Why didn't you fuckers warn me?

>tfw got into reloading with a hand press
>turns out I enjoy it more than I do shooting
>so much so, that I have to begrudgingly force myself to shoot, just so that I have brass to reload
>buy gun in a new caliber, not to enjoy shooting it, but just to have another caliber to reload
>sold muh .22LR pistol because, can't (realistically) reload .22LR, feels wasteful to shoot
Nobody told me I would enjoy this little hand press so much, I can take it anywhere, prepare brass in my car on my lunch break, doesn't require hearing protection to use unlike a gun, etc...

Yeah. Thanks for reading my blog. I'm sure one of you has felt something like this.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    U should get a suppressor or five and get into loading subs.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I have one but only for .22lr. Which directly conflicts with the whole thing

      Will get a 308 win soon though. I already loaded some 245 gr subs, the bullets were designed for .300blk but still stabilize fine in 1/10 twist .308

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I've got a Banish 46 in ATF jail, but 576 grain subsonics are on the to-do list for me.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          How long have you been waiting for your Vanish?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Only a month. I'm probably not getting it until (at best) march. In the mean time I'm going to order a sparrow 22 and something (I'm not sure yet) in 9mm.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >March
              >for a suppressor
              Even E-Forms are racking up time now anon, I would just forget you bought it and wait for the email or letter from the ATF
              >t. 357 day wait

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Eforms actually have a touch of hope kinda right now. After months and months of eternal February and waits creeping up more than a day for every passing day, it's leveled out around 224 days, and suddenly it's gone from 3/1 approvals to initial 3/11 approvals quick. Yeah with some poor bastards stuck in hell, but still. Maybe the hopes about things getting a bit better when the Feb slog was done will prove correct, though 90d still isn't happening.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Hopefully, maybe I'll set up a second tax stamp through eforms and see which one finishes first.
                >inb4 SC says suppressors aren't NFA

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                fug... I'm sitting at 218 days... someone needs to go into the treasury dept and flip some tables...

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Long ass wait, but a fantastic time of year to get access to a suppressor

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          There's a guy on YT (full lead taco) shooting subsonic 600gr 45-70 out of a suppressed 12inch single shot.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You also seem to own a laser cutter, what you got

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I do not. That's how bullets come from ACME bullet company.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >ACME
              Never heard of them, thanks again anon. Any other good companies you'd recommend?
              >already using MBC and Berry's for plated bullets

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >beep beep

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Not him but Eggleston is a good one, and Hoosier Bullets. Both are great

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You are welcome. And I guess it depends on what you are shooting. I've had good luck with accurate molds, use them for my 1876 and snider.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Half the reason I got into reloading was so I could affordably shoot 300BLK subs. Listen to this guy he is right

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty common to enjoy the building of the thing more than the thing. Things I've repaired, then sold without seriously using
    > guitars, go karts, bikes, motorcycles,
    I just enjoy fixing things more than I enjoy using them.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This
      True for many famous car/plane constructors

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just started this month with a hand press as well. Love it. Going to sell my non-edc semi auto pistols and replace them with revolvers because I hate picking up brass. I got a caldwell mag catcher for my ARs so I'll keep those.

    Currently loading .223/.38spc/.357 mag/.44 mag. Probably going to go full autistic and start making precision 6.5 creedmore loads.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Going to sell my non-edc semi auto pistols and replace them with revolvers because I hate picking up brass
      I'm going to get my first handgun soon but I really don't know if I should get a pistol or a revolver. I prefer shooting pistols and think they're cooler but on the other hand I want to get into reloading and think I might regret not getting a revolver
      >inb4 get both
      I'm a poorfag

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If you really want to get into reloading and it's a big concern, go with a 4" k-frame .357 magnum or equivalent and shoot mostly .38 spl +p type ammunition through it. It'll work well enough as everything from a CC gun you can fit in a big pocket to a pouch and still be comfortable as a bench rest/target shooting gun. I'm super into handloading and love my model 19, it's a marvelous platform to shoot and reload for. You could also consider one of those really cool L frame .44 mag revolvers, the model 69's, those are pretty neat and a really cool range and carry gun, but only really useful if you reload for them and have a decent source of tailored ammunition for different purposes.

        If you aren't super committed to getting into handloading, get an autoloader. I'm a massive revolver nut, and I'll tell you that autoloaders make way better platforms for doing everything with one gun if you don't get super autistic about everything. You can get little pocket revolvers that are really great CC guns, you can get giant big irons that'll blow away a deer at 100 yards, you can get a super solid target wheelgun that'll shoot as naturally as you can point your arm, but they're all mostly individually specialized. Can I mostly do everything with my model 19 with a little work? Hell yes. Do I love that gun? Hell yes. But I do that because I'm really committed to the platform. If you're just getting in and don't want to be a huge nerd like me, it'll be way easier to do everything with one of the many compact pistols that are commonly and widely available. It's really going to come down to your personal assessment of whether you think you'll enjoy the science and art of handloading, and the discipline of shooting, enough to justify the inconvenience of needing to do everything yourself and practice reloading with a speed loader or speed strip, or if you just want to buy off the shelf ammo and carry an autoloader with one magazine in the gun and maybe one in your pocket.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Carrying is not an option for me (yuropoor), so it would be a range toy only. But somehow all the revolvers I shot felt pretty bad in my hands, like the grips just sucked. I have larger hands than average, but for some reason I don't have the same issue when it comes to pistols.

          I think if I were to get a revolver, it would be a 6" .357 magnum. That way I could load .38 wadcutter rounds or some hotter .357.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Try to see if you can find an old Smith wearing the old school cokebottle/target style grips (see pic related). Many really old revolvers, especially the European ones, used super thin grips, and many modern ones have compact grips for concealment. I'm a canuck, the Model 19 I mentioned has a 6" barrel and is legally only allowed to be used for target shooting at a registered range. I have a hard time missing and can consistently shoot some pretty stout loads out of it even though it's supposedly a "lighter" framed revolver. I have some pretty big meat mittens, but those big target grips fit perfectly in my hand. If you're going for a pure range toy, I'd recommend a S&W 586, 686, or Ruger GP100.

            If you aren't really committed to a cool revolver and easy brass retention for reloading, or you still don't like the grips, a full sized, metal framed autoloader like a CZ 75 or a 9mm 1911/2011 might be more practical. Ammo is generally easier to find for autoloaders over here, but I don't know what it's like in European gun stores right now.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Thanks for the tips, I'll check those models out.

