Wolfhound has its first laser

Raytheon UK recently received its first HELWS unit from the US for testing in the UK. Since then, the vehicle engineering team at NP Aerospace’s Coventry facility have been leading the integration work, with mobility trials scheduled for later this year.

https://npaerospace.com/np-aerospace-progresses-raytheon-air-defence-integration-on-wolfhound

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Weird to think how much cheaper this will be per shot compared to conventional munitions like missiles. Obviously at the moment the technology is still very early, so there is a distinct first mover disadvantage for any weapons manufacturer who wants to create portable laser weapons at a price they can comfortably profit from, but it does bode well for the future.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I wonder if there's a future for cheap, small laser boats to screen fleets from a distance.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Laser components are really not that expensive anymore, you can find multiple KW lasers for a few hundred dollars with chink quality control, or a few thousand for an American system

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        chinese CW fiber lasers can be bought at 135kw.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Cheapness and logistic ease are the whole point behind lasers being used as weapons in spite of real life physics make it a b***h harder than your viyda.
      Energy doesn't have weight.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Have lasers already progressed in the sense that they don't need to illuminate a bogey like 15 seconds uninterrupted to intercept it? Because that's the advantage on missiles right now, you fire and move to the next target.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Raytheon has ballparked a typical HEL dwell time of 5-10s as recently as 2019.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >5-10s
          That is like 60s against a silvered surface without any cooling other than the airflow.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I am recalling a passing citation of a workshop talk from memory so don't make much of that number. Lemme track down the context.

            . . . a few minutes later . . .

            2020 COUNTER-DIRECTED ENERGY WEAPONS: DEFENSE OF AIR ASSETS
            https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/trecms/pdf/AD1114135.pdf

            this was also useful

            2012 COMPARISON OF HIGH ENERGY LASER EXPECTED DWELL TIMES AND PROBABILITY OF KILL FOR MISSION PLANNING SCENARIOS IN ACTUAL AND STANDARD ATMOSPHERES
            https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA557011.pdf

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Thanks for he AD's. AD1114135 also mentions
              https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/AD1053440.pdf
              Even so, I don't see any mention of something as common as a rotating object like a shell (far simpler than any jamming of the laser tracker) or cooled surfaces, only ablated (15 seconds).
              An old tech, X-ray tube have a rotating anode to spread the incredible intense heat in the focal spot (100 kw-1000 kw per sq mm, 2 order of magnitude better than a static anode).

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Rotating anything on a plane or drone is going to be difficult and heavy anon. But yes, cooling is possible. They could theoretically make use of modern variants of vapour chambers on small drones (liquid cooling) which are literally just flattened copper pipes filled with liquids with near evaporative tendencies (or at low pressures) that transfer heat pretty well to heatsinks (a large amount of water can absorb a ton of heat for instance and evaporate to take it away, or generic fins). Or a standard cryo-loop for generic refrigeration, combined with reflective surfaces and you can reduce the effectiveness of lazers, but they all increase cost substantially.

                As lasers become more effective (and they will) by networking together and combining beams, they will become more effective, smaller, networked and decentralised in terms of local placement, or at least that's how I expect to see it in 40 years. Drones will just have passive anti lazer defences like foil, and focus on numbers to overwhelm, and since dust kills lazers effectiveness at both seeing future targets and hitting them, even if they take out one drone, you only need to kick up dust and you can get closer with the next drone.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >dust
                Maybe some form of onboard chaff specially tailored to DEWs?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If you fly close enough to the ground honestly the dust picked up by the drone exploding during dry summer or arab conflicts will be enough for potentially up to a couple minutes even.
                But yes you could very well add some sort of smoke producing explosive conponent too.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Is the effect really that severe? People talk about being able to punch through any non-solid barriers between the emitter and the target.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                With a little bit of protection on top for sure.
                For a start optical based systems won't even see you either, but generally dust is the bane of these systems.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Wolfhound has its first laser
    holy frickin BASED
    INGLUND wins again

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Charger TANKS that btw

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >the Russians have invaded MY HOME PLANET

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ISLE OF THE BLESSED

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wasn't the test for dragonfire laser also mounted on a wolfhound?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Idk. It's been mounted to a wolfhound. The test footage that came out recently shows an indoor test in a lab, then an outdoor test at night from too far away to tell how the laser is set up.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Thinking about dem beams

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    God I love American company Raytheon technologies. They make the best missiles and lasers for US use and her ally’s

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      frick off

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