actual answer for that. Back in WWI (you know, the one of the trenches), officers had a sword and a pistol as self-defence weapons. And know what? That worked. It allowed the officer (who would do well not to be personally firing rifle shots at the enemy, but properly directing his men to do that!) to be able to fend off any enemy getting close, and pop a shot at ny enemy soldier before they could train a rifle on him. Yet they stopped using swords in just a couple months of war. Why? Because it was "outdated"? No. Because it marked him as an officer. A.K.A. "bullet sponge" for snipers.
      Nowadays officers carry the same weapons as everyone else, not because "officers weapons are outdated", but because carying ANY obvious identification (including better-looking uniforms or front-facing rank insignia) is suicide.
      So yeah. Full support for officers carrying swords. It makes officer removal work all that much easier.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're still carried during ceremonies here in Norway.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anything that makes officers' lives harder

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, an officer is not properly dressed without it

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe, if a horse is also included in the set.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    already doing it fr fr

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      M1861 infantry sabre is sex

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        For me its the 1840. If it worked for Forest than its works for me

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      mongol army best in all of balkans

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the sabre was usually the first thing they ditched in battle because it was annoying as hell
    i do civil war reenacting as dismounted cavalry, meaning i could carry one if i wanted to, but my officers strongly reccomend against it just because of how fricking annoying it is, and so nobody but my officers wear them, and they only wear them because its required for their rank
    that said i may end up getting a sabre just to have around or try atleast once

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Too bad Charlottesville made that moron lose his mind and make him an outspoken Antifa gay. Or for the better. And should have been expected. Dude's from fricking Berkeley, after all.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is that true? I haven’t seen any of his recent work. Is he a gay now?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          other annon, idk I stopped reading shortly after he turned all gayy. Never bothered picking it up again.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You forgot the fact that he's israeli. It's a shame he pulled a sinfest cause TL was actually funny.
        Marine Corps Yumi remains the best marine comic though imo.

        other annon, idk I stopped reading shortly after he turned all gayy. Never bothered picking it up again.

        You're not missing much the new comics are ugly as shit.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          At a certain point he’s going to have to find something other than the marines to talk about right? At this point I’m willing to be he’s been home as a civilian longer than he was in the military.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    U.S. Army officers still have sabers as part of the dress uniform.
    They’re just only used for ceremonies or weddings usually.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe naval officers, but the whole point of army and marine guys' current look is to not stand out from the enlisted. Besides, 99% of the time it would either be dead weight or grossly misused.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do you rate Sweden's new ceremonial sabers?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/NW2aOC4.jpg

      https://i.imgur.com/SLWumax.jpg

      >straight blade
      >slightly curved grip
      >laser etched blade decoration
      I like them if they're made out of a real steel and not just wallhanger grade slop. Also, I wish the decoration on the blade was engraved, but I get why they chose laser.
      6/10 as is, could be 8/10 if it is actually balanced and made of good steel with a correctly done temper.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They are handmade by German boomers in factory founded in 1560, they're about as far away from wallhangers as you can get.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          A lot of modern "Solingen" and "Toledo" blades are absolute dogshit. They've literally forgotten how to make good swords, or they don't give a shit to bother trying.

          [...]
          [...]
          >straight blade
          >slightly curved grip
          >laser etched blade decoration
          I like them if they're made out of a real steel and not just wallhanger grade slop. Also, I wish the decoration on the blade was engraved, but I get why they chose laser.
          6/10 as is, could be 8/10 if it is actually balanced and made of good steel with a correctly done temper.

          >straight blade
          >curved grip
          They're garbage

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >straight blade
            >curved grip
            >They're garbage
            Enlighten us why, great swordsman of /k/. People historically don't seem to agree with you but I bet you have a better handle on things.

            They have a skinny rat tail tang made from a lag bolt. The blade steel is unhardened and coated with a chromium top layer. They have no edge, and cannot be sharpened.

            They are simply man-israeliteelry, and break of you hit anything with resistance. Ask me how I know.