              We tend to have fewer ammo shortages over here, simply because it's not as fast to get a license, so we don't have panic buyers cleaning out the shelves. But ammo has become more expensive over the last few years (9mm is 50% or so).

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                *9mm is up 50% or so

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If you can't find any of those, keep an eye out for stuff like a model 10,13,15, etc. Any K or L framed S&W is nice in my opinion, you could even go up to an N frame if you're strong enough to hold it up. If you want something bigger, though it might not be as practical, maybe a .44 would be to your liking. The .44 mag and .357 mag can chamber the .44 special and .38 special respectively, they're the same cartridges but shorter and lower pressure for lower recoil, very good choices for target guns. If you can find .44 components, you might really enjoy shooting one as your target gun. If you see a used smith without a lock above the cylinder release, it's automatically way more collectable so keep an eye out. Berretta, CZ, or any brand of 1911 are probably your go-to autoloaders if you can't find a wheel gun that satisfies you.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/3CF8rfZ.jpg

      >hand press
      Got mine on discount last year. I was told it's kinda shit and inefficient but I love it. I can bring my entire setup anywhere any time

      A bench grinder stand works great.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I remember when harbor freight sold a "small workbench" with a 16"x20" top for $20. I fit my Lee turret press, case trimmer and still have enough to space to have plastic trays on it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Fug that would work great with my shitty lack of space.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/3CF8rfZ.jpg

      >hand press
      Got mine on discount last year. I was told it's kinda shit and inefficient but I love it. I can bring my entire setup anywhere any time

      Questions to all the hand press bros
      >how many rounds per hour are you able to reload?
      >what else besides the hand press kit would i need to buy? dices, scale, hand primer, powder measure, bullet tray. anything else?
      I live in small apartment and reloading setup that can fit in toolbox would be nice. Other idea would be getting the value turret set and mounting it like pic related.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I couldn't tell you 2bh. I only reload for my Vetterli because ammo doesn't exist otherwise, and I only have 25 casings for it.
        My hand press came with the primer tool, aside from that die set, scale, powder measure of some kind, everything else optional

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Once you get your dies dialed in, you could easily do 50-100/hour. I just reload for the fun of it, not really for volume. If you want to fire thousands of rounds on the weekend, you'll want a progressive.

        >what else besides the hand press kit would i need to buy? dices, scale, hand primer, powder measure, bullet tray. anything else?

        Get a quality caliper and a dry or wet tumbler. If you're reloading rifle ammo, you'll need a case trimmer, deburring, and chamfer tool, lube (imperial sizing wax is what I use), and a tool to remove crimped primer pockets from .223 and .308.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >hand press
    Got mine on discount last year. I was told it's kinda shit and inefficient but I love it. I can bring my entire setup anywhere any time

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/vBjtlRf.jpg

      Just started this month with a hand press as well. Love it. Going to sell my non-edc semi auto pistols and replace them with revolvers because I hate picking up brass. I got a caldwell mag catcher for my ARs so I'll keep those.

      Currently loading .223/.38spc/.357 mag/.44 mag. Probably going to go full autistic and start making precision 6.5 creedmore loads.

      The Lee Hand Press was my first (gift from the guy who also taught me shooting), but if you have the space, a bench mounted press just requires much less force, especially on rifle cases.

      https://i.imgur.com/vgR2726.jpg

      Any tips for hand loading revolvers? Specifically on if I need to bother to slug the barrel or not. I tried looking on different forums but it seems like I get different answers.

      No need to measure your barrel if it's a modern gun of known caliber.
      Slugging the barrel is only needed when you don't know the exact caliber.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >force myself to shoot for brace
    You're missing the point of reloading. You load up like 10 of a specific load for a specific gun, do 10 variations. That's 100 rounds. You go and test them. You're chasing the perfect round for your gun. The one that gives you 1/4 MOA. This elevates your shooting more than anything else. Now, you have to be able to take your errors out of the equation. You end up buying a chronograph. You buy a leveling set and anti-cant levels for your gun. You get the best bipod. You're at the range the same day every week with the old men. Who can get the best group at 100 yards? 600 yards?

    Loading without testing your rounds is like sexless masturbation without even an ejaculation as release.

    Have you measured your ideal OAL for engaging the lands properly in your rifle? What are you even doing?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sorry anon, but for now just enjoying the reloading bit, I'm sure I'll get there eventually. That sounds cool.
      >measuring the lands
      No but I am trying loading the bullet super long, trying to chamber it, and if it doesn't fit, turning my dies a quarter turn, reseating until it's just behind the lands...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Firstly, I can't believe I typed brace, what an idiot I am.

        Okay,
        Put a bit of red loctite in the throat of an empty case, the ones you'll be using.
        Put your projectile in the case, such that it's not all the way in but the loctite isn't going to come out all over the place.
        Chamber the round using your bolt action.
        Let it sit that way drying for 20 minutes.
        Extract the round.
        This gives you the ideal seating depth for that cartridge and projectile in that gun.
        Measure it's OAL with calipers.
        Use that.

        Reloading is only interesting for chasing insane accuracy. Other it's just work.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Neat trick anon, I actually tried something like this but instead of locktite, I just lightly crimped the neck, the thinking was that I'd gently use the lands to seat the bullet to perfect length... the bullet got stuck when I extracted the round.
          You're a damn genius.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >You're a damn genius.
            I'd like to take credit but actually saw it on youtube. It seemed like the best method.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I do this but with Elmer's glue so I can more easily pull and reuse the bullet and brass

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I haven't started reloading yet but according to this guy on garden gnometube that's not necessarily the best seating depth. you are supposed to start with that number or like .020 shorrter and then back off a few thousandths at a time until you find at least 2 small groups in a row.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            How about you start reloading them champ?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I will as soon as I can set up a bench and stuff. should I really just start with a cheap single stage or is it better to buy an expensive setup to save money in the long run?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Single stage to start off with, understand your fundamentals and figure out what you load the most, ect. Then consider moving up to a turret/progressive setup.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                but even for single stage should I get a fancy one like a forster coax? I don't mind spending more if it's going to be something I will keep using. on the other hand I don't want to buy something cheap that I will just end up replacing later.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                get something solid that'll last a while like a rcbs rockchucker or Lee classic cast, it'll handle a variety of loadings and ultimately if you're looking for precision a single stage press is considered the way to go.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Anon, you should be a process engineer at a manufacturing plant if not already

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw reading this thread when I've never had a genuine interest in reloading, would probably be just another chore I have to deal with and I'd end up hating, and I'm too retarded anyway and would probably blow my gun up
    I hate this board sometimes, this thread is like being a cripple watching children play in the park

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Don't paint it all black.
      It's not like a cripple watching kids playing but more like the time I nearly had to reanimate an old guy because he saw a a rare af bird he was searching for years and excitement got the better of his heart.
      Different folks different stuff one enjoys.
      I get a boner for reaaaaaal tight groups but reloading itself is so tiresome.
      I should team up with OP

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        OP here, am a silhouette/steel guy. (That white spec on the right is my 18" gong at 600 yards).

