Would a hollow channel in a swords fuller filled with liquid mercury really make it easier to raise and bring down?

Would a hollow channel in a swords fuller filled with liquid mercury really make it easier to raise and bring down?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    more material makes it harder to swing, faster sword better than heavy sword

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There's an upper limit to decreasing mass for increasing velocity. A baseball player cant swing a pencil at 1000 miles an hour.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Its a ceremonial executioners sword, its not supposed to be "swung" so much as "dropped", more guillotine than scimitar in function.

      https://i.imgur.com/LJQQaOa.jpeg

      Oh wait, it is actually a reference to it; never realized that

      sick reference. What game?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        exanima

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          the one that's been in early access for a decade? QRD? worth?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Honestly no, I think it's really fun but I know that the controls throw people and can make it frustrating; if you watch some gameplay videos and don't find it interesting then I wouldn't recommend

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              It's pretty much the only game where I can use a flail like an actual flail

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Terminus Est was built like this to make it easier to hold over your heard for an extended period of time making it more top heavy, I think that could kinda work. It would be at the expense of the blade integrity and in the book itself the blade does indeed break when used in actual combat.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >and in the book itself the blade does indeed break when used in actual combat.
      against an ultrasonic mace

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >easier to raise
    It would do the opposite
    >easier to bring down
    It should add some power

    Why tho? Metallurgically it seems infeasible. If you wanted this effect, just have an unsharpened ricasso that has some sort of shiftable weight that glides up and down. Still dumb, but is actually possible and does the same thing.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Metallurgically it seems infeasible
      in the future?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I was going off the post as stated, assuming a general case. I guess this is a Dune thing or something?

        Anyway the top end of swords hasn't changed much in hundreds of years. Steel is steel. If the casing is something super special then sure, although I still come back to 'why tho' as effectively all that has happened is the sword has been given more momentum, which you could do just by making it bigger which has other positives.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Steel is steel

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            OK. It is though. Mdern supersteels rarely offer much advantages for a sword and wouldn't make this easier anyway.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >as effectively all that has happened is the sword has been given more momentum
          it's an executioners sword, specifically used for decapitation
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executioner%27s_sword

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Frick off
    Heres a decent thread about blades, the only good one I have seen all week and it's slid to frick.

    [...]

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It would have more weight and momentum while you bring it down but a sword that changes balance mid swing doesn't sound practical

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure swords are already light enough, seems kinda redundant tbh

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No, there's no such thing as a free lunch in physics. If the guy raises the sword slowly before bringing the blade down then the mercury remains low in the sword, not providing any benefit at all. If the wielder raises the sword fast enough to sling the mercury out towards the tip that requires more energy from him on the upswing making the sword harder to raise compared to if he raised it more slowly. At that point it would act like a heavier sword coming down, but it also acted like a heavier sword coming up, so why not just make a heavier sword? Also, if the idea was to be some super powerful executioner blade then why not just make it huge? A 10lb sword would be absurd for a fighting weapon, but as a big choppy-choppy to sever some dude's neck? It would be fine for that. Same idea as a meat cleaver.
    This sounds like one of those situations where the author knows enough to think they're smart but didn't really think the whole thing through.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >This sounds like one of those situations where the author knows enough to think they're smart but didn't really think the whole thing through.
      The author was an industrial engineer.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >but it also acted like a heavier sword coming up,
      Go lift a 5 pound weight then lift a 5 pound weight on the end of a bat.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    feels impractical

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Oh wait, it is actually a reference to it; never realized that

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/VlGECJ5.jpeg

        feels impractical

        The description there does sound like Terminus Est, but Terminus Est was based on actual executioner's swords that were flat on the end instead of pointed.

        I was going off the post as stated, assuming a general case. I guess this is a Dune thing or something?

        Anyway the top end of swords hasn't changed much in hundreds of years. Steel is steel. If the casing is something super special then sure, although I still come back to 'why tho' as effectively all that has happened is the sword has been given more momentum, which you could do just by making it bigger which has other positives.

        Shadow Of The Torturer.
        Very good book.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Shadow Of The Torturer
          As much as I love The Knight and The Wizard I don't think I've read any of Gene Wolfe's other books. I'll check this one out.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Shadow Of The Torturer
          As much as I love The Knight and The Wizard I don't think I've read any of Gene Wolfe's other books. I'll check this one out.

          I'm three pages in, love it, and realize I need to read more as I've lost a bit of language skill.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think it matters. Terminus Est is a ceremonial sword anyway.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The mechanism would work in theory. But would be better served in the haft of a glaive in my opinion.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No. But rule of cool is more important for pulpy sci-fi/fantasy stuff.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    utterly moronic, youd have to do extra work slinging the mercury outward and there are pretty much only downsides
    you want something thats easy to raise that goes down with a lot of force, just changing grip on a long handle or handle+ricasso or a sword/polarm inbetweener (nagamaki and dadao come to mind) will do that
    its not cool either, or creative, really. coming up with something that is not historical but works is creative and i can think of a couple examples

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