            >They have no edge, and cannot be sharpened.
            These are ceremonial weapons, of course they won't be made to have an edge lol. The Swedish Army expects to get a hundred years of use out of these blades, they aren't "wallhangers" by any stretch.
            >Ask me how I know.
            You've used a Swedish cavalry saber?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Toledo
            I hope you realize that's a city name, not a brand.
            The Real Fabrica de Toledo (the one who had been in existence for literally centuries, providing real good blades to the Spanish Army) closed down decades ago because, well, the Spanish army no longer fricking used swords for combat. SInce then, there are a LOT of wallhanger-makers in the city of Toledo that make well damn sure to ad the city name to their brand, to fool the likes of you who thought it was a brand like Solingen (which is too a city name, but is also a registered Designation of Origin in Germany, something Toledo is not in Spain.)
            I own one of the last swords made by the RFT before it clkosed down. Puerto Seguro sword-saber. Best cavalry sword ever made - right when nobody used them anymore. Such is life.
            (inb4 Britgays, Prusiangays and Pattongays claiming that their own straight, full guard, stiff, thrust-only swords are better; STFU, all of them are funtionally identical).

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Holy shit, R*dditor, of course I know it's a city and not a brand name.
              Nobody makes good Toledo swords these days. Just wall-hangers and other israeliteelry. My point stands.
              > Puerto Seguro sword-saber. Best cavalry sword ever made
              You are officially moronic.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >I hope you realize that's a city name, not a brand.
              Same with Solingen. Every cutlery maker in Germany moved there for marketing reasons.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          They have a skinny rat tail tang made from a lag bolt. The blade steel is unhardened and coated with a chromium top layer. They have no edge, and cannot be sharpened.

          They are simply man-israeliteelry, and break of you hit anything with resistance. Ask me how I know.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How do you know? Also, where do you buy genuinely nice swords?

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              NTA, but here's entry-level stuff as a starting point:
              > https://landsknechtemporium.com
              > https://www.arms-n-armor.com
              > https://albion-swords.com
              And about half of the stuff on:
              > https://www.kultofathena.com
              If you want to go beyond entry-level, generally what you do is commission a sword made to your specifications from an Eastern Euro smith. (Usually they're Czech or Polish.)
              For 17th-19th century sabres, smallswords, and other "modern" weapons, auctions are best. You can get a well-preserved antique for anywhere from $400-2000.
              > https://www.hermann-historica.de/en/auctions

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              NTA, but here's entry-level stuff as a starting point:
              > https://landsknechtemporium.com
              > https://www.arms-n-armor.com
              > https://albion-swords.com
              And about half of the stuff on:
              > https://www.kultofathena.com
              If you want to go beyond entry-level, generally what you do is commission a sword made to your specifications from an Eastern Euro smith. (Usually they're Czech or Polish.)
              For 17th-19th century sabres, smallswords, and other "modern" weapons, auctions are best. You can get a well-preserved antique for anywhere from $400-2000.
              > https://www.hermann-historica.de/en/auctions

              LK Chen makes good swords, with autist levels of obsessing over replicating the weight/balance/taper of the originals. They started with chinese museum pieces but branched out into european rapiers and sabers recently. Quite a few reviews on youtube.
              https://lkchensword.com/us-1860-cavalry-saber
              Yes, yes it's made in china but 70% of the modern sword market is made in china, up to the $5k range.
              Another option is specifically the new Windlass 1796 light cavalry sabre, since they had Matt Easton consult on the design and buy them an original antique to base the dimensions on.
              But the other anon is right, there's a large supply of antique napoleonic and onwards era swords to fulfill demand so good replicas are scarce

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Any recommendation for a left-hand friendly replica (symmetrical or custom) short sabre like

                https://i.imgur.com/rkP2mzj.jpg

                Axes while having some tool dual-use have the drawback that you can't use them for prisoner/crowd control, you can point a sword at someone and he usually won't try to grab it, it allows an intermediate level of both relatively harmless non-lethal and lethal deterrent unlike firearms.