        Luckily unlike you I don't find reloading tiresome... I'll try it your way and you can try it mine

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Unfortunately I can only shoot up to 300 without driving a lot. Lucky you.
          I always wanted a 338 mag precision rifle but at 300 that's BS and my only other justification went up in smoke together with the Russian ammo depots lol.
          You should try muzzleloaders. A lot more "working" per shot

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >muzzleloaders
            Looking at the SSK mongrel, coming out q1 next year. Not "fully" a muzzleloader, you load the bullet by itself from the muzzle, and then load what are essentially blanks in the chamber

            I do shoot 45-70 black powder though, that's plenty old fashioned for me

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Let me guess: This abomination is the byproduct of some BS burger legislation regarding hunting seasons?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yes and no.
                Most people use muzzleloaders because they have a hunting season a week earlier than guns.

                BUT, muzzleloaders are (usually) able to be owned by felons, and you can ship them to your door with no background check or paperwork. So many people like them for that reason.

                This makes them immune from federal regulations. You could make a full-auto muzzleloader with no paperwork and it would be perfectly legal.

                Also, why not? They're cool I guess

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                No paperwork ok, felon ok but the hunting season part I'll never understand.

                Hunters get privileges for choosing a "harder" way of hunting and than try to use any technical means to make it as easy as possible.
                That's bullshit. No struggle no growth.
                Muzzleloading season: muzzleloading rifle with open sights. Bow season Recurve bow or better handmade primitive bow. Handgun season: Pistol or Revolver not some 10" Contender
                All of this forces you to get closer to the prey and know when not to risk a shot.

                It's like buying an E-Bike just because some hills are making one sweat.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                the deer don't belong to the government, all game rules are bullshit anyway, so might as well find every loophole possible

                I take it you're not american so this concept might be unfamiliar

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I'm all for shitting on your government when they're being tyrannical gobshites, but the majority of game laws are about making sure retards don't wipe out the entire population, dipshit. It's nothing to do with the government thinking they own the deer, the simple fact is that if you hunt them out of season you'll completely fuck their ability to procreate, because pregnant deer will reabsorb fetuses if stressed out, does will abandon young if they don't think they can get to them safely, and putting pressure on them all year round will run them into the ground.

                It's the same logic with hitting upland birds at that same time, and migratory waterfowl also happen to be most resilient to hunting pressures when their young are grown and they're packing up and fucking off elsewhere.

                The reason there are muzzle loading/bow seasons before gun season is because there's fewer hunters willing to put in the effort, and those hunters will be less successful due to how much more difficult it is to hunt using those methods. It allows for an extended hunting season that hits earlier in the rut, without putting undue extra pressure on the deer trying to fuck.

                The fact that you can't understand the basic biology of your prey and the reasons why your hunting practices need to be adapted to that biology says a lot about how much of an actual hunter you are. Just because the majority of policy makers should be doing a rope jig doesn't mean every policy is evil, just that policies need to be better assessed by people that are a) informed on the issue, and b) actually have the interests of the people in mind.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Very based.

                Also, a lot of hunting equipment restrictions are for human safety as well as game population persistence.

                I live in the most gun friendly state in the union and there's still a fair number of shotgun and muzzleloader only zones. The guys working for state game agencies usually hate gun laws too. The laws in effect aren't about infringement, they are about public safety during an activity where multiple unvetted people in a state of excitement will be firing weapons at moving targets in and around areas of high population density.

                As a society we value the safety of a family eating dinner more than the satisfaction of some gear queer neckbeard who can't be trusted to not use that family's suburban home as a backstop the first time he ever sees sunlight or a deer.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Full-auto muzzleloader
                I for one would love to see how this works.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You just need more barrels

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Think big Roman candle.
                https://www.forgottenweapons.com/chambers-flintlock-machine-gun-from-the-1700s/

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Theres an endless ongoing trend to make "Muzzle Loading Rifles" that are closer and closer to being just an ordinary single shot rifle, not due to changing laws but due to people getting lazier and wanting an easier time during Muzzleloader deer deer season. Basically companies pushing the technical definition as far as they can to sell new guns to lazy people who cant be bothered to use a traditional caplock rifle. First it was break action and bolt in-lines and then it was electrically fired guns and now its guns the load the primer and charge is a polymer shell in the breech and then stuff a bullet down the barrel, with a retaining ring seating them and prevent plain old breech loading.

                So yes, its about technicalities of a hunting season but its not the seasons that are changing just how much effort people go to in getting around the spirit of the season

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Thanks for the explanation. I do not follow the muzzleloading market in the US.

                the deer don't belong to the government, all game rules are bullshit anyway, so might as well find every loophole possible

                I take it you're not american so this concept might be unfamiliar

                Yeah I'm German. We have a very different mindset. For example a lot of Americans use the word "harvest" when they kill a deer. In German harvest can only apply to grains and vegetables. When I shoot a boar, I "erlege" it = put it to rest.
                German hunting is more about tradition, hunting ethical, elitism and companionship. So yes two worlds.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I envy German hunting so much, you made the best guns for it too. I watch WiederladerTV on youtube a lot.

                I do hear the license for hunting is very expensive.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I paid about 2,3k €/$ for it.
                A lot of gatekeeping because we are so densely populated.
                There are bad parts in our hunting culture too. For example the rampant abuse of alcohol or the lack of training of most shooters.
                You can pick the best parts from it and apply where you live.
                For example the rite of the last bite is so archaic and still makes sense fundamentally

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >the rite of the last bite
                QRD?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                IIRC that's where you put something in the mouth of an animal you hunt. Deer get young branches they'd normally eat for example. An example that you'd know for sure is the obligatory "apple in mouth of pig on a spit over a fire". Germans do this with their deer and pigs IIRC, not so sure about their smaller game like rabbits. But I'm sure he'll chime in and let us both know.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                https://i.imgur.com/CnkUoys.jpg

                IIRC that's where you put something in the mouth of an animal you hunt. Deer get young branches they'd normally eat for example. An example that you'd know for sure is the obligatory "apple in mouth of pig on a spit over a fire". Germans do this with their deer and pigs IIRC, not so sure about their smaller game like rabbits. But I'm sure he'll chime in and let us both know.

