Why can't I just use a paper "patch" or "wad" to hold the bullet, instead of having to neck size?

Why can't I just use a paper "patch" or "wad" to hold the bullet, instead of having to neck size? That way my brass (theoretically) lasts (virtually) forever as it never gets worked by a die. And I save the most laborious step in the handloading process, which is sizing the neck.

It's for a single shot so recoil bullet setback is a non-issue.

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    shoot some loads, and report back

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do it and report back.

      Now I'm paranoid, what's going to happen? Will it kaboom?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It worked for black powder.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Came here to post this
          OP is halfway to making a Smith carbine (rubber cases and you could seat the bullet by hand)
          As long as the bullet isn't loose and falling out I don't see an issue.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            he'll run into issues if the round he loads is high recoil. the bullets may "jump" forward and cause issues.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              OP said he's using a single shot. he'll be fine.

              OP here, this guy seems to be using undersized bullets with paper patches on sized brass.

              I'm talking about using regular size bullets with paper patches on fire-formed brass

              >regular size bullets
              there won't be enough room for the paper patch, not unless your chamber is way the fuck oversize. which could be the situation i suppose, if it's a vintage rifle.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              It's for a single shot

              if you are only shooting the brass in 1 rifle you dont have to resize.

              You usually have to neck size to hold the bullet... which I'm trying to get around with this

              OP said he's using a single shot. he'll be fine.
              [...]
              >regular size bullets
              there won't be enough room for the paper patch, not unless your chamber is way the fuck oversize. which could be the situation i suppose, if it's a vintage rifle.

              I just put the OP pic in my rifle and it chambers fine. Maybe I'll try more. I just seat it on top of a paper towel and tear off the excess

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >paper towel
                good god.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It holds it pretty damn well. I can't pull it out with my fingers.

                This is already much better than neck sizing

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                not saying you are wrong in theory about lifespan but my experience with neck sizing is the brass lasts for a long time, usually ill lose the case at the range before the neck splits from reloads

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          For very, very low pressure black powder it did

          https://i.imgur.com/NhrPV3V.jpg

          Why can't I just use a paper "patch" or "wad" to hold the bullet, instead of having to neck size? That way my brass (theoretically) lasts (virtually) forever as it never gets worked by a die. And I save the most laborious step in the handloading process, which is sizing the neck.

          It's for a single shot so recoil bullet setback is a non-issue.

          OP do it faget, then report back, if you can

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Quit being a pussy and do it

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It means we don't know either. I can't see any reason why it would explode with a normal powder load, but I can't say if it would chamber properly either.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You're already committed, anon. No backsies now.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The only problem I see is that if you're not annealing, the neck will eventually crack from work hardening.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There's only one way to find out

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          what highspeed low drag mod is this called

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not allowed high capacity cylinders in California m8.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          post fingers

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Post clown car. Gun probably cost more than that toy you're being driven in, didn't it?

            >being retarded enough to automatically assume an anon took the picture they posted

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Post clown car. Gun probably cost more than that toy you're being driven in, didn't it?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous
  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do it and report back.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Here is one man's journey on paper patching. Can it be done? Absolutely, but it's up to you to decide if casting undersized projectiles is less of a hassle than neck sizing.
    https://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?19731-Success-w-30-Cal-paper-patch-bullets&s=8d1265f118f4a9ff4257bc8c41ef3aaa

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP here, this guy seems to be using undersized bullets with paper patches on sized brass.

      I'm talking about using regular size bullets with paper patches on fire-formed brass

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if you can get the bullet into the case with a paper patch around it, then you're gtg. it will shoot, the only question is how accurate it will be. But you may not even need the paper patch, most people shooting the martini cadet (a really lovely single shot rifle) don't bother resizing, they just decap, prime, charge, and seat the new bullet, the die body is screwed all the way up so it doesn't touch the case.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if you are only shooting the brass in 1 rifle you dont have to resize.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        if you're shooting in a repeater then you will usually need to neck size unless you enjoy bullet setback and pressure excursions.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    and allow environment moisture ruin your nitrocellulose?