                , Grenadier Sabre, Briquet, Hanger ? Not fond of using antiques for playing with.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I like them if they're made out of a real steel and not just wallhanger grade slop
        its funny because swords from the 1700s and later which is what these are modeled after were made of dogshit metal

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That's not exactly true.
          Besides, the grade of steel is only part of what makes a sword a weapon. There's also balance, distal taper, edge geometry, ergonomics, and other factors.
          Modern swords are made out of steel alloys that would seem almost magical to a 14th century warrior, but modern swords are usually very poorly designed and made. Current "Toledo" blades are fine examples of this -- they're barely fit to hang on a wall. And modern dress sabres are little more than israeliteelry. An 18th century antique is going to be a better fighting weapon, even being 250 years old.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >its funny because swords from the 1700s and later which is what these are modeled after were made of dogshit metal

          How should I reconcile this claim with the competing claim from HEMA practitioners that Euros are the only people who ever made good swords?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            We need to distinguish steel quality and heat treatment.
            Early industrial steel had quality issues due to the coal used for steel production, however the heat-treatment produced something quite resilient in spite of that.
            modern steel > medieval steel (wood coal fuel not adding anything bad to the material) > early industrial steel (stone-coal fuel of varying quality)
            Comparisons with Japanese stuff giving it a good early reputation are from this late time-frame, however awareness the superiority of the manufacturing process got Japanese to produce their military swords like European sabres. (e.g. look up Murata-to if interested)

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            By treating them the same as weebs who think the katana is the most wonderful cutting implement since the knapped stone hand axe.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/NW2aOC4.jpg

      >How do you rate Sweden's new ceremonial sabers?
      3/10 $89.99 on amazon.com shiny wall hanger. It's depressing how much more beautiful, elegant and tasteful antiques made by a guy with a file and a third grade education were.

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The pistol is the modern equivalent.

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The moment I became an NCO I became tempted to get an NCO saber. I resisted because that would be incredibly dorky.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >not getting something you genuinely wanted because other people will think you're dorky

      cuck

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I support tomahawks as well. Or war hammers.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      > war hammers
      > Never issued as a token of rank, anywhere.
      > Absolutely nothing to do with American culture.
      It has to be a bowie, a tomahawk, a cavalry sabre, a revolver, or a shotgun. Those are the archetypical American weapons.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        maces have been a symbol of high rank or nobility for ages in europe and turks did it too

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Those were small maces or scepters, not war hammers by any stretch.

          https://i.imgur.com/dKso0oB.jpg

          >straight blade
          >curved grip
          >They're garbage
          Enlighten us why, great swordsman of /k/. People historically don't seem to agree with you but I bet you have a better handle on things.
          [...]
          >They have no edge, and cannot be sharpened.
          These are ceremonial weapons, of course they won't be made to have an edge lol. The Swedish Army expects to get a hundred years of use out of these blades, they aren't "wallhangers" by any stretch.
          >Ask me how I know.
          You've used a Swedish cavalry saber?

          Swords with curved handles and straight blades were designed so that cavalrymen can easily "give point" from horseback.
          They're awkward in most other contexts, though. Put it like this: It's not fun to cut with them.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Swords with curved handles and straight blades were designed so that cavalrymen can easily "give point" from horseback
            No, simply fricking no. Curved handles were developed to improve thrust angles for stabbing without needing to bend and expose the wrist.

            >They're awkward in most other contexts, though
            No, you are.

            >Put it like this: It's not fun to cut with them.
            You're not supposed to cut with a sword you idiot, only uncivilized barbarians slash with their blades: True swordsman stab.

            I can smell how pasty, fat, and untrained you are, and every reply of "nuh uh" only increases the stench.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              > You're not supposed to cut with a sword you idiot, only uncivilized barbarians slash with their blades: True swordsman stab.
              > t. foil fencing gay.
              Absolutely disgusting.
              > redditspacing
              Also disgusting.
              > "N-no, simply fricking no. Curved handles were developed to improve thrust angles for stabbing without needing to bend and expose the wrist."
              You don't know what you're talking about. These weapons were for cavalry first, with performance as a dueling weapon barely a priority at all. As a cavalry weapon, the grip combined with the straight blade facilitates giving point, but makes the sword much less useful in most other contexts.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >muh thrusts
              gay
              >In quarrels of which the fair sex was the cause, or when defending his honour or avenging offence – the Italian would sneakily use his dagger, the Frenchman openly attack with a smallsword, and the
              Swede or the German or some other foreigner would thrust with his straight blade. The Pole, however, would use his sabre-armed hand on the head and the nose and the ears of his opponent, so that the arrogant lout would always carry a memento and a lesson on how to behave properly. This is why the Sarmatian despised the dagger, the smallsword appeared only for a while during the modern era and the reign of the Wettin dynasty, and even then only at court – and the straight blade came to us from Germany. But there was only one faithful karabela, which defended one's life and taught a lesson to all impudent men, and reminded that the face is there not just to look pretty, but to face up to the opponent with a weapon in hand

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >You're not supposed to cut with a sword you idiot, only uncivilized barbarians slash with their blades: True swordsman stab.
              19th century theorycel shit that was completely disconnected from reality.
              This book is full of real accounts from that era, from conflicts such as the Indian Mutiny. Those that were taught the "scientific, sophisticated and correct" way of fighting only with the point quickly realised that it was absolute horseshit.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                What I find really unforgivable about these "cavalry spits" is that people had made considerably better hilt designs for similar purposes centuries earlier. A cup-hilt allows you to perfectly align your blade to your forearm (by putting two fingers over the quillons), provides excellent hand protection and even aids with edge alignment in the cut (by putting one finger over).
                It's objectively the best hilt design and people just forgot it. If you look at sword design over time, it's pretty clear that swordsmanship and by consequence sword design declined in Europe starting roughly in the mid-17th century. By the mid-late 19th century they had gone full moron and even had to re-learn that you should keep your edges sharp if you expect to fight.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The problem with cup hilts and large basket hilts in general on horseback is that you have to be able to draw while riding at speed sometimes. In those cases an open D guard is going to be a lot easier to get a grip on than something with a ton of metal in the way of your hilt.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I support tomahawks as well. Or war hammers.

        Make gunstock war clubs great again.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >war hammers
        >Never issued as a token of rank, anywhere.
        Summon the elector counts.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I AM FRANZ. THEY WILL OBEY.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          make the hammer for each rank heavier than the last so you can't have a promotion until you get swole enough

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Axes while having some tool dual-use have the drawback that you can't use them for prisoner/crowd control, you can point a sword at someone and he usually won't try to grab it, it allows an intermediate level of both relatively harmless non-lethal and lethal deterrent unlike firearms.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >it allows an intermediate level of both relatively harmless non-lethal and lethal deterrent unlike firearms.
        That doesn't make any sense.

        A sword might be a visual deterrent, but you can't actually use the sword effectively in a non-lethal manner. It might as well be the same thing as brandishing a firearm at somebody. Historically the police cutlasses were issued more for night patrol or large scale public disturbances that were more dangerous than routine day-to-day operations.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >. It might as well be the same thing as brandishing a firearm at somebody.
          Force of a gun is binary, you pull the trigger or you don't, hearing damage be firing next to a face is nothing a civilian would factor into the own action.
          A stupid child certain you won't shoot can walk up to and touch your gun unfazed by any theoretical threat it poses. This isn't an option with a sword as long as it's sufficiently sharp. A bladed weapon creates self-inflicted wounds to the one advancing into it.
          .. alternatively bayonets, would also work though, but considering the length of modern rifles, they'd have to be short-swords/sword bayonets anyway for decent reach.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You can and it was a common practice in the medieval period to slap an opponent with the flat side of the blade first to demonstrate that you could have cut them and then put the edge to them only if they continued after. In some German cities during the late medieval early renaissance it was only considered attempted murder if you thrust at someone, where as a duel in which only cuts were exchanged was treated as a brawl.