                Yeah you remembered it correctly. Although the apple in the pigs mouth is just part of a recipe.

                It's an archaic rite to ask the spirit of the animal for forgiveness because you took his life in order to prolong your own.
                Rites like that are part of humanity for far longer than scripture, it does two things:
                1) increases the empathy for the dead animal ( Which prevents seeing it as a pest)
                2) "absolves the sin" of killing it.
                Sounds dumb but works psychologically

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Completely forgot about this until you replied; are there guidelines on what food to use? Are you putting, say, a branch/grass in the mouth of a deer and a walnut in the mouth of a squirrel or is something not specified?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Allowed are branches from: Fir, spruce, pine, oak and alder
                If none of the above can be found, pick whatever is at hand.
                Squirrel is not hunted in Germany. Our squirrels are scrawny compared to their American cousins and way too good looking with their red fur.

                There's one other aspect I just thought of as well. By taking part in a ritual that builds empathy, it's going to reduce the urge to depopulate the animal population needlessly.
                Let's face it, we've got an awful lot of people who shoot any squirrel/dove/snake/fuckever they see. In an older civilization, this might very well ruin your local ecosystem if enough people do it and force your nomadic tribe or whatever to move on earlier than they should.
                Though even from a modern moral perspective, despoiling the land needlessly is wrong.

                That's a modern approach as our ancestors most of the time didn't give a single fuck about population management and "ecological" hunting.
                See all those "jump hunt" sites in Europe.
                Basically you get a herd of animals and force them to run away from your groop over a deep ravine and they all fall to their death. Boom more meat than your tribe can eat

                See hunting by

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                TY anon. We also have red squirrels over here. They don't have much meat, but they're in season when the grey and fox squirrels are in season and they're pretty. Nice pelts. I'm slowly getting better at taxidermy; I've had a couple years to improve. I should probably order some foam forms and experiment with making some clones of them to lower cost per squirrel. Much easier to do taxidermy using premade forms.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                There's one other aspect I just thought of as well. By taking part in a ritual that builds empathy, it's going to reduce the urge to depopulate the animal population needlessly.
                Let's face it, we've got an awful lot of people who shoot any squirrel/dove/snake/fuckever they see. In an older civilization, this might very well ruin your local ecosystem if enough people do it and force your nomadic tribe or whatever to move on earlier than they should.
                Though even from a modern moral perspective, despoiling the land needlessly is wrong.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >lack of training of most shooters
                You have to pass a shooting test to get your hunting license, that's a stricter requirement than in many other countries

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah more than most and still not strict enough in my book.
                Hitting 2/5 shots on the boar und 3 on the deer target is less than mediocre.
                You want to kill a living being, less than 4 Moa @100 shooting from a rest is unacceptable to me. Add stress and the climate and 4 Moa become 10.
                And than you to do Nachsuche.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              why does it have an arm brace if it's legally not a firearm?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Are primers still hard to find? Been working through my stockpile and just curious if they are still unobtanium.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Hard? No. They just cost a fuck ton more and online stores usually have limits, making the hazmat shipping not worth it. Some stores have either lifted limits of unkown brands, which was actually enforcing minimum purchases. The prices is still terrible, but at least you can fully utilize the hazmat shipping fee.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Tons of the, but my local shops want $135/1000. Fuck that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They're hard to find locally, but available online. Even sellers at gun shows are starting to run out now, and the last store I've seen with primers other than shotgun primers locally had a 1 tray purchase limit. As far as I can tell, about 10c is a good price now.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's because of threads like this that prompted me to get the supplies and tools for some reloading for my SMLE, but I can't find large rifles primers anywhere. I'll join you someday reloading bros.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Im very retarded and I want to reload 9mm as a start. What the fuck should I do?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >buy pic related
      >3$ rubber mallet from harbor freight
      >any good pistol powder you can find
      >no need to buy a loading manual, can all be found online
      >order some plated bullets from Berry's for cheap
      That's all you need, save for primers... I can't help you with those. Maybe trade a 6 pack to your hand loading friend for a sleeve of 100.

      Don't listen to the people who say you need more as a starter. This will teach you all the fundamentals and you will want to keep it anyway.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This is incredible and I should probably get one of lee hand prime loaders since that seems a hell of a lot safer

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          There is no danger of priming on this thing...

          ...as long as you use a hard surface. I tried it on a carpet (to keep noise down) and the bouncing caused me to pop 2 primers out of 40.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Based, I have one for .45 colt. Haven't moved on from black powder yet but then again I need to get an actual revolver first.
        I was thinking of getting a peacemaker for max cowboy rooty shooty but I'm also looking at more modern guns. Maybe something in .454 casull if I ever feel like loading that too. Maybe double action.
        If anyone has any suggestions I'd like to hear them. It's a fun gun so practicality won't be a factor.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've always wanted to get into reloading so I could reload brass case shotgun ammo while drinking and pretending to be a demon/vampire hunter reloading shells with silver.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I would advise against reloading and drinking but I strongly advise making anti-vampire rounds.

      >t. friend made custom load 357 with silver casted bullets and brass blessed by his local priest.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i look forward to your blog update when you realize what a pain in the ass that little cuckpress is for real cartridges not just little cuck straightwall pistol rounds

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ok noodle arms

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I want to do this set me up with a list of everything I need, and on the cheap.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      seconded please tell anon; I wanted to try that too (bump)

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/t4Zq1dD.jpg

        I want to do this set me up with a list of everything I need, and on the cheap.

        I've done it. It's tough to get the crimp right on a cut case, however long you think you need it, make it shorter because the powder won't light unless the crimp is strong enough to build up enough pressure.
        Otherwise it works fine.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      seconded please tell anon; I wanted to try that too (bump)

      I'd recommend you guys use a Lee Load-All to do your sizing/(de)priming/crimping operations, but it's not completely necessary:

      Here's a kit that does most of what you want without a press:

      You can make most of this stuff yourself, as this guy did:

      For making slug shells out of birdshot shells, you can either use the wax slug method or cast new slugs. I will warn you, wax slugs aren't very accurate beyond point blank range and the key-drive slugs made by most slug molds have a hit-or-miss reputation where they'll either work very nicely with your gun and donor shells or it'll print like a monkey with an uzi, no in between. You can get molds for the Russian "Fire Hydrent" or "Shuttlecock" style slugs, but those require special wads you'll need to buy that are kind of expensive. Wax slugs, if shot in volume, can also foul up your barrel to the point where a slug gets stuck and pipe bombs your barrel, or they can slip out of the shell and cause a "short start".