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably 20% of people here own guns, 10% of those people handload, and there's no way that 2% of people has ever tried stuff like this. Godspeed OP. Tell us what happens.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Make sure you use a lighter to burn off that little bit of excess, otherwise it might jam depending on how tight your chamber is.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So long as it chambers I'd say you're good in a single shot. You might have some inconsistent ignition depending on your primers and powder, the starting pressure is going to be a bit lower.

      Could probably zip around it with a razor for a nice clean finish.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did you flip the round backwards?
    You making German AP?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They're wadcutters

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Godspeed spiderman

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I am here once again to ask you to push these to maximum safe velocity and shoot a quarter inch steel target with them.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Still stuck with necked cartridges instead of having caseless ammo
    Why has ammo innovation practically stalled?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Cases good. Take heat out of system when you eject them. They also sound good when they hit the floor, when you sweep them.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Somehow this was the biggest case innovation in the last 20 years, stalled is an understatement

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        ameritards just can't start making steel cases

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      because the soviet union collapsed too soon

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it’s a shit idea that doesn’t really offer any advantages that matter in almost all cases

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Brass dies from stretching during firing.
    Fucking tard

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      t. retard who thinks springs wear out from being compressed rather than the compression/extension cycle.
      The brass stretches slightly during firing for obturation, and then is supported by the chamber walls. For reloading, you often need to re-form the case so it will hold the bullet. It's this stretching during firing, then re-forming, then stretching again, repeated over and over, that wears out the neck of the brass case and causes splits.
      OP is suggesting using a paper wad when seating the bullet in the brass case, so that it only gets stretched once during initial firing, and then stays in the wider position where it can be supported by the chamber walls, to avoid this.

      https://i.imgur.com/y5yvnSm.jpg

      Cases good. Take heat out of system when you eject them. They also sound good when they hit the floor, when you sweep them.

      >Cases good. Take heat out of system
      This is inarguably true, but I honestly wonder how important it is. I know some people really enjoy rapid-firing through mag after mag and do heat up their guns enough that cookoff could be a concern, but you can't tell me there's no way around that. Hell, even if the solution is fudd-style "one round per 5 seconds" limits, there's still a niche for that. I'd buy a caseless bolt action.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        OP here thanks for clarifying, a lot of people had no idea what I was talking about

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That's yet another step I'd have to do. Why?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Meant for

            just fuckin anneal your brass than you fucking retard

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            so is sizing patches

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Annealing is a short, proven, and relatively simple process that adds life to your cases, while posing less risk to both your gun and your fucking face for a "novel" process that provides the same theoretical material benefit. While also requiring 3-5 extra steps. You also only have to anneal every couple firings rather than obsessively trimming your shitty toilet paper wads and praying your bullets don't fall out of the cases whenever they're dropped or get water infiltrating them during storage.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >a "novel" process
              moron people do this all the time. Shot out and abused .303s are a common candidate.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That's why I was mocking him for doing an old and proven process in an unsafe and incredibly lazy way.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                There's nothing unsafe about it and the lazy version gets rid of your "3-5 extra steps" objection.
                You might say accuracy will suffer, but that's OP's department as to whether it works well enough or not, you have no idea of his requirements there.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just fuckin anneal your brass than you fucking retard

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why can't I just use a paper "patch" or "wad" to hold the bullet, instead of having to neck size? That way my brass (theoretically) lasts (virtually) forever as it never gets worked by a die. And I save the most laborious step in the handloading process, which is sizing the neck.

    20+ years ago Ross Seyfried did a really good article on paper patched bullets. If you can track that article down it would be worth a read. I'm pretty sure he was doing it to shoot modern bullets in some old rifle that had a weird bore size. Not sure it's really applicable to your situation, but it will put you on the right track if you decide to do it.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *