Why don't they put anti-glare coatings on red dots?

It seems like a lot more people have astigmatisms these days. Everyone I know seems to have one anymore, and it negatively impacts their ability to use a red dot on their firearms. The most common solution is to get a good anti-glare coating on one's glasses to minimize or completely negate the effect. However, it seems that an anti-glare coating on the optic directly would make a lot of sense. Especially, as some people have an astigmatism, but don't have poor general eye sight, so they do not normally wear glasses.

Couldn't a built-in anti-glare coating just be directly applied to a red dot's glass to make it useable for someone with an astigmatism? Anti-glare coatings shouldn't effect those without an astigmatism, but could make a world of difference for those with one.
Do any manufacturers already do this? Why hasn't this become a more common thing the optics market if it would/does work?

>inb4 just get a prism

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Starburst checking in.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Buy a smaller MOA dot if you have a starburst. It's more expensive, but the Aimpoint PRO I got feels just fine. I know it's still 2 MOA, but on lower intensities it's just fine.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Smaller dot doesn't help much, nor does turning down the brightness (unless you turn it down so much that the dot is nearly invisible). What *does* fix the problem almost completely is a triangular "dot" such as was on the old trijicon reflex sights, meprolite's, and early leupold deltapoints.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          helped me, don't know what to tell you. try a holo maybe, never noticed anything with those.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    dont they already have that
    like its not called anti glare but all reddots have some degree of tinted coating applied to the glass that they need for the reddot to work

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Couldn't a built-in anti-glare coating just be directly applied to a red dot's glass to make it useable for someone with an astigmatism?
    No. People with astigmatism see a fricked-up red dot because their eyes are fricked up, an antiglare coating on the optic will do nothing to prevent the light of dot being distorted as it passes through the lens of their eye.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >lets put anti-reflective coating on the thing we need to reflect light
    >wait whered my dot go
    Anti-glare coatings aren't a magic fix either. I shoot all the time with prescription anti-glare sunglasses that help with my astigmatism, but it doesn't really help with red-dots all that much. Setting the dot to a lower brightness setting makes a world of difference and makes my starbusting way less...starbursty

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Idiot.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    from what i've seen for astigmatism-friendly pistol dots, it's the reticle that helps. an additional circle surrounding the center dot seems to alleviate it somewhat.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    fricking hate these threads, i could have gone my whole life without knowing that people with normal eyes don't see lights the same way until you Black folk pointed it out

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How is that possible? Even color is subjective between different people. We could have a dozen people and have them all look at the same paint sample. If we could somehow look inside their brains and see the color as each person perceives it then it will be different for everybody, even though they might all call it by the same name.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        color is subjective, but my misformed eyeball isn't

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Couldn't a built-in anti-glare coating just be directly applied to a red dot's glass to make it useable for someone with an astigmatism?
    Of course not. The problem lies in the shape of the person's eye. Anti-glare coatings can't change that.

    >The most common solution is to get a good anti-glare coating on one's glasses to minimize or completely negate the effect
    If that works it means you need new glasses, because the glare you're seeing is coming from your current ones, not the optic. A similar example would be how a car with a dirty or really old worn windshield distorts streetlights more than a nice clean one. Coatings can help reduce glare coming from imperfections in a scope or your eyeglasses if applied to them directly. It won't have any effect at all on the shape of your eye.

    T. dude with astigmatism.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've got astigmatism and it's not that bad. They're unmagnified optics for fast shooting I don't think it really matters if you don't see a perfect circle just get on with it.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I seem to recall that etched reticles dom't have this problem

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The problem is specific to light, no physical object has an issue. Problem there is you're moving to a magnified scope (even at "1x") that comes with all the magnified scope baggage, most notably limited eye relief and an eye box.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was at the NRA convention and looked through hundreds of optics a few weeks ago.

    EoTech looks like a 2000 tiny dots that form the reticle.

    Aimpoint red dots are the worst and look like a cluster of grapes, as do most others.

    I have not come across any pistol red dots that appear clear enough to use.

    The HaloSun 510 was clean for me, as was a their other similar rifle projection reticles. Surprisingly, the SIG Romeo 2 is usuable and appears clean for me. I stick to prisms like the 1x or 3x Primary Arms Cyclops, or older gen Swampfox prisims.

    If any starburst bros know of a pistol red dot that works, let me know. But, I think I've seen them all.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Buy Eotech

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The most common solution is to get a good anti-glare coating on one's glasses to minimize or completely negate the effect.
    100% absolutely not how astigmatism works, nor is this statement you made up even remotely feasible

    you need to be 18 or older to post here, noguns teenager talking out of his ass

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Starburst and two sided coma going up and down

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The glare you see with astigmatism doesn't happen in the optic, it happens when your eye processes the input.
    No amount of coatings on the optic will unfrick your eyes.

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