why there are such a limited info about both Chechen wars in English?.

why there are such a limited info about both Chechen wars in English?. For example battle at the village of Harsenoya were 35GRU operator were KIA, Aksay special forces captivity were 40GRU spetsnaz guys were captured or battle for the hill 1406 were Russian marines got heavy beating are practically unknown outside of Russia and there almost no English language sources about these events. Now there are countless OSINT, journalistic and historical works in Russian(most of them are pretty good quality btw) which are available on the net but how come many aspects of those wars become obscure in English speaking world?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Spetnsnaz are not a direct comparison to western SF. They are (variously) more akin to light Recce forces or raid focused light infantry. The majority of military spetnsnaz units were comprised of conscripts serving for 2 years.

    Also note that the Chechens were not a foreign country. The majority, and all it's leaders, had served in the the Soviet Army. They new exactly how the soviet army fought and were fighting on home turf. Additionally they didn't suffer from the total collapse in moral prolific in Russia in the immediate post soviet era.

    The story is really demoralised conscript light infantry lose to highly motivated defenders. Not super elite SF mega warriors lose to poor tribespeople. So it isn't a surprising story.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      An educated answer

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Spetznaz is just the Russian equivalent of the term "Special Forces" or "Special Operations". They can go from the local regiment's recon-sabotage detachment to the GRU Spetznaz who are actual compared to US Military SOCOM units.

      None of the people he mentioned are regular ground forces speznatz, you're a fricking tourist newbie who hasn't read enough of the literature. Frick off.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        well they look and act like aid focused light infantry

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You sound exactly like a Ukraine cheerleader new gay

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wasn't there a thread a while back with a similar theme (lack of sources/info in english) but on some kind of explosion in the same timeframe like 1990s?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because Chechnya was overall just another part of the massive quagmire that was 90’s Russia, which is an era all Russians from the Navalny simps to vatniks want to memoryhole entirely from how utterly shit it was. And given it was far away from what was going on in Moscow at the time, there was little global recognition for it since it was still a rather small and contained conflict, unlike the Yugoslav Wars which took up an entire chunk of a continent in some of the worst violence Europe saw post WW2 at the same time.

      You talking about the apartment bombings that were almost certainly conducted by the FSB? That Putin used to improve his popularity and start the Second Chechen War?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >why there are such a limited info about both Chechen wars in English?
    Be the change you wanna see.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you, I will now make up fake information on the chechen wars

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How did those tiny puny wars traumatize entire generations of the snow Black folk? The current war is like 50 times bigger in terms of land and losses, and yet they barely care.
    Explain this to me.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The war is far from over still
      I'm guessing what you see now is stress state inflicted apathy, trauma will comes after
      I doubt many have even survived to tell the tale with this war being far deadlier plus the civilian population is still huffing those war propaganda farts like mad

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >How did those tiny puny wars traumatize entire generations of the snow Black folk?
      1. people actually came back from it and could tell what happened
      2. the first chechen war wasn't censored in russia unlike the ukrainian war
      3. losing again so quickly after afghanistan straight up drove some people mad.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Puccia stronk
    and getting their asses kicked by their tiny neighbours does not go hand...
    in first chechen war they literally lost thousands of vehicles including lots of t80s

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      A hundred at most

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >A hundred at most
        official loses are much higher
        first battle of grozny ended with
        >62 tanks destroyed
        >163 other armored vehicles lost
        and that's only tanks and armoured vehicles counted

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's like a regular weekend in Ukraine

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            well, Chechnya is Armenia tier - landlocked 1+ million residents with tiny post soviet surplus army - Ukraine is huge in coparison

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So get to translating homosexual

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Read fangs of the lone wolf for some Chechen insurgent tactics and One soldier's war of the perspective of an average mobik(hint: it includes lots of beatings and misery).

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Noone cares unless US Marines are in it, and kicking ass. Are you new here?

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Chechen Wars are hard to understand if you didn’t grow up in the USSR and don’t understand the Soviet strategy of dealing with the Caucasian territories. It was basically a deadly but uninteresting domestic insurgency. It occurred during Russia’s weakest period since the collapse of the Russian Empire and the Russian Army was even less prepared for a conflict than they were in 2022, so they got their shit pushed in during the first war. Not very compelling stuff.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That and no one from either side was willing to allow documentation into English. Then Putin banned international media coverage of the second war.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There was a pasta on /k/ about 10 years back by some vatnig called Ramzes with an account of fighting in Chechnya, anyone have it?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why is it surprising that the informtion is hard to come by? Can't this be said for many recent wars that had such little involvement with the English-speaking world? Take the Yugoslavian wars for comparison - There might not have been major expeditionary forces from English speaking countries engaged in full-scale warfare, but there were many NATO and UN troops physically present during many critical junctures, to say nothing of the journalists who could travel there mostly unhindered and record whatever they liked within reason.
    Chechnya was essentially closed off from anything but the Russosphere. There were simply very few outside observers of the Chechen wars, meaning that we rely on what people with a good grasp of English AND Russian have chosen to translate.
    For example, since this is a weeb site: Do you have any idea of how much Japanese literature, TV, intrigue, mythology etc. remains untranslated? Nearly all of it, and we've had over a century of westerners studying and translating. We've not moved on much since Lafcadio Hearn first started translating ghost stories. Even hugely popular authors in the West like Natsume and Mishima have dozens of untranslated works.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is totally anecdotal but I've seen a steady interest in military circles over the Chechen Wars.
      It was the Russian Federation's biggest war prior to Ukraine, and in many ways very similar.
      I work a lot with Anti-Armor stuff, and the Ukraine War has been huge for getting people thinking about Anti-Armor, especially when employed in tandem with Guerilla tactics (Like what was seen in the first months of the war). Since Tanks were generally declining in use over the last several decades, let alone insurgents with modern anti-tank capabilities, the Chechen Wars still hold up as relevant to modern day fighting.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >why there are such a limited info about both Chechen wars in English?.
    It was actively censored in russia. There's still a huge backlog of stuff that needs translation.

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