      Wax slug videos:

      Slug casting:

      https://youtu.be/61w2nhFMa6c
      https://youtu.be/Y4_y4Qy8g0o
      https://youtu.be/4FnzSF3G9OU

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i wanna bo bullets not shottys.

        I need a list for loading .45 and 9x18

        And cheap.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You posted a box of shotshells, a lee keydrive slug mold, a shotshell roll crimper, and a picture of a bunch of shotgun slugs. Forgive me for writing out an entire guide to finding videos on handloading shotgun slugs.

          Get a reloading press, if you aren't super committed to high volumes and just want to make a box or two every day or so, then get either a single stage or a basic progressive like the lee starter sets come with. You'll also need a die set, preferably a carbide four die set, a way to prime your cases (I prefer the lee safety prime that attaches to my press, but if you want to use a hand primer or something go for it), a powder throw, and a powder scale. handgun cases don't really need trimming unless you get some big discrepancies, so don't really worry about that until later. You can find loads of data online, especially at https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/

          Here's a video on basic handgun reloading:

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous
          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I forgot to mention you'll need a loading block, but you can either buy one or just get a block of wood and drill a bunch of the right sized holes in it.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I still have no idea what the difference between a turret press and a progressive press is.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      seriously guys can someone please explain what's the difference between a turret and progressive press? Can I start off on a turret press?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think a turret press has a turret that you can spin around with different stations for resizing, seating, etc. a progressive press is the same but every time you pull the lever it activates each station.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Single stage: one shell station, one die. Must swap your die for ever step.

        Turret: One shell station, 3-4 dies. Instead of swapping the die, you manually rotate the turret to the next die. This allows you to not have to mess with dies as much, but you still are only loading one round at a time.

        Semi-progressive: 3-4 shell station, 3-4 dies. Now you no longer have to mess with changing dies AND you process multiple shells at once. But you still probably have to feed bullets, feed brass, and/or charge powder (just like all previous stations).

        Fully progressive: like semi, but your cases automatically feed, and your powder automatically charges, and primers automatically prime. As long as your brass/primer/powder feeder are charged, you get truly "one round for every pull of the lever".

        Just get a single stage with quick change. Even if you decide to upgrade later on, it will still be useful to you.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          thanks fren

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          A lot of turret presses will rotate the dies automatically. The experience is completely different from and much faster than a single stage press. You perform all the steps for reloading a single piece of brass before moving to the next piece of brass rather than performing a single step on all of the brass before moving to the next step.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You're right, I confused myself.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not alot. Pretty much only the Lees. Waste of time too as it's much more efficient to simply run each stage in batches.
            Since quick change bushings became popular there is no real point to turret presses.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Waste of time too as it's much more efficient to simply run each stage in batches.
              In what world is constantly removing and replacing pieces of brass after a single step more efficient than loading a single piece of brass and pulling the lever 4 times and working your primer feeder/throwing a bullet on at the appropriate step? I can easily do 200 rounds/hour on my turret press. Only charging a single case with powder at a time rather than doing a batch at a time also massively reduces your chance of a double charge.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                By loading in batches you're only doing one thing at a time. Easier to do and faster as you aren't switching between tasks.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Fuck off retard.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >what is handling time
              Turret pretty much doubles my output/h over single stage

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Im getting an AR in 350, very interested in reloading it, otherwise might pickup a 30-30 lever gat, in which case I might reload that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      U should post about how it goes. I've got a 12.5" pistol in 350 and am thinking about loading for it too.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Nothing wrong with being a logistics guy, OP. You're an uncommon breed.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Has anyone ever thought of downgrading to a hand press? I'm starting to question having a dedicated reloading bench with a press bolted to it with how much less I I've been reloading as this shortage has gone on.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not a fan of that image, my guy. How the fuck do you even fuck up that badly? I've taken some little chunks out of my fingers catching them between a case mouth and the die, but never more than a little pinch or cut. This guy pushed it through BONE. Holy shit.

      As for the actual substance of your post, I'm pretty happy with my challenger press. What I'd recommend if you have a bench mounted press and powder throw is to do as I have done, and mount them to pieces of HDF or MDF. Just cut them to about 8"x12", drill holes for the bolts on the piece for the press and pilot holes for the screws on the powder throw piece, and then drill reliefes on the underside of the press piece for the bolt heads. Then you can attach them to the boards and clamp the bords to any work bench or solid table. I keep my press on the corner with two clamps, one on the inner near corner and one on the outer far corner, and the powder throw just needs one clamp on the inner edge. Taking them down and setting them up takes less than a minute.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      imagine the meat in that shell

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        How many grains is that?

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Glad you're having fun anon, I wish I can join you, but I can't find any large pistol primers for my 44-40 brass casings. (I'm not dealing with the hazmat shipping aids)

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Are primers available anywhere? My dad bought a Dillon progressive press in 2020 that has been collecting dust, literally, ever since he bought it, cause he can’t find primers anywhere, but is dying to start reloading.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      See:

      They're hard to find locally, but available online. Even sellers at gun shows are starting to run out now, and the last store I've seen with primers other than shotgun primers locally had a 1 tray purchase limit. As far as I can tell, about 10c is a good price now.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I would imagine loading batches of 200 rounds on a handpress gets boring pretty quickly, no?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah. I use it for rare ammo that I reload 10, maybe 20 max at a time but I wouldn't want to reload tons of .308 or 9mm with it

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This entire thread enjoys This Old Tony.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >5.7 is too expensive
    >look into reloading 5.7
    >borderline impossible and incredibly easy to fuck up and blow up your gun unless you have a lot of experience reloading
    >need to be careful not to strip the weird lube coating that no one seems to be able to recreate well enough for it to cycle well on a ps90
    >barely less expensive than actually just buying the expensive ass ammo
    it's over... 5.7 is just gonna keep going up and up...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Buys a gun chambered in a weird niche high pressure cartridge with industry pressure to keep it mostly factory-only
      >surprised when ammunition and components are hard to find

      Also wut? Are you saying the cases are lubed and you can't clean then for fear that they won't cycle anymore?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Are you saying the cases are lubed and you can't clean then for fear that they won't cycle anymore?
        yes. literally and exactly that. if the casing is not lubed they don't cycle on a P90. people have tried to recreate the factory dry lube to mixed results

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Have you tried leaving a thin layer of sizing lube on there like Hornady one shot or Lee liquid alox? I leave a coating of oneshot on my .303 Brit cases because it helps reduce brass stretching, maybe that'll help with extraction.

