What's the point of "ultralight" camping?

What's the point of "ultralight" camping? Can't you just get a little stronger and a little more endurance from slightly heavier gear?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's the point of this bait posting? Can't you just go out and touch grass?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not bait, I 'm getting into camping and have been doing lots of research, but these people worrying over 50 grams seems so silly

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You're right, and when you're "getting into camping" it's not something to worry about.

        In general though, the more lightweight you can go, the better the experience. Lugging heavy stuff around isn't fun. That's the principle behind ultralight, but I agree that some gearheads really do take it too far. But that applies to all ends of the gimmick camping spectrum (milsurp, ultralight, larp, glamping, so on so forth).

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Some people get lost in the sauce on UL, trying to meet reddit milestones on weight. In reality it's about things like minimalism, comfort on trail mile after mile. Watching the weights is part of that but so is not over packing, looking for multi-use items, and dialing in what you bring.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bait thread but I'm in the mood so I'll bite:

    Ultralight by itself just for the sake of grams autism is mental illness, but for a lot of people it's a mean to an end. And that "end" is usually to clear a room in their pack so their other gears (maybe they're a surveyor/photographer/hunter/etc) can fit in

    >inb4 hurr just strap them outside
    It doesn't work, believe me i tried. They will NEVER be secure enough unless you tie it with like a gorillion bungee cords/webbings which will render your pack (and everything within it) practically inaccessible

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >classic neverPrepHole hypothesis
      You're right, but not for the reasons you think.

      Endlessly strapping shit to your pack really fricks over the way your pack weight sits on your back. Plus it all dangles or moves around all of the damn time, which is a pain in the ass on longer hikes. Some of the things that are branded "ultralight" are just good practices, like only bringing the things you actually use, or having multi-purpose equipment. E.g. if you're using trekking poles anyway, you might as well use them to set up a tarp shelter.

      The main thing about ultralight is just saving on weight to make whatever it is you're doing an easier, more fun experience. Not to be able to bring even more stuff PrepHole.

      That said, ultralight has a whole lot of morons who think you should get by without the most basic comforts because it'll save you five grams. That's completely beyond the point and very autistic. There's a big difference between "I want to pack light because it'll make my experience better" and "I want to pack light because I want to hit some stupid sub-500-grams milestone to brag about".

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ever carried around a heavy bag full of useless stuff for 10 20 or even 100 miles over a week? probably not since out never goes out. i have and carrying heavy stuff sucks. its much more enjoyable to walk around carrying less weight while still having the essentials to be comfortable.

    Even if you're a 6'6 250 lbs of pure muscle chad you can not comfortably carry 100 lbs pack 20 miles a day up a mountain. physics is a real thing. is counting micrograms worth it? probably not, but going from a 50 lb base weight to a 20 lb base weight makes a world of difference in comfort and enjoyment. there's a lot of truth to the more you know the less you carry.

    bait 10. i replied so 4.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Does the weight really add up like that? I'm personally a very big fan of minimalism in general so I like a lot of the ideas, but I feel like a coulple pounds won't make a huge difference. But I'm sure it matters more to multi-day hikers compared to someone like me who just wants a somewhat minimalist weekend solo camp experience

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yes. one or two pounds is a huge addition to your pack. it depends on how far out you're hiking to your campsite though. if it's under ten miles you should be fine with 30, maybe 40lbs on you but over that the average weekend warrior will likely have trouble getting home the next day

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No matter how strong you are, you can go farther and faster with lighter gear. But a lot of UL gear is fragile. I wouldn't depend on it in the backcountry.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You could have most things you typically bring provided with a bit of bushcraft, but it is time consuming.
    Bringing gear is really just a matter of comfort and efficiency vs weight and bulk.
    I could not fault a person for that, but I believe comfort and efficiency has an upper limit when you are required to carry it all together. That limit varies with each individual.
    I like tarps but a thick sleeping bag, but someone else might prefer a wool blanket and a 3 man tent. It's totally incomparable and weight can't fully measure the value of something alone.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A select few UL campers do it for practical reasons such as reducing weight to increase comfort, but the majority are just minmaxing turbo homosexuals who think PrepHole needs to be a competition to see who can carry their toothpaste dots the fastest

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    im not fully ultralight but i love ultralight gear because they take up so little space, i can deal with a heavy pack but frick big packs. quilts are also much more comfortable for me than sleeping bags

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Me too! I love compact and low maintainence stuff

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A few pounds makes a huge difference. I started out with a 25-30 pound bag for single overnighters. Im down to about 20 pounds now and my last three day trip was comfortably done with a 40 liter pack vs my old 65. The difference between 30 and 20 lbs is huge if youre walking for more than half an hour. After buying a new tent and sleeping bag I should be down a couple more pounds and might be able to fit everything in my super comfortable 30 liter running vest-style backpack, which means I can enjoy being out more and hike longer distances.

    But hey, do you OP

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's more of a challenge and a way to flex that you're less about absurd levels of comfort. Of course, no judgement if you wanna carry all that stuff. There's a problem in camping where people get an ludicrous amount of shit that you don't really need to make your experience as comfortable as possible. Even if it means you get raped financially. Looking at Canadian Prepper with that fricking house on his God damn back on his doomsday electric bicycle.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ultralight is for people who want to trade comfort while hiking with comfort while camping. Sure your pack is 10 lbs lighter, but your sleeping system sucks balls and you can't cook a proper meal. Some people are okay with that. Personally, I'm out there to enjoy myself, and not being able to get a good night's rest and eating nothing but dehydrated crap ruins the entire trip.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      is for people who want to trade comfort while hiking with comfort while camping.

      Cowflop. I'm in my fifties and I both hike and sleep comfortably. There is only a dichotomy if you are inexperienced, stupid and/or poor.

      My baseweight for three seasons is under 17 lbs and much lighter in the heat of the summer. My quilts weigh practically nothing and compress small. They are true to temperature, 10F and 50F. The tradeoff was money to buy 950 and 1000 fill goose down.

      I make, dehydrate and vac bag my own gourmet meals that I just add hot water to, wait and consooom. They're danged good and a days meals weigh a pound or less. Again the downside is forward thinking, money and time.

      But you are wrong you can't have a great PrepHole unless you choose between the hike and your camp. See you in AK.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fellow AK folk? Tell me about your bedding :V

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The best heavy gear is more comfortable than the best light gear when it comes to sleep systems. And having real camp fires is always more cozy than cooking on a tiny gas stove. Real fresh food is always better tasting dehydrated food. You might think all the light gear alternatives are great, and maybe they are, but it's still a compromise. You don't eat dehydrated meals at home for dinner every day for a reason.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Can't you just get a little stronger and a little more endurance from slightly heavier gear?
    If you get stronger and get more endurance you can go farther with same gear OR go the same distance with less effort OR pack more food/luxury stuff and go the same distance... or you can bring heavy shit to own people online. You pick.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They want to carry more less, and they cant carry more less if their more isnt as less as it can be, otherwise they cant carry even more less. Its not about strength or endurance, its about more less.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

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