          Yes this is a lot more dangerous than modern less lethal options but people also were more comfortable and familiar with death and dismemberment back then.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >In some German cities during the late medieval early renaissance it was only considered attempted murder if you thrust at someone, where as a duel in which only cuts were exchanged was treated as a brawl.
            Source?

            >Inb4 you say "it came to me in a dream"

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              It’s addressed in Joachim Meyers “kunst des fechtung”. I don’t have an exact citation but there’s a line that goes something like
              >“you can put the edge to your countrymen, but it is good and right to save the point for the foreigner”

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Its cool to see Germany was the opposite of France then. Lots of French duels were thrust only and you weren't allowed to cut unless you requested it before the duel started. Lots of officers trained in saber having too much of an advantage over untrained civilians so the civilians had to level the playing field.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                We’re really talking about two completely different time periods here. Those thrust centric duels you’re talking about were a result of the small sword which didn’t gain popularity until the 18th century whereas Joachim Meyer was wrote his treatise in the 16th century. You should also keep in mind that while Meyer was very adamant about swordsmen being taught to behave morally and chivalrously, his section on “rappier” (which was more similar to Italian cut & thrust sidesword) had a much stronger emphasis on dueling rather than sport. It included a lot of thrusts as well. He thought Germanics shouldn’t be killing each other but they still often did in private places.

                I should also mention that sideswords and rapiers were used in duels throughout pretty much the entirety of Western Europe during the renaissance with most places favoring thrust centric rapiers. This wasn’t just a French thing.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >This wasn’t just a French thing.
                I wasn't trying to claim that it was exclusively French but rather that the two locations differed, however, I see your point about it being two seprate time periods.

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Rate this beautiful c**t,
    RAAF officer sword make by windlass

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    plz issue southam officers with these

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    “Any officer who goes into action without his sword is improperly dressed.” - Jack Churchill (no relation to Winston)

  31. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mine's an 1833 Dragoon Saber.
    It's an attractive blade, but the blade geometry isn't the greatest.

  32. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have that exact sword replica and its truly a piece of shit.

  33. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not until they’re allowed a beard.

  34. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why stop at sabers?

  35. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    homie I'm from Yasothon province in Thailand
    because of the bad harvest I cannot feed myself or my family
    why should I care about white people playing dress up

  36. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    yeah

  37. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I would love a sword for my kit. Something half way between a proper sword and a machete. It's surprisingly hard to find.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The the indigenous peoples of Central and South America invented the machete after being inspired by the sabers of the Colonists. By the time the US military needed a knife to cut brush and fight with they started issuing the US Army’s LC-14-B machete, my problem with it is that its 22" blade is kind of short.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Honestly I think my best bet is just making it myself. I want it just a bit heavier than a machete and I don't like how machetes are wider at the tip usually.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Something half way between a proper sword and a machete
      You’re looking for a cutlass

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Something half way between a proper sword and a machete
      https://www.knifecenter.com/item/BYXKIFISH235/condor-baryonyx-knife-company-kingfisher-machete-1075-double-edge-blade-american-hickory-handle-no-sheath

  38. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    would be great for modern bayonet charges like in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Falklands.

    Imagine being some Houthi rebel thinking you have a british platoon surrounded after a long firefight when suddenly they all fix bayonets and charge your position and as you see them all bearing down on you screaming you see a junior officer holding a fricking sword in the air. Most of your fellow jihadis flee and you die when a posh baby faced guards officer who just finished a Classics degree at Oxford cleaves your skull open with an 1897 pattern officers sword

  39. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The military already does a fine job of giving soldiers too much shit to carry

  40. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Should I get this?

    https://www.kultofathena.com/product/hanwei-revolutionary-war-hanger/

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >https://www.kultofathena.com/product/hanwei-revolutionary-war-hanger/
      Yeah, it's okay.

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