          I suppose this is what happens when you design a cartridge around a 50,000 PSI chamber pressure, holy crap. I knew 5.7 was a high pressure cartridge, I never realized it was that bad.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            this is the price you pay for one of the best cartridges tbh. I'm mad because I can't go plinking for less than 100$ for 100 rounds of ammo, but in a self/home defense situation i wouldn't trust any other cartridge to be as effective withough being fired from a 16 inch barrel and making me permanently deaf. you pay for what you get.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              What about .300 BLK from a surpressed rifle?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              High pressure cartridges are exactly what fuck your ears up, anon. Why the hell do you think your PS90 is going to be deafen you less answering a bump in the night than something like a super slow subsonic round?

              I'll stick to my .455 Webley chambered Smith & Wesson 2nd Model Hand Ejector loaded with 260 grain slugs. She was putting down Krauts when my great granddaddy was still shitting his pants, she'll do it again if asked to.

              >Verification not required.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You're worried about german burglars?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                My point was that gun has about thirty years of military use during two of the bloodiest conflicts in human history and almost certainly has bodies on it. It knows what to do.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Based .455 enjoyer. What mold are you using? I need to try a different alloy in my mp molds 265HB

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I don't cast my own (yet), I'm just not in a situation where I can do that anywhere without pissing someone off. For authentic .455 military style loads I use a 260 grain hollow based round nose with the classic super long cone profile. They came in a little zip lock baggie with a bunch of other stuff from a component supplier up here, I can't even remember who cast them originally but I just checked and they aren't in stock right now. I'm in the great white north, though, so .455 components are a little more common up here. For target loads I use the Hornady 255 grain .45 colt LSWC cowboy bullets, they work pretty well.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I’m in Manitoba. Your bullets are probably from Jet bullets who casts that profile. My mold is pretty close to the mkII bullet and I really like that the hollow base is optional depending on your base insert. It’s interesting that .45colt bullets work okay in the S&Ws, the bores are definitely tighter than on a Webley. What’s the cylinder mouth diameter on yours?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I haven't miked the cylinder throats, you need plug gauges for that which I don't have. That specific Hornady bullet is supposed to be around .454" in diameter and they coat them pretty thickly with lube, so they actually work out to around the right diameter on paper. What's actually going on, who knows, all I know is they shoot alright for me.

                The guy that sold it to me actually gave me a really neat contraption to make new cases for it, he had a machinist take an ~2" piece of tool steel round bar and bore out a 0.476" hole in it, then rebate a 0.39" deep shelf on the edge of one end. Starline sells these cases for cowboy action shooting that they call ".45 cowboy special", just a .45 colt case head with a .45 acp case body and capacity. You stick them in this die he made and give them a good squeeze on a leather stamping press, and it squishes the rim down to headspace correctly in a .455 Webley chamber. It ends up being about the same size as a Mk. I .455 case, and you can use some .45 auto rim or .45 acp starting loads to get safe loads for Webley chambered guns.

                I think I can do the same with some .45 Scofield cases if I can get my hands on them, and the loads for those are well within the safe zone for .455 chamber pressures. It might be able to handle standard .45 acp level loads, since it was theoretically made in parallel with the S&W Model 1917's, but I've heard sometimes they skimped on the heat treating on the cylinders for the .455 chambered guns and I don't want to test it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Jet bullets? Long shot and big doubt they're the same "jet" as the old "jet pellets" but where are those made?

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you people concern me.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Normies OUT

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      fuck off queer and suck of ukraine more

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's not a round or caliber that can be reloaded?

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I started reloading in 2017 and have been in the same boat for years. I enjoy reloading as much as shooting. Half my garage is reloading shit.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I still save all my .38 special/.357 brass as and telling myself that I'll get into reloading someday. Are hand presses really that easy?
    is reloading 45-70 worth it? I only recently learned that it was like. 4-ish bucks a round and it killed my interested in grabbing a lever gun.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Weird calibers are better for reloading... I don't really see the point of getting a hand press unless you just can't have something mounted... Even a C press bolted to a board and clamped to a table would be a better solution. you can probably run coated cast lead bullets for the 45-70 and get the cost down some, but components are really expensive right now still. The slope is super slippery though so be warned...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Trail boss
        You notherfucker. There isn't a jar to be had for love or money.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I bought that for subsonic 308 a couple years back, but haven't opened it yet... Same with Longshot and Hispanicy 40S&W...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        But what if I want a new weird hobby? Any suggestions for a good c-press? I'd probably just want to get something for .38/357 and move into .45-70/whatever else at a later time.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Don't get a c-press, they flex when used with larger cartridges like .45-70. Get a lee challenger single stage or a cheap turret press if you really plan on volume, a lee carbide four die set, a cheap powder throw, either a lee safety prime that mounts to your press or a hand priming tool, a powder measure or scale, a set of calipers, and either make or buy a loading block to hold your cases. If you're lazy and don't want to spend any money you can even make do with the trays inside your ammo boxes. That's basically all you need to get started with loading rimmed straight wall cartridges like .38 spl and .45-70 until you get autistic with it. If you sort your brass by length, you'll never need to trim it because these types of cases don't stretch, if you want to mix it up and not bother with that throw it all through one of those hand trimmers and then you'll never need to trim it again. Get your starting loading data from https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/

          That's it. All in you'll need to shell out around $200-$300 to start, if you shoot a fair bit you'll make it back in a year or three and you'll be enjoying hand tailored ammunition all the while.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Holy shit. This is great. Thanks for the help, Anon. I've got no problem getting over that initial cost, too. Will the Lee also do 7.62x51 NATO if it comes down to it?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Yep, I load .308 all the time on mine. The challenger press will load anything from .22 hornet up to .338 lapua, you just need to buy a die set for each caliber (some die sets work for two, such as .38 spl and .357 mag) and it's just slower than some fancier presses because it's a single stage.

              Here's the kit I started out with: https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1013011111?pid=423081

              Add a die set and some form of loading block to that and you're good to start reloading. Get four die carbide sets for pistol cartridges, three die pacesetter sets for bottlenecked rifle cartridges. Beyond that, get a quick trimmer die for any bottlenecked cartridges you plan to shoot a fair number of or any pistol cartridges you'll shoot enough of to care about standardizing case lengths for, getting a nicer powder scale and maybe a powder trickler should be a priority, and a bullet puller is handy to have ready to go. If you shoot a lot of pistol rounds, consider getting a wet tumbler for cleaning your brass. It's not mandatory, but your brass and finished rounds will look nicer, and you won't have to clean out your dies as often.

              Here's a trick to neck sizing with a full length sizer die: Adjust the full length sizer die out so it barely touches the neck, and then slowly screw it down until the sizing mark barely kisses where the case neck meets the shoulders. You can "smoke" the top of the case if you can't see the sizing mark easily, just stick it in the smoke from a candle or lighter 'till it's sooty. Full length size every 3-5 loadings.

              The one thing to look out for in military brass is that the primers are often crimped in. This isn't a big deal getting them out, but getting a new one in is a pain in the ass. The way you fix that is you take a case mouth deburring tool (included in that kit) and ream out the edge of the primer pocket where the crimp is. Boom, you now have a case virtually identical to commercial brass.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw you wanna get into reloading but primers are 150euros for 1000 in your shithole

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What's a good hand press?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Lee hand press w/ quick change, like I posted in the OP

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I have a Lee challenger press and like it. It's supposed to be a cheaper press, and I've never personally loaded on another press, but I like it. YMMV

      https://i.imgur.com/vgR2726.jpg

      Any tips for hand loading revolvers? Specifically on if I need to bother to slug the barrel or not. I tried looking on different forums but it seems like I get different answers.

      If it's a (relatively) modern gun, you shouldn't need to slug the barrel and chamber throats for safety. Take a box of ammo to the range, shoot it, and if you're getting good accuracy don't worry about it and use the standard bullet diameter for your cartridge. If it looks like you pumped a box of buckshot into the target and there's holes everywhere, then you should worry about slugging your diameters and specially sizing your bullets

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      NVM, I keep reading "hand press" and thinking single stage. If you guys want a handheld press you don't need to mount to a bench listen to

      Lee hand press w/ quick change, like I posted in the OP

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Any tips for hand loading revolvers? Specifically on if I need to bother to slug the barrel or not. I tried looking on different forums but it seems like I get different answers.

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How much is it now ? for 1000

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      80-120€ depending on how much a gun store garden gnomes you

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Since I plan on reloading 9mm and also have these acme red lipstick bullets in 147grain. How would I properly seat it into said case with a lee kit?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The same way you would any other bullet. Back out the bullet seater, stick a bullet in a charged case, stick the case in there and close it. Touche the bullet seater to the top of the case. Pull the cartridge out. Screw it in a bit, run the ram, check depth. Repeat until your OAL is where you want it or your case mouths are at the crimp groove, depending on bullet design/cartridge.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There are 3 ways:
      1) use a chamfer tool to chamfer the inside of brass so the bullet starts easier. (Not recommended to permanently modify your brass if you can avoid it)

      2) use a flaring tool like pic related. You hit it with a mallet on the mouth of of the case.

      3) use a powder-through expanding die, which will likely come with your die set.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It'll come in this right?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          IIRC Lee sells it separately.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Now would I be fine with just using everything in the set? Or do I actually need to purchase stuff separately

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              IIRC it's necessary for lead bullets but not jacketed. I'm not sure if you can get by without for the hitek coated lead bullets as those really weren't common yet when I researched Lee Loaders years ago. If you don't use it with lead bullets you'll have trouble with the bullets falling further into the case.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Alright I'll get some normal slugs then. Thanks for the help

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No. That kit will neck size only and that's about it, it's a bare bones kit that's designed to have only what you absolutely need. The other stuff needs to be bought separately or needs a whole reloading press to work, at which point it's cheaper and easier to just buy a normal die set.

          The only bullets that work well in those lee loader kits in my experience are jacketed bullets that don't need to be crimped, and preferably have a beveled or boat tail base. Anything else should be loaded on a press.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Fuck off retard.

          No. That kit will neck size only and that's about it, it's a bare bones kit that's designed to have only what you absolutely need. The other stuff needs to be bought separately or needs a whole reloading press to work, at which point it's cheaper and easier to just buy a normal die set.

          The only bullets that work well in those lee loader kits in my experience are jacketed bullets that don't need to be crimped, and preferably have a beveled or boat tail base. Anything else should be loaded on a press.

          It comes with the flaring tool

          you can see it in the box and on the instruction book in the pic you posted.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I am

            No. That kit will neck size only and that's about it, it's a bare bones kit that's designed to have only what you absolutely need. The other stuff needs to be bought separately or needs a whole reloading press to work, at which point it's cheaper and easier to just buy a normal die set.

            The only bullets that work well in those lee loader kits in my experience are jacketed bullets that don't need to be crimped, and preferably have a beveled or boat tail base. Anything else should be loaded on a press.

            I have the .303 British kit, it definitely doesn't have that tool. I didn't realize there was a significant difference between the pistol and rifle kits.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Ok plan is to get paid, buy kit, buy flaring tool, buy hammer with rubber or whatever on it, get electric scale, bullets and cases.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What caliber was it that you wanted the kit for?

                [...]
                [...]
                It comes with the flaring tool

                you can see it in the box and on the instruction book in the pic you posted.

                just informed us that the pistol kits come with that flaring tool, it's just the rifle kits you'll need to buy it separately for.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                9mm

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Alright. You do not need to buy a separate flaring tool then. You need the kit, a rubber mallet, a powder scale, a powder trickler, your components, and that's about it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Alright sounds great. Thanks.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Also, it's not a hammer with rubber on it, it's a rubber mallet you want. You can get them in basically every hardware store ever for ten bucks or less. Make sure your scale will measure in grains, it's not a food scale you want.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Ok so I get the rubber mallet, THEN I get the rubber coated mallet. All seriousness I'll get an actual rubber mallet. Also, when actually seating a bullet like 9mm do I just base the seating off of another round or just guestimate?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                There's more accurate ways to do it, but you can measure OAL with a cheap caliper. Most reloading data will come with the OAL (Over All Length) they based the data off of and recommend for that specific bullet profile, but there's also standard cartridge dimension diagrams easily available online. To quickly guestimate where your seating depth should be, you can throw a complete factory cartridge into your die and then diel the collar into that depth. My recommendation is that you then raise it up a bit so that if your bullets need to be a little further out than the once used in the factory load, you don't accidentally stick the first one in to deep. From there, screw the collar in slightly further and work your bullet depth in incrementally until it's where you want it.

