What's the deal with biogas digesters? Why aren't they more common of a thing?

What's the deal with biogas digesters?
Why aren't they more common of a thing? They seem like they'd be pretty great for homesteading and off-grid life but I can barely even find any resources about them compared to other alternative energy generation methods.

What's the catch?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Bepis

    How much energy can you possibly get from a partially inflated beach bicycle innertube? That probably produces about as much heat/flame as 3 toothpicks burning.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, i have never seen something like in the OP pic but the very big fermenters are quite common here in germany. The gas is somewhat 'dirty' though and in order to be used in heating your home or powering your tractor or car it need to be filtrated again. Funnily enough many did it because the state gave them a large tax break for doing it and they grew corn and all sorts of exotic fast growing plants wirh high energy yields like 'elephant grass' just to throw it in there. Sellkng the gas was not as profitable so many did not pay for the expensive attachment to the public grid. And then putin stopped selling us cheap russian gas hahahah

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      apparently using a tractor tire innertube along with the waste from a few humans and maybe a farm animal can give you several cubic feet of gas a day-- enough to cook a couple meals a day.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn't these digestors stink very bad

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >What's the catch?
      uh oh stinky

      Shouldn't it only stink if it has a leak in the system?

      apparently using a tractor tire innertube along with the waste from a few humans and maybe a farm animal can give you several cubic feet of gas a day-- enough to cook a couple meals a day.

      See, that sounds like it's a good deal for self sufficiency, right?
      There's gotta be something actually wrong with them that people aren't telling anyone otherwise they'd have to absolutely be more widespread.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >There's gotta be something actually wrong with them that people aren't telling anyone otherwise they'd have to absolutely be more widespread.
        It takes work every single day to keep them running, plus whitoids are afraid of flammable gas. If you already have gas service to your house, then saving 1$ a month isn't really desirable for most westerners.
        Brownoids who would most benefit from it usually just cook on wood or coal like they're used to. Also, adding more complexity as a "solution" to simple poor peoples' problems isn't really viable or helpful for the most part...

        It's not that there's anything especially wrong with the idea; it's just that it's a poor fit for the exact people that it's most suited to benefit.

        It's kind of the same thing with DIYing a flushable toilet and simple septic system for people who shit in an outhouse. The reason that they live the way that they do is because they're poor and technically unsophisticated people who won't/can't build or maintain more complicated techniques for themselves.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >It takes work every single day to keep them running
          People in off-grid or homestead situations are gonna have daily chores to do anyway, mixing up a bucket of organic slurry and dumping it into a reactor isn't really that much work to add to the list is it?

          >If you already have gas service to your house, then saving 1$ a month isn't really desirable for most westerners.
          I still would prefer to produce my own gas on site and not have to rely on all the extra processing that goes into capturing, compressing, storing and delivering it to my property.
          It's like how rainwater isn't cheaper than using city water but it's still a better idea from a purely self-sufficiency focused mindset.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >There's gotta be something actually wrong with them that people aren't telling anyone otherwise they'd have to absolutely be more widespread.
          This is because you usually need a warm or hot climate to activate one. About 35 C, give or take, is where it needs to stay. Otherwise, you need to heat it to that temperature somehow until it begins to work. From then onward, you could use a device to help it heat itself, but this takes extensive time, trial, and error.

          >Brownoids who would most benefit from it usually just cook on wood or coal like they're used to
          There are plenty of people running them for lightweight electricity in third-world or impoverished conditions.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >This is because you usually need a warm or hot climate to activate one. About 35 C, give or take, is where it needs to stay
            Well there we go.
            The reason it doesn't work in the civilized world.
            Tropic climate exclusive tech tree option.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >The reason it doesn't work in the civilized world.
              >U.S. farmers use them

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                DO US farmers actually use them?
                I didn't see anything about that, it's like all Kenyan and Nigerian companies that make the large kits and stuff.
                35 C is pretty hot to expect it to work regularly in most of the US isn't it?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yes, I spent a few years working on farm digester design. They're usually reserved to large operations with enough cows or pigs to produce enough to shit to make the lifecycle costs of the digester equipment to come out lower than the net electricity produced. I left that line of work when upgrading gas to tie back into NG pipelines was in its infancy, but I was at a seminar last year that showed a few examples of dairy farms doing just that.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >There's gotta be something actually wrong with them that people aren't telling anyone otherwise they'd have to absolutely be more widespread.
          This is because you usually need a warm or hot climate to activate one. About 35 C, give or take, is where it needs to stay. Otherwise, you need to heat it to that temperature somehow until it begins to work. From then onward, you could use a device to help it heat itself, but this takes extensive time, trial, and error.

          >Brownoids who would most benefit from it usually just cook on wood or coal like they're used to
          There are plenty of people running them for lightweight electricity in third-world or impoverished conditions.

          >you could use a device to help it heat itself
          I should clarify that it's possible, but I don't know how feasible it would be depending on how cold the weather gets. There's also the hydrogen sulfide that gets produced with the gas, which is highly corrosive and smells horrible. You'd need a filtration system to clean it from the gas.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What's the catch?
    uh oh stinky

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Or natural gas. I mean it's the same type of gas. I filter it with a spin-on filter after the regulator. The pipe is old and has little bits of dirt and rust occasionally.

    The trick is getting it into a vehicle. Otherwise it's only good for stationary stuff. We had a good DIY rundown from a member on how to compress it w a hydraulic cylinder.

    I see a bridge, with NG generator-solar-battery, where you dump load your excess energy, into an e-truck hybrid of some sort (idk about the modern stainless tesla thing, an Edison instead), then drive your ~50 miles into town and back for free, and run off diesel if you have to go further. That Edison hybrid truck design for regular trucks (not semi's) is heating up. Will blow past weirdo elon's stainless contraption, from popularity alone. And the fact is, that The Elephant (Topsy, the pre-production road approved semi hybrid diesel) is head and shoulders above the tesla semi in practicality. It is better at everything, even though it wasn't designed for long-haul common carrier trucking; the only thing the Tesla Semi is targeted at, and the Edison does it better.

    > t. has gas on the property (a gas well). I think I'm the only poster on DIY presently that has one, and I've posted about it before.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How do you actually make use of the gas though?
    If it's not under pressure how do you get it out of the tube with any usable consistency?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it's a sealed system that is very much pressurized. the bacteria don't stop being bacteria over 1 atmosphere, they go until the heat kills them (compost fires anyone?) or the pressure does, and that barrel is giving way long before the bacteria.

      ever wonder why cans have that pop top to them? it sucks in during cooldown after canning, and if it comes up, it means the product inside is spoiled. the bacteria create pressure with gas byproducts.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >and if it comes up, it means the product inside is spoiled. the bacteria create pressure with gas byproducts
        Whoa, I just thought it meant someone else opened the can before if it was popped up and the vacuum seal being broken and no longer shelf-stable was what the pop-top warned you of.
        Learn something new every day.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what the frick is a bioga

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What the hell

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Common in Africa

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My local grocery store chain uses one for all of the food waste they produce. It powers 40% of their distribution warehouse. After each delivery (18 wheelers) they put the waste on pallets and receive it upon the next pickup. The process facility smells god awful and almost made me gag walking through it. I think they’re good at the commercial level but at the residential level it’s not worth the trouble. A 20 Gal propane cylinder is like $18 right now to fill and can last you months (cooking only). MM02

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you have a well insulated shed to.put it.in, would i produce enough gas to keep the room warm enough for it to continue producing gas over winter?

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What happens if you try to compress the gas generated by this system?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It becomes compressed?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Think it has to be purified first?

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