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I really enjoy making exotic loads. My signature is 185gr .454 Casull at 2200 FPS.

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Any resources on powders? I can figure out presses, casings and primers figured out. But finding the right powder freaks me out for some reason.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Pick a bullet and look at the manufacturer of that bullets reloading manual for best powders.

      Cheat mode: nosler manual tells you most accurate load for their bullets so it's easy to find accuracy nodes. Sierra manual tells you most accurate powder tested for a bullet weight so you can just use that powder with their bullet. Barnes manual tells you most accurate powder for their bullets. Lyman manual will tell you a bullet and accurate powder for that bullet. Any of these can help you find some easy accuracy without trying a bunch of combos.

      Tips: single based stick powders tend to be better, in that they will give you more consistently repeatable burn. This is more important at further distances.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yep, I load .308 all the time on mine. The challenger press will load anything from .22 hornet up to .338 lapua, you just need to buy a die set for each caliber (some die sets work for two, such as .38 spl and .357 mag) and it's just slower than some fancier presses because it's a single stage.

        Here's the kit I started out with: https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1013011111?pid=423081

        Add a die set and some form of loading block to that and you're good to start reloading. Get four die carbide sets for pistol cartridges, three die pacesetter sets for bottlenecked rifle cartridges. Beyond that, get a quick trimmer die for any bottlenecked cartridges you plan to shoot a fair number of or any pistol cartridges you'll shoot enough of to care about standardizing case lengths for, getting a nicer powder scale and maybe a powder trickler should be a priority, and a bullet puller is handy to have ready to go. If you shoot a lot of pistol rounds, consider getting a wet tumbler for cleaning your brass. It's not mandatory, but your brass and finished rounds will look nicer, and you won't have to clean out your dies as often.

        Here's a trick to neck sizing with a full length sizer die: Adjust the full length sizer die out so it barely touches the neck, and then slowly screw it down until the sizing mark barely kisses where the case neck meets the shoulders. You can "smoke" the top of the case if you can't see the sizing mark easily, just stick it in the smoke from a candle or lighter 'till it's sooty. Full length size every 3-5 loadings.

        The one thing to look out for in military brass is that the primers are often crimped in. This isn't a big deal getting them out, but getting a new one in is a pain in the ass. The way you fix that is you take a case mouth deburring tool (included in that kit) and ream out the edge of the primer pocket where the crimp is. Boom, you now have a case virtually identical to commercial brass.

        https://i.imgur.com/YkrBHat.jpg

        Weird calibers are better for reloading... I don't really see the point of getting a hand press unless you just can't have something mounted... Even a C press bolted to a board and clamped to a table would be a better solution. you can probably run coated cast lead bullets for the 45-70 and get the cost down some, but components are really expensive right now still. The slope is super slippery though so be warned...

        Don't get a c-press, they flex when used with larger cartridges like .45-70. Get a lee challenger single stage or a cheap turret press if you really plan on volume, a lee carbide four die set, a cheap powder throw, either a lee safety prime that mounts to your press or a hand priming tool, a powder measure or scale, a set of calipers, and either make or buy a loading block to hold your cases. If you're lazy and don't want to spend any money you can even make do with the trays inside your ammo boxes. That's basically all you need to get started with loading rimmed straight wall cartridges like .38 spl and .45-70 until you get autistic with it. If you sort your brass by length, you'll never need to trim it because these types of cases don't stretch, if you want to mix it up and not bother with that throw it all through one of those hand trimmers and then you'll never need to trim it again. Get your starting loading data from https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/

        That's it. All in you'll need to shell out around $200-$300 to start, if you shoot a fair bit you'll make it back in a year or three and you'll be enjoying hand tailored ammunition all the while.

        Supplies have been ordered. God I can't wait to have something to pour all my autism into.

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This, I love building guns and only like shooting one or two to practice my aim. 80% ban pissed me off because milling lower receivers was a lot of fun.

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pan lube test run of my homebrew BP lube, the bullets are my own cast for the .577 Snider. Fun times with big bores

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Snider
      My absolutely blackest gorilla moron.
      Have you shot it before? My BP lube is pretty much tallow:beeswax:olive oil 5:5:1.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yes I shoot it all the time, it’s a really nice Mk II** converted from an LA Co P53. I’ve tried this lube in my .45-70 Peabody with good success. It’s 45% beeswax, 45% shortening and 10% peanut oil. It actually works well with smokeless too

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Huh, our lubes are practically the same.

          https://i.imgur.com/zHdA1BU.png

          [...]
          Questions to all the hand press bros
          >how many rounds per hour are you able to reload?
          >what else besides the hand press kit would i need to buy? dices, scale, hand primer, powder measure, bullet tray. anything else?
          I live in small apartment and reloading setup that can fit in toolbox would be nice. Other idea would be getting the value turret set and mounting it like pic related.

          I'm out of practice and my .45-70 loading is about 50-70 rounds per hour. Higher if my lady is helping by measuring charges and cleaning cases. If you have room for a mounted press I'd recommend it, unless your round count is really low.

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm in agreement with the joy of reloading, but for me it's more to bring life back to an obscure caliber gun and the challenge of getting the supplies to do them. Nothing feels better than knowing that a gun doesn't have to be a prop or wall hanger anymore. My favorite at the moment is an 1898 S&W hand ejector in .32S&W. It's an absolute joy the ease at which reloading the round is. current challenge is a 7.35 carcano that still has a fantastic bore and a bolt that hasn't even been worn in yet, and will require swaging .308 down to size for a reliable source of bullets.

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Currently doing apartment living.. Any suggestions for a small-ish work bench that lets me store what I need safely so the fucking cat doesn't get to them?

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Realistically can one buy and sell reloaded ammo?
    If that were the care reload old weird milsurp stuff.

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    please someone make the 32 year old relooader meme now thanks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Based and reload-pilled. Keep on reloading, boys.

  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Took a reloading class in college, never done any since. Friend bought me a 50 BMG kit/press to go with my M82 as a gift. How do I reload this? Like, I have some load data sure but the only components I can find are stupid expensive. Also can't find many primers...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >reloading class in college
      where?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        community college in bumfuckistan, really cool professor though, it was a really good class

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well hello fellow techie, tell Jim hi.

      >reloading class in college
      where?

      New Mexico institute of mining and technology
      >NMT to the